Overview

Distribution

W Guangxi, Xizang, Yunnan [Bhutan, NE India, N Myanmar, Nepal, Sikkim, N Thailand]
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Himalaya (Nepal to Assam), N. Burma, Tibet, S.W. China (Yunnan).
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Physical Description

Morphology

Elevation Range

1600-2800 m
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Description

Trees to 40 m tall. Branchlets tawny tomentose, glabrescent. Petiole 2-4 cm; leaf blade ovate-elliptic, 16-30(-39) × 6-8(-10) cm, leathery, abaxially pruinose or with pale brown, shortly stellate hairs and sometimes glabrescent, adaxially green and glabrous, base cuneate to subrounded, margin serrate or entire on basal 1/3, apex acuminate to caudate; midvein and secondary veins abaxially prominent but adaxially impressed; secondary veins 18-25(-33) on each side of midvein; tertiary veins abaxially conspicuous. Infructescences usually with 1-3 fruit. Cupule oblate to semiglobose, 2-3 × 3-5 cm, enclosing 2/3-4/5 or sometimes all nut, outside and inside orangish tomentose, wall 2-5 mm on sides and 3-8 mm at base; bracts in 7-10 rings, thinly lamellate, margin subentire but denticulate when ripe. Nut oblate, 2-3 × 3-4 cm, tomentose, glabrescent, apex flat, rounded, or umbonate; scar 2-3 cm in diam., flat to slightly convex; stylopodium persistent, ca. 5 mm in diam. Fl. Apr-May, fr. Nov-Dec.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Quercus lamellosa Smith in Rees, Cycl. 29: Quercus no. 23. 1814; Cyclobalanopsis fengii Hu & W. C. Cheng; C. lamelloides (C. C. Huang) Y. T. Chang; C. nigrinervis Hu; Q. lamelloides C. C. Huang.
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Ecology

Habitat

Mixed mesophytic forests in mountains; 1300-2500 m.
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Wikipedia

Quercus lamellosa

Quercus lamellosa in the jungle of Panchkhal VDC, Nepal

Quercus lamellosa(Nepali:फलाँट, Falant) (syn. Cyclobalanopsis lamellosa) is a species of Quercus native to the Himalaya and adjoining mountains from Nepal east to southwest China and northern Thailand, growing at altitudes of 1300-2500 m.

It is a medium-sized to large evergreen tree growing to 40 m tall with a trunk up to 1.5 m diameter. The leaves are spirally arranged, ovate-elliptic, 16-45 cm long and 6-15 cm broad, with a sharply serrated margin. The flowers are catkins, the female flowers maturing into broad acorns 2-3 cm long and 3-4 cm broad, set in a deep cupule with concentric rings of woody scales.

Joseph Dalton Hooker commented,

"The present is one of the commonest trees about Dorjiling, and is certainly by far the noblest species of Oak known, whether from the size of the foliage or acorns, the texture and colour, or the imposing appearance of the tree." [1].

It is occasionally cultivated as an ornamental tree in warm-temperate climates; in the British Isles, cultivation is only successful in the milder parts of Ireland and Cornwall.

References

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