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Overview

Brief Summary

Fagaceae -- Beech family

    Paul S. Johnson

    Bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa), also known as blue oak,  mossy-overcup oak, mossy-overcup oak, and scrub oak, has the  largest acorns of all native oaks and is very drought resistant.  It grows slowly on dry uplands and sandy plains but is also found  on fertile limestone soils and moist bottomlands in mixture with  other hardwoods. In the west, it is a pioneer tree invading  prairie grasslands, and it is planted frequently in shelterbelts.  The acorns become an important source of food to wildlife. The  wood is commercially valuable and marketed as white oak. The  comparative ease with which bur oak can be grown makes it a fine  tree for streets or lawns.

  • Burns, Russell M., and Barbara H. Honkala, technical coordinators. 1990. Silvics of North America: 1. Conifers; 2. Hardwoods.   Agriculture Handbook 654 (Supersedes Agriculture Handbook 271,Silvics of Forest Trees of the United States, 1965).   U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Washington, DC. vol.2, 877 pp.   http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/silvics_manual/table_of_contents.htm External link.
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Paul S. Johnson

Source: Silvics of North America

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Comprehensive Description

Comments

This tree has the largest acorns of any oak. Not only are the acorns large, but they have a distinctive appearance because of the conspicuous fringe along the rim of their cups. Bur Oak is a member of the White Oak group, which means that its acorns mature in a single year, its leaves lack bristles at the tips of their lobes, and it can hybridize with many other oaks within this group. In addition to its distinctive acorns, Bur Oak can be distinguished from other oaks by the corky ridges of its branches and the shape of its leaves. Generally, the leaves of Bur Oak have deeper lobes than those of many other oaks, and the deepest lobes usually occur along the lower half of the length of each leaf. Bur Oak can be distinguished from the similar White Oak (Quercus alba) by the tomentose hairs on the lower sides of its leaves; the leaves of the latter oak are hairless on their undersides.
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© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

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Description

This native tree is 80-120' tall at maturity, forming an ovoid to globoid crown with a tall stout trunk (up to 5' across). The branches of the crown are ascending to widely spreading and somewhat crooked. The thick trunk bark is gray to gray-brown with flat corky ridges and deep irregular furrows. The bark of branches and twigs is gray-brown to brown and often rather corky with flat elevated ridges. Alternate leaves about 4-10" long and 2½–5" across develop from the twigs. These leaves are obovate or broadly elliptic in outline and pinnatifid with rounded lobes. Most lobes extend moderately to deeply into the leaf blade. The deepest lobes usually occur along the lower one-half of the blade. Leaf margins are undulate and irregular, lacking any bristles or true teeth. Upper leaf surfaces are dark green and glabrous, while lower surfaces are pale gray-green and densely tomentose with short fine hairs. These hairs are often stellate or clustered together (visible with a 10x hand lens). The petioles are ½–1" long, light green, and either glabrous or tomentose. Bur Oak is monoecious, producing both male (staminate) and female (pistillate) flowers on the same tree. The male flowers are produced in drooping yellowish catkins about 2-5" long; individual male flowers consist of a lobed calyx with 5-20 stamens. Female flowers are either solitary or clustered together in groups of 2-3. Individual female flowers (about 1/8" in length) consist of a pistil that is covered with appressed scales (involucral bracts) with red styles at its tip. Overall, a female flower has the appearance of a tiny narrow cone. Both male and female flowers bloom as the leaves begin to develop during the spring. Cross-pollination is by wind. During the summer, fertile female flowers develop into nuts that are either solitary or occur in pairs. The nuts occur on short stalks up to 1" long (shorter than the petioles of the leaves); they are often nearly sessile. Nuts mature in a single year and usually germinate during the fall of the same year. Individual nuts (including their cups) are 1½–2½" long and similarly across; they are initially green, but become brown to grayish brown at maturity. The distinctive cups extend at least one-half the length of the nuts, sometimes nearly enclosing them. The coarse scales of the cups are keeled and rather knobby in appearance; the outer scales along the rim each cup have soft awns up to 1/3" (10 mm.) in length, forming a conspicuous fringe around the nut. The starchy meat of the nuts is low in tannins and potentially edible. The root system produces a deep taproot and widely spreading lateral roots. At favorable sites, this tree sometimes forms colonies. Cultivation
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© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

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Description

General: Beech Family (Fagaceae). Native trees growning to 25 m tall, with a broad, rounded crown, sometimes shrubby; branches and branchlets with corky-winged projections; bark light gray, thick, rough, furrowed into scaly plates and vertical flattened ridges. Leaves deciduous, alternate, obovate, shaped like a fiddle, tapering to a wedge-shaped base, 10–25 cm long and 6–12 cm wide, widest above the middle, with 2–3 rounded lobes on upper half of leaf and 5–7 deeper lobes on lower half of leaf, dark green above, gray-green below, turning yellow or brown in fall. Male and female flowers are borne in separate catkins on the same tree (the species monoecious) on the current year's branchlets. Acorns maturing in the first year, 2.5–5 cm long and wide, with a deep, thick, fringed cup covering 1/2 to 3/4 of the acorn, the scales knobby, long-pointed with narrow free tips. The common name (bur) is in reference to the cap-covered acorn.

Variation within the species: Three varieties are commonly recognized within the species.

Var. depressa (Nutt.) Engelm. (Q. mandanensis Rydb.) – mostly along the western margin of the Great Plains; small trees or shrubs with smaller and less fringed cups and corky twigs.

Var. macrocarpa – over most of the species range; trees with large thick cups.

Var. oliviformis (Michx. f.) A. Gray) – Iowa, Minnesota, South Dakota, and North Dakota; trees with thinner and smaller cups. This is sometimes considered within the typical variety.

Bur oak is a member of the white oak subgroup (subgenus Lepidobalanus) and hybridizes with various related species, including northern pin oak (Q. ellipsoidalis), white oak (Q. alba), swamp white oak (Q. bicolor), overcup oak (Q. lyrata), swamp chestnut oak (Q. michauxii), chinkapin oak (Q. muehlenbergii), post oak (Q. stellata), live oak (Q. virginiana), and Gambel’s oak (Q. gambelii).

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USDA NRCS National Plant Data Center & the Biota of North America Program

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

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Alternative names

Blue oak, mossycup oak, mossy-overcup oak

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Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

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Distribution

Range and Habitat in Illinois

Bur Oak is a common tree that is found in every county of Illinois. Habitats include moist bottomland woodlands, upland woodlands, and savannas where deciduous trees are dominant. This tree is most commonly found in bottomland woodlands a little outside of the flood zone. It also occurs in savannas and can be an invader of prairies because of its resistance to fire. Occasionally, Bur Oak is cultivated as a landscape tree, where it can become quite large.
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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: E. temperate N. Am., from New Brun. to Sask., and south from MD and AR to TX. Peripheral.

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More info for the terms: fire exclusion, fuel, hardwood, restoration, succession

© Elbert Little, United States Forest Service

The map above illustrates bur oak's distribution in North America as of 1971. Of the North American oaks, bur oak is the most widely distributed [118] and ranges farthest north [168]. General information about the potential distribution of bur oak hybrids is presented in the Introductory section.

Local distribution changes: In many parts of its North American range, the abundance of and area occupied by bur oak has decreased dramatically since European settlement. Conservation and restoration of bur oak has become a management priority for disjunct populations as well as populations within the continuous bur oak range. Agency experts in Canada consider bur oak a conservation priority because it has decreased in abundance, and its habitats are in high demand for development [20]. In New Brunswick, bur oak populations occur about 470 miles (750 km) beyond the continuous North American distribution of the species and about 150 miles (250 km) from the nearest conspecific population in Maine. As of 2009 populations and scattered individuals occupied a combined area of less than 1.9 mi² (5 km²) in this province. All bur oak populations in New Brunswick occurred in narrow areas along floodplains and riverbanks, and many occurred on privately owned lands threatened by waterfront developments [167].

Bur oak savannas in the Midwest and Great Plains were ideal sites for European settlers because they provided wood for homes and fuel, and forage for livestock. Agricultural and urban development together with fire exclusion led to widespread loss of the bur oak savanna ecosystem [34,183,236]. In the early 1900s, oak savannas occupied up to 32 million acres (13 million ha) in the Midwest, and in 1985, only about 6,400 acres (2,600 ha) of "high-quality" oak savanna remained [183]. In Wisconsin, researchers estimated that 5.5 million acres (2.2 million ha) of oak savanna existed before European settlement, but as of the late 1990s, just 500 acres (200 ha) existed (review by [267]). When describing the historical extent of bur oak savannas and a single remaining remnant savanna in southern Wisconsin, Stout [236] called his report "an obituary" for bur oak. In Texas, bur oak occurs on the drier sites within bottomland hardwood forests. Prior to European settlement, these forests likely occurred over 16 million acres (6.5 million ha), but as of early 2000, less than 40% of the forests remain [18]. For more about how fire exclusion and woodland succession contribute to the loss of bur oak trees and savanna ecosystems, see Succession in the absence of fire.

  • 18. Barry, Dwight; Kroll, Andrew J. 2003. A phytosociological description of a remnant bottomland hardwood forest in Denton, Texas. LLELA Research Note 5. Lewisville, TX: Lewisville Lake Environmental Learning Area. 9 p. Available online: http://www.ias.unt.edu/llela/main.htm. [49461]
  • 20. Beardmore, Tannis; Loo, Judy; McAfee, Brenda; Malouin, Christian; Simpson, Dale. 2006. A survey of tree species of concern in Canada: the role for genetic conservation. The Forestry Chronicle. 82(3): 351-363. [63693]
  • 34. Breining, Greg. 1993. The case of the missing ecosystem. Nature Conservancy. 43(6): 11-15. [22100]
  • 118. Hosie, R. C. 1969. Native trees of Canada. 7th ed. Ottawa, ON: Canadian Forestry Service, Department of Fisheries and Forestry. 380 p. [3375]
  • 167. McPhee, Donnie A.; Loo, Jude A. 2009. Past and present distribution of New Brunswick bur oak populations: a case for conservation. Northeastern Naturalist. 16(1): 85-100. [82165]
  • 168. McWilliams, William H.; O'Brien, Renee A.; Reese, Gordon C.; Waddell, Karen L. 2002. Distribution and abundance of oaks in North America. In: McShea, William J.; Healy, William M., eds. Oak forest ecosystems: Ecology and management for wildlife. Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press: 13-33. [43465]
  • 183. Nuzzo, Victoria A. 1986. Extent and status of Midwest oak savanna: presettlement and 1985. Natural Areas Journal. 6(2): 6-36. [50415]
  • 236. Stout, A. B. 1944. The bur oak openings in southern Wisconsin. Transactions of the Wisconsin Academy of Science. 36: 141-161. [264]
  • 267. Willert, Jolene M. 2000. Oak savanna restoration: management techniques to inhibit exotic shrub reinvasion. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin-Madison. 142 p. Thesis. [80742]

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Bur oak is widely distributed throughout the Eastern United States  and the Great Plains. It ranges from southern New Brunswick,  central Maine, Vermont, and southern Quebec, west through Ontario  to southern Manitoba, and extreme southeastern Saskatchewan,  south to North Dakota, extreme southeastern Montana, northeastern  Wyoming, South Dakota, central Nebraska, western Oklahoma, and  southeastern Texas, then northeast to Arkansas, central  Tennessee, West Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, and  Connecticut. It also grows in Louisiana and Alabama.

   
  -The native range of bur oak.


  • Burns, Russell M., and Barbara H. Honkala, technical coordinators. 1990. Silvics of North America: 1. Conifers; 2. Hardwoods.   Agriculture Handbook 654 (Supersedes Agriculture Handbook 271,Silvics of Forest Trees of the United States, 1965).   U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Washington, DC. vol.2, 877 pp.   http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/silvics_manual/table_of_contents.htm External link.
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Paul S. Johnson

Source: Silvics of North America

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Man., N.B., Sask., Ont., Que.; Ala., Ark., Conn., Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kans., Ky., La., Maine, Md., Mass., Mich., Minn., Mo., Mont., Nebr., N.J., N.Y., N.Dak., Ohio, Okla., Pa., S.Dak., Tenn., Tex., Vt., Va., W.Va., Wis., Wyo.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Adaptation

Bur oak grows in a range of habitats and moisture regimes – from prairies to valley floors and upland woods. It is a pioneer or early seral species at prairie margins, but bur oak savannas have declined due to grazing and fire suppression. It grows quickly on moist, rich bottomlands but is relatively intolerant of flooding during the growing season. At the north and west ends of its range, where bur oak occurs on rocky bluffs with thin soil and where repeated fire also may be common, it commonly grows as small trees or thickets of low shrubs. Young plants grow well in full sun to partial sun.

Flowering occurs from April through June, just after leaves develop, while fruiting occurs from August to November.

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USDA NRCS National Plant Data Center & the Biota of North America Program

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

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Bur oak is grows natively throughout much of the north-central United States and the eastern Great Plains. It occurs from southern New Brunswick and New England westward to the Dakotas and southeastern Montana, and south to Tennessee, Arkansas, and the central prairies of Texas – with rare outliers in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama. For current distribution, please consult the Plant Profile page for this species on the PLANTS Web site.

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USDA NRCS National Plant Data Center & the Biota of North America Program

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Trees , deciduous, to 30(-50) m. Bark dark gray, scaly or flat-ridged. Twigs grayish or reddish, 2-4 mm diam., often forming extensive flat, radiating, corky wings, finely pubescent. Buds 2-5(-6) mm, glabrous. Leaves: petiole (6-)15-25(-30) mm. Leaf blade obovate to narrowly elliptic or narrowly obovate, often fiddle-shaped, (50-)70-150(-310) × (40-)50-130(-160) mm, base rounded to cuneate, margins moderately to deeply lobed, toothed, deepest sinuses near midleaf (at least in proximal 2/3), sinuses reaching nearly to midrib, longer lobes grading into shallow lobes or merely simple teeth distally, shallower, compound lobes proximally, secondary veins arched, divergent, 4-5(-10) on each side, apex broadly rounded or ovate; surfaces abaxially light green or whitish, with minute appressed-stellate hairs forming dense, rarely sparse, tomentum, erect felty hairs absent, adaxially dark green or dull gray, sparsely puberulent to glabrate. Acorns 1-3 on stout peduncle (0-)6-20(-25) mm; cup hemispheric or turbinate, (8-)15-50 mm deep × (10-)20-60 mm wide, enclosing 1/2-7/8 nut or more, scales closely appressed, laterally connate, broadly triangular, keeled, tuberculate, finely grayish tomentose, those near margins often with soft awns to 5-10 mm or more, forming fringe around nut; nut light brown or grayish, ovoid-ellipsoid or oblong, (15-)25-50 × (10-)20-40 mm, finely puberulent or floccose. Cotyledons distinct. 2 n = 24.
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Description

More info for the terms: cover, shrub, tree

Botanical description: This description covers characteristics that may be relevant to fire ecology and is not meant for identification. Keys for identification are available (e.g., [29,87,90,237]).

Aboveground description: Bur oak typically grows as a large, spreading tree up to 130 feet (40 m) tall; however, growth form and size can vary by site. Branches in the upper portion of the crown are ascending; in the lower crown, branches are larger and horizontal [68,234,237]. The trunks of mature trees have thick, deeply grooved bark [121] and may measure 8.5 feet (2.6 m) in diameter [63]. In the western part of its range on exposed, harsh sites, bur oak grows as a small tree or shrub [72,90,118] and may produce crooked, gnarled branches [68]. Bur oak growth forms may relate to moisture availability. In the Niobrara Valley Preserve, bur oak may only reach 15 feet (4.6 m) tall on moisture-limited sites but may reach 50 feet (15 m) tall on floodplains [99]. Growth may also be affected by browsing pressure. Bur oak was dwarfed in heavily browsed areas of Manitoba and Saskatchewan [23].

Bur oak is a long-lived tree. It is common to find remnant trees that are 300 to 400 years old [55,93], and in a savanna in Kentucky, a bur oak tree was an estimated 440 years old [38].

The sizes and shapes of bur oak leaves are variable, but generally leaves are deeply lobed and large, up to 12 inches (30 cm) long and about half as wide [90,121,211]. Shallowly lobed leaves may occur on bur oak sprouts or deeply shaded branches [90], and small leaves are common in the Northern Great Plains [234]. Leaves are deep green shiny above and coated with white hairs below [118]. Bur oak produces male flowers in 3- to 4-inch (7-10 cm) long catkins, and female flowers are solitary or in clusters of up to 4 [90,234].

Bur oak acorns are generally 1-seeded with a cup that covers at least 33% of the nut and may, though rarely, cover the entire nut [63,87,90,211,237]. Acorn size and cup coverage can vary by site. In the Northern Great Plains, bur oak produces small fruits and cups with low coverage, which may be the result of past hybridization with Gambel oak [234]. In general, acorn size decreases with increasing latitude [72]; bur oak acorns from a site in Texas averaged 7.5 g, while in Minnesota they averaged 0.9 g [140]. Diameter of acorns in Texas can be 2 inches (5 cm) [60,222]. Bur oak acorn size differences can even occur over small changes in latitude. Acorns produced in Wisconsin were much smaller than those produced in southern Illinois and Missouri [55]. Acorn size can also vary with shadiness of habitat. In east-central Nebraska, bur oak acorns from shady habitats weighed more than those from open habitats. Acorns collected from a closed-canopy floodplain forest weighed 1.3 to 6 g and those from open savannas weighed 0.5 to 2.5 g [144].

Belowground description: Typically bur oak produces extensive root systems with wide-spreading laterals and a deep taproot [8,68,118]. Several studies describe the root system of bur oak from seedling stage to maturity, although mature trees in these studies were not very old (43-80 years old).

Seedlings and saplings: Bur oak rapidly develops deep and wide-spreading roots. At the end of the 1st growing season, bur oak roots may reach 4.6 feet (1.4 m) deep and spread 2.54 feet (0.76 m) (review by [125]). Root systems of bur oak saplings are described in the table below.

Characteristics of root systems of bur oak saplings at different ages and locations
Tree age (yrs) Tree height Taproots Lateral roots Site
3 3.5 ft 5 ft deep 2.5-ft spread silt loam soil in Lancaster County, Nebraska [225]
8 ----* 14.6 ft deep;
1.3-in. diameter at 4 ft deep
11-ft spread;
18-24 laterals from top 14 in. of taproot
upland clay soil near Fayette, Missouri [24]
12 14 ft 13 ft deep 11.5-ft spread silt loam soil in Richardson County, Nebraska [225]
*No information.

Mature trees: In the few excavation studies involving mature bur oak trees, root spread and penetration increased with tree age in clay, loam, and loess soils. A 43-year-old, 20-foot (6 m) tall bur oak tree growing in clay soil in North Dakota produced a taproot that was a little over 8 feet (2.4 m) long. The longest lateral root was 41 feet (12.5 m) [274]. A review reports that a 43-year-old bur oak growing in a prairie had nearly equal weights of above- and belowground biomass [125]. In eastern Nebraska, researchers excavated and described the entire root system of a 65-year-old bur oak tree growing in a deep, fertile, fine-textured loam with a high water-holding capacity. The tree was 37.5 feet (11.4 m) tall with a basal diameter of 14 inches (36 cm). There were 64 main roots with diameters greater than 2 inches (5 cm) that were 3.5 to 15 feet (1.1-4.6 m) long. The taproot was 14 feet (4.3 m) deep. Within a 12-foot (3.6 m) radius of the tree trunk, there were 64 main taproot branches, 82 secondary roots, and an abundance of rootlets. Bur oak aboveground biomass was 1,285 lbs, and the root system weight was nearly the same [262]. In Nance County, Nebraska, an 80-year-old, 20-foot (6.1 m) tall bur oak growing in loess soil produced a root system that reached 16 feet (4.9 m) deep and 72 feet (22 m) wide [225].

  • 87. Gleason, Henry A.; Cronquist, Arthur. 1991. Manual of vascular plants of northeastern United States and adjacent Canada. 2nd ed. New York: New York Botanical Garden. 910 p. [20329]
  • 8. Aikman, John M. 1926. Distribution and structure of the forests of eastern Nebraska. Nebraska University Studies. 26(1-2): 1-75. [6575]
  • 23. Bird, Ralph D. 1961. Ecology of the aspen parkland of western Canada in relation to land use. Contribution No. 27. Ottawa: Canada Department of Agriculture, Research Branch. 153 p. [15620]
  • 24. Biswell, Harold H. 1935. Effects of environment upon the root habits of certain deciduous forest trees. Botanical Gazette. 96(4): 676-708. [3076]
  • 38. Bryant, William S.; Wharton, Mary E.; Martin, William H.; Varner, Johnnie B. 1980. The blue ash-oak savanna--woodland, a remnant of presettlement vegetation in the Inner Bluegrass of Kentucky. Castanea. 45(3): 149-165. [10375]
  • 55. Curtis, John T. 1959. Southern forests--xeric. In: The vegetation of Wisconsin. Madison, WI: The University of Wisconsin Press: 132-155. [60519]
  • 60. Diggs, George M., Jr.; Lipscomb, Barney L.; O'Kennon, Robert J. 1999. Illustrated flora of north-central Texas. Sida Botanical Miscellany, No. 16. Fort Worth, TX: Botanical Research Institute of Texas. 1626 p. [35698]
  • 63. Duncan, Wilbur H.; Duncan, Marion B. 1988. Trees of the southeastern United States. Athens, GA: The University of Georgia Press. 322 p. [12764]
  • 68. Farrar, John Laird. 1995. Trees of the northern United States and Canada. Ames, IA: Blackwell Publishing. 502 p. [60614]
  • 90. Great Plains Flora Association. 1986. Flora of the Great Plains. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas. 1392 p. [1603]
  • 93. Guyette, Richard P.; Muzika, Rose-Marie; Kabrick, John; Stambaugh, Michael C. 2004. A perspective on Quercus life history characteristics and forest disturbance. In: Spetich, Martin A., ed. Upland oak ecology symposium: history, current conditions, and sustainability: Proceedings; 2002 October 7-10;Fayetteville, AR. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-73. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station: 138-142. [82156]
  • 99. Harrison, A. Tyrone. 1980. The Niobrara Valley Preserve: its biogeographic importance and description of its biotic communities. Unpublished report to the Nature Conservancy. On file at: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Research Station, Fire Sciences Laboratory, Missoula, MT. 116 p. [5736]
  • 118. Hosie, R. C. 1969. Native trees of Canada. 7th ed. Ottawa, ON: Canadian Forestry Service, Department of Fisheries and Forestry. 380 p. [3375]
  • 121. Hunter, Carl G. 1989. Trees, shrubs, and vines of Arkansas. Little Rock, AR: The Ozark Society Foundation. 207 p. [21266]
  • 125. Johnson, Paul S. 1990. Quercus macrocarpa Michx. bur oak. In: Burns, Russell M.; Honkala, Barbara H., technical coordinators. Silvics of North America. Volume 2. Hardwoods. Agric. Handb. 654. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service: 686-692. [82254]
  • 140. Koenig, Walter D.; Knops, Johannes M. H.; Dickinson, Janis L.; Zuckerberg, Benjamin. 2009. Latitudinal decrease in acorn size in bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa) is due to environmental constraints, not avian dispersal. Botany. 87(4): 349-356. [75465]
  • 144. Laing, Charles L. 1966. Bur oak seed size and shadiness of habitat in southeastern Nebraska. The American Midland Naturalist. 76(2): 534-536. [82160]
  • 211. Scoggan, H. J. 1978. The flora of Canada. Part 3: Dicotyledoneae (Saururaceae to Violaceae). National Museum of Natural Sciences: Publications in Botany, No. 7(3). Ottawa: National Museums of Canada. 1115 p. [75493]
  • 222. Simpson, Benny J. 1988. A field guide to Texas trees. Austin, TX: Texas Monthly Press. 372 p. [11708]
  • 225. Sprackling, John A.; Read, Ralph A. 1979. Tree root systems in eastern Nebraska. Nebraska Conservation Bulletin Number 37. Lincoln, NE: The University of Nebraska, Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Conservation and Survey Division. 71 p. [50196]
  • 234. Stephens, H. A. 1973. Woody plants of the north Central Plains. Lawrence, KS: The University Press of Kansas. 530 p. [3804]
  • 237. Strausbaugh, P. D.; Core, Earl L. 1977. Flora of West Virginia. 2nd ed. Morgantown, WV: Seneca Books. 1079 p. [23213]
  • 262. Weaver, J. E.; Kramer, Joseph. 1932. Root system of Quercus macrocarpa in relation to the invasion of prairie. Botanical Gazette. 94: 51-85. [274]
  • 274. Yeager, A. F. 1935. Root systems of certain trees and shrubs grown on prairie soils. Journal of Agricultural Research. 51(12): 1085-1092. [3748]
  • 29. Booth, W. E.; Wright, J. C. 1962. [Revised]. Flora of Montana: Part II--Dicotyledons. Bozeman, MT: Montana State College, Department of Botany and Bacteriology. 280 p. [47286]
  • 72. Flora of North America Editorial Committee, eds. 2011. Flora of North America North of Mexico, [Online]. Flora of North America Association (Producer). Available: http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1. [36990]

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Diagnostic Description

This is Montana's only native oak.

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Synonym

Quercus macrocarpa var. depressa (Nuttall) Engelmann; Q. mandanensis Rydberg
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Ecology

Habitat

Range and Habitat in Illinois

Bur Oak is a common tree that is found in every county of Illinois. Habitats include moist bottomland woodlands, upland woodlands, and savannas where deciduous trees are dominant. This tree is most commonly found in bottomland woodlands a little outside of the flood zone. It also occurs in savannas and can be an invader of prairies because of its resistance to fire. Occasionally, Bur Oak is cultivated as a landscape tree, where it can become quite large.
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© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

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Habitat and Ecology

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Site Characteristics and Plant Communities

More info for the terms: association, codominant, cover, fire exclusion, fuel, mesic, presence, shrub, succession, swamp, tree, xeric

In North America, bur oak is most common at elevations of less than 3,300 feet (1,000 m) [72] but tolerates a range of climatic and soil conditions. Bur oak occupies habitats ranging from moist woodlands and bottomland forests to prairies and sandhills [211]. In the western and northern parts of its range, bur oak size and growth form may vary with site conditions. In moist woodlands and on alluvial floodplains, bur oak often grows as a tree up to 160 feet (50 m) tall but on dry uplands and bluffs, it may grow as a shrub less than 16 feet (5 m) tall [72,87]. In north-central Nebraska's Niobrara Valley Preserve, bur oak reaches only 20 feet (6 m) tall on dry sites but may reach 50 feet (15 m) tall on moist floodplains [99]. Additional bur oak characteristics that can vary by site and distribution are discussed in the Botanical description.

Climate: Bur oak is one of the most cold tolerant of the North American oak species [72]. In one of its northernmost habitats, south-central New Brunswick, bur oak abundance is greatest where the annual growing-day temperature exceeds 40 °F (5 °C) and there are about 150 frost-free days [167]. In bur oak's northwestern range, the average growing season may be only 100 days, but in southern Illinois and Indiana, where bur oak development is considered best, the growing season is 190 days (review by [125]).

Bur oak tolerates a range of moisture regimes. During a severe 7-year drought in the Great Plains, researchers monitoring injury and mortality in the area reported that bur oak "endured drought especially well" [9]. Annual precipitation can be as low as 15 inches (380 mm) in bur oak's northwestern range, while in its southern range annual precipitation can exceed 50 inches (1,270 mm) (review by [125]).

Soils: While bur oak tolerates harsh soil conditions, including poor, dry soils and wet, poorly drained or inundated soils [72,132], bur oak distribution is not necessarily dictated by soil characteristics. Soils in western bur oak habitats are generally Mollisols, in northern habitats are Spodosols, and in central and southern habitats are Alfisols [125]. Although studies have related bur oak's presence and abundance to soil moisture conditions [6,155], comparing soil characteristics without information on past disturbances, land use, and successional change on all but the harshest sites may erroneously indicate bur oak-soil relationships. In a study of structure, composition, and environmental relationships in an oak savanna remnant in northwestern Ohio, researchers predicted bur oak occurrence as a function of disturbance and not of moisture or drainage regimes [27]. Survey records, other historical records, and soil and topographic factors in the Big Woods region of south-central Minnesota indicated that firebreaks (bodies of water and rough topography) were the primary reason for observed vegetation patterns. Bur oak dominated woodlands that experienced frequent fire regardless of soil characteristics [91]. For more on the importance of disturbances and succession on bur oak, see Succession in the absence of fire and Disturbance-related succession.

Although tolerant of some inundation, bur oak does not tolerate prolonged flooding. At Lake Oahe, South Dakota, a field trial showed that bur oak survived at least 2 weeks of growing-season inundation [116]. However, in the northern part of the Mississippi Delta, bur oak is often killed by high water during the growing season. Details about duration of flooding and saturation were not provided [194]. On permanently flooded sites, bur oak trees died within 3 years (review by [125]).

Plant communities and related site characteristics: Bur oak is often a dominant savanna or woodland species in the Great Plains and Great Lakes regions. The Society of American Foresters recognizes western [64] and eastern bur oak forest cover types [65], where bur oak occurs in pure or nearly pure stands. Bur oak savannas are reported nearly throughout the Great Plains and Great Lakes regions [16,142,201,209]. Other wide-ranging forest types in which bur oak is a dominant or codominant include northern oak-hickory (Carya spp.) forests [33,261] and bur oak-chinkapin oak communities [170].

In many cases, time, disturbances, and successional change are more important than climate or site characteristics in determining which type of bur oak community occurs. The exception may be in extremely harsh sites, where shade-tolerant tree species fail to establish and replace bur oak. In the absence of fire or other disturbances, an oak savanna typically transitions into an oak woodland and then to a mixed-deciduous woodland. This transition is described in more detail in the section on Succession in the absence of fire.

Some of the communities discussed below are considered "imperiled" because of their rarity or other factors making them vulnerable to extinction [209] (see Other Management Considerations). Other communities are rare because of land conversions, successional changes, and fire exclusion associated with European settlement [38]. In some communities, plant associates of bur oak may now be more rare than at the time of the vegetation survey and subsequent publication. For example, Dutch elm disease and phloem necrosis have resulted in high morality levels for American elm (Ulmus americana) [17,162], and shagbark hickory (C. ovata) has been extensively harvested for fuel wood [89].

Northern Great Plains: In the Northern Great Plains, bur oak is common in mixed-conifer forests, deciduous forests, oak and oak-hickory woodlands, oak savannas, and oak shrubland associations. Bur oak is common in bottomlands with rich soils but also occurs on open rocky hillsides with poor soils [234]. In mixed-conifer and mixed-deciduous forest types in the Black Hills of Wyoming and South Dakota, soils are typically sandy loams to clay loams, of calcareous or igneous origin, with pH levels of 5.3 to 7.4 and organic matter contents of 3.6% to 9.5% [216]. Bur oak stands and habitat types at the extreme western part of its range are commonly found at elevations of about 2,300 to 5,300 feet (700-1,600 m) [216,259].

  • Mixed-conifer forests: The most common bur oak associate in Northern Great Plains mixed-conifer forests is ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), but in southwestern Manitoba, bur oak occurs as a shrub in a white spruce (Picea canadensis)-deciduous forest type [22]. Ponderosa pine-bur oak forest types are described in Montana, Wyoming, and South Dakota [11,115,209,216], often within the Black Hills [244,260]. In South Dakota, ponderosa pine-bur oak forests are described on very acidic soils [244].
  • Mixed-deciduous woodlands: On upper floodplain terraces, woody draws, or other mesic sites in the Northern Great Plains, bur oak is common in mixed-deciduous woodlands. Common associates include American elm [135,259], eastern hophornbeam (Ostrya virginiana) [96,216], paper birch (Betula papyrifera) [96,232], basswood (Tilia americana) [205,209], quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) [85,86,158,259], and green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) [135,259]. On North Dakota's Missouri River floodplain, bur oak trees, saplings, and seedlings were restricted to the outer high terraces of the floodplain where soils were the most developed and had the greatest nutrient availability, organic matter content, and water availability [129]. In southwestern Manitoba, bur oak occupies clayey soils in cottonwood (Populus spp.)-dominated uplands [22].
  • Oak and oak-hickory savannas and woodlands: Bur oak-dominated savannas and woodlands are described throughout the Northern Great Plains. In Manitoba, the Dakotas, and Wyoming, bur oak may be the only overstory species [42,209,220] or may codominate with northern pin oak (Q. ellipsoidalis) [209]. In bur oak woodlands in the Black Hills of South Dakota, soils were neutral to alkaline, 19% or more clay, and sometimes more than 20% gravel [220]. In Nebraska and Iowa, oak and oak-hickory woodlands and savannas are common along the Missouri and lower Platte rivers. Common associates include chinkapin oak, black oak (Q. velutina) [47], shingle oak (Q. imbricaria) [162], northern red oak (Q. borealis) [205], shagbark hickory [47], and bitternut hickory (C. cordiformis) [205].
  • Bur oak shrublands: In draws, riparian areas, or heavily grazed sites in the Northern Great Plains, bur oak may grow as a tree or shrub among other shrub species. Common associates include western snowberry (Symphoricarpos occidentalis) [11,115,216,232], hazelnut (Corylus spp.) [85,86,209], chokecherry (Prunus virginiana) [84,85,86,209], Saskatoon serviceberry (Amelanchier alnifolia) [209], and sumac (Rhus spp.) [101]. In Manitoba and Minnesota, researchers describe a quaking aspen-bur oak-willow (Salix spp.) shrubland type [209].

Southern Great Plains: In the Southern Great Plains region, bur oak is common in mixed-deciduous woodlands, oak and oak-hickory woodlands, and oak savannas. These communities are common in floodplain areas.

  • Mixed-deciduous woodlands: A variety of associated species can occur with bur oak in deciduous woodlands in the Southern Great Plains. Hackberry (Celtis occidentalis)-bur oak gallery forests are described in the Flint Hills of northeastern Kansas [4]. A bur oak-American elm-white ash (F. americana) floodplain type occurs in the Niobrara Valley in north-central Nebraska [99]. In bottomlands in Webster County, Nebraska, bur oak occurs with white mulberry (Morus alba), green ash, and silver maple (Acer saccharinum) [206]. In Texas, bur oak is rarely dominant and is primarily restricted to floodplains, bottomlands, or other riparian areas [73,243]. In these areas, sugarberry (C. laevigata) is a typical dominant [174,181,196]. Some botanists indicate that bur oak is most common in areas of Texas with limestone soils [60].
  • Oak and oak-hickory savannas and woodlands: Bur oak, mixed-oak, and oak-hickory savannas and woodlands are described in Nebraska, Missouri, Kansas, and Oklahoma. In the savannas, bur oak may dominate the canopy alone or with chinkapin oak. Big bluestem (Andropogon gerardii) is the typical grass associate [148,209]. In oak woodlands, bur oak often shares the canopy with other oaks such as pin oak (Q. palustris), swamp white oak [209], or chinkapin oak. In the Flint Hills of northeastern Kansas, bur oak is most common on the most mesic lowland sites [4]. The growth rate of bur oak was correlated with low topographic slope (r = 0.5) and low soil nitrogen (r = 0.7) (P<0.05) [2]. Oak-hickory woodlands dominated by bur oak are most commonly found on floodplains or other mesic sites [114,148,209]; however, the bur oak-shagbark hickory type occurs on xeric slopes and hilltops and represents the most xerophytic forest association in eastern Nebraska [8].

Great Lakes: In the Great Lakes region, the abundance and area of bur oak habitats declined dramatically with European settlement (see Local distribution changes above). Bur oak was common in frequently burned prairies and savannas. Based on Land Office Survey records from McLean County, Illinois, bur oak was most important in prairies, next most important in savannas, then in open forests, and was least important in closed forests (Rogers and Anderson 1979 as cited in [50]). Persistence of bur oak-dominated habitats depends on fire or other disturbances that limit the establishment of less fire-tolerant and more shade-tolerant woodland species.

  • Mixed-deciduous woodlands: Bur oak is possible in a variety of deciduous woodland types, but rarely is it a canopy dominant. Deciduous woodlands with bur oak typically develop from unburned or undisturbed savannas. In the absence of frequent fire or other continual disturbances, thickets of shade-tolerant trees develop in the savanna. Bur oak reproduction fails in the heavy shade. Large bur oak trees remain until their death, but these trees are widely spaced and fail to dominate the canopy. In Minnesota bur oak was important in deciduous forest types with red oak, red maple [143], or quaking aspen [40,95]. In quaking aspen stands in Itasca State Park in north-central Minnesota, bur oak trees, saplings, and seedlings were generally absent from dry, nutrient-poor and moist, nutrient-rich sites and were restricted to intermediate sites [95].
  • Oak savannas and woodlands: Bur oak savannas or grove types are reported throughout the Great Lakes region [53,155,199]. Bur oak often dominates dry calcareous savannas [43,198,199,266]. On these limestone sites, soils may have moderate nutrient levels, pH levels of 7 to 7.5, loam or silt loam textures, and be shallow or excessively drained [266]. In Wisconsin, however, bur oak was reported on acid sands, deep silt loams, moist peatlands, mesic uplands, dry rocky cliffs, and glacial moraines, as well as thin rocky calcareous soils [55]. In Minnesota, bur oak and northern pin oak codominate a grove type near Itasca Park [40]. In Wisconsin, bur oak dominates savannas and codominates dry forest types with black oak [53].

Northeastern United States: Bur oak is much less common in the northeastern United States and southeastern Canada than in the Great Plains and Great Lakes regions.

  • Mixed-deciduous woodlands: In the Northeast, bur oak can occur, although rarely as a dominant, in maple-beech (Fagus spp.)-basswood, oak-hickory, and northern hardwood-conifer community types occupying wet mesic bottomlands to xeric uplands [1,175,176].

Southern Appalachians: The information available on bur oak habitats in the southern Appalachians is very limited. In Virginia, bur oak is not frequent but is described on calcareous soils [270].

  • Mixed-deciduous woodlands: In Kentucky, a blue ash (Fraxinus quadrangulata)-oak savanna woodland including bur oak occurred in the Inner Bluegrass area [38].

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  • 196. Reid, M.; Schulz, K.; Schindel, M.; Comer, P.; Kittel, G.; [and others], compilers. 2000. International classification of ecological communities: Terrestrial vegetation of the western United States--Chihuahuan Desert subset. Report from Biological Conservation Datasystem and working draft of April 23, 2000. Boulder, CO: Association for Biodiversity Information/The Nature Conservancy, Community Ecology Group. 154 p. In: Southwestern Regional Gap Analysis Project. Reston, VA: U.S. Geological Survey, Gap Analysis Program (Producer). Available online: http://fws-nmcfwru.nmsu.edu/swregap/nm/Chihuahua.pdf [2005, May 6]. [52906]
  • 199. Reschke, Carol; Reid, Ron; Jones, Judith; Feeney, Tom; Potter, Heather, comps. 1999. Conserving Great Lakes alvars. Final technical report of the International Alvar Conservation Initiative. Chicago, IL: The Nature Conservancy. 230 p. Available online: http://www.epa.gov/ecopage/shore/alvars/alvar.pdf [2011, January 19]. [80830]
  • 209. Schneider, Rick E.; Faber-Langendoen, Don; Crawford, Rex C.; Weakley, Alan S. 1997. The status of biodiversity in the Great Plains: Great Plains vegetation classification--Supplemental document 1, [Online]. [Cooperative Agreement # X 007803-01-3]. In: Ostlie, Wayne R.; Schneider, Rick E.; Aldrich, Janette Marie; Faust, Thomas M.; McKim, Robert L. B.; Chaplin, Stephen J., comps. The status of biodiversity in the Great Plains. Arlington, VA: The Nature Conservancy, Great Plains Program (Producer). 75 p. Available: http://conserveonline.org/docs/2005/02/greatplains_vegclass_97.pdf [2006, May 16]. [62020]

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Soils and Topography

Bur oak on uplands is often associated with calcareous soils. In  the "driftless" area of southwestern Wisconsin, it is  commonly found on limestone ridges; in Kentucky, it is more  prevalent on limestone soils than on soils derived from shales  and sandstone (5). In western Iowa, it can be found as a dominant  on soils of either limestone or sandstone origin. Throughout much  of the prairie region of the Midwest, bur oak is found on  droughty sandy plains, black prairie loams, and on loamy slopes   of south and west exposure. Toward the western edge of its range,  such as in eastern Kansas, it is more abundant on the more moist  north-facing slopes than on southfacing slopes (2). Bur oak often  dominates severe sites with thin soils, heavy claypan soils,  gravelly ridges, and coarse-textured loessial hills. The  predominant soil orders on which bur oak is found include  Alfisols in the central and southern parts of its range, and  Mollisols and Spodosols in the western and northern parts of its  range, respectively.

    Bur oak is also an important bottom-land species throughout much  of its range. In the Central States Region and southward, it is  found on moist flats and on hummocky bottoms. Northward, in  southern Michigan, it has been found in high densities on  slightly elevated ridges within wet bottom-land forests occupying  old glacial lake beds and drainage ways (20).

    Bur oak frequently forms a fringe between the prairie and upland  forest in northern Illinois and eastern Iowa, notably at the  outer edges of "breaks" and bluffs along streams and  around limestone outcrops. It is a valuable timber species on  favorable bottom-land sites within this region.

    Within the Great Plains Region, it is frequently found in stream  bottoms and stream terraces. In North Dakota, bur oak is a major  component of the flood-plain forests of the Missouri River (11).  Here it may predominate in old stands on high terraces near the  edge of the flood plain. It is absent in low terraces near the  center of the flood plain. Along adjacent draws and upper slopes,  it becomes the first tree established along prairie edges. Bluffs  along the Missouri River and its tributaries in eastern Nebraska  are frequently covered with bur oaks that range in size from  small trees near the base of bluffs to shrublike growth near the  top.

    In the Black Hills of western South Dakota and the Bear Lodge  Mountains of northeastern Wyoming, bur oak grows at low  elevations between the ponderosa pine forest and the grasslands  (21). Here, it ranges in size from a shrub under a pine canopy at  higher elevations to a tree up to 21 m (69 ft) tall along stream  bottoms at lower elevations.

  • Burns, Russell M., and Barbara H. Honkala, technical coordinators. 1990. Silvics of North America: 1. Conifers; 2. Hardwoods.   Agriculture Handbook 654 (Supersedes Agriculture Handbook 271,Silvics of Forest Trees of the United States, 1965).   U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Washington, DC. vol.2, 877 pp.   http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/silvics_manual/table_of_contents.htm External link.
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Paul S. Johnson

Source: Silvics of North America

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Climate

Bur oak is one of the most drought resistant of the North American  oaks. In the northwestern part of its range, the average annual  precipitation is as low as 380 mm (15 in). Here, the average  minimum temperature is 4° C (40° F), and the average  growing season lasts only 100 days. To the south bur oak grows in  areas having an average precipitation exceeding 1270 mm (50 in)  per year, minimum temperatures of -7° C (20° F), and a  growing season of 260 days. The best development of the bur oak  occurs in southern Illinois and Indiana, where the average annual  precipitation is about 1140 mm (45 in), minimum temperature is  -29° C (-20° F), and the growing season is 190 days  (5).

  • Burns, Russell M., and Barbara H. Honkala, technical coordinators. 1990. Silvics of North America: 1. Conifers; 2. Hardwoods.   Agriculture Handbook 654 (Supersedes Agriculture Handbook 271,Silvics of Forest Trees of the United States, 1965).   U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Washington, DC. vol.2, 877 pp.   http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/silvics_manual/table_of_contents.htm External link.
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Paul S. Johnson

Source: Silvics of North America

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Bottomlands, riparian slopes, poorly drained areas, prairies, usually on limestone or calcareous clays (in nw part of range on dry slopes and ridges, prairies); 0-1000m.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

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Dispersal

Establishment

Minimum seed-bearing age is 35, with optimum seed production occurring between 75–150 years, and trees are known to produce seed up to 400 years. Abundant acorns are produced every 2–3 years, with light crops in the intervals. Most natural seed germination occurs during the fall (directly after maturation) and unless germination is rapid, few seeds survive predation by insects, small birds, and mammals. Litter-covered acorns appear to be more vulnerable to rodents, insects, and fungus.

The taproot of young bur oaks rapidly penetrates into the soil, sometimes growing more than one meter deep in the first growing season. This early root development, along with high water-use efficiency, may explain why bur oak can pioneer on droughty sites and can successfully establish itself in competition with prairie shrubs and grasses. The trees are slow-growing but long-lived and may reach ages approaching 1000 years.

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USDA NRCS National Plant Data Center & the Biota of North America Program

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

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Associations

Faunal Associations

Like other oaks, the value of Bur Oak to wildlife is quite high. The leaves are eaten by the caterpillars of several butterflies, specifically Calycopis cecrops (Red-Banded Hairstreak), Fixsenia favonius ontario (Northern Hairstreak), Parrhasius m-album (White-M Hairstreak), Satyrium calanus falacer (Banded Hairstreak), and Satyrium liparops strigosum (Striped Hairstreak); the caterpillars of the skippers Erynnis brizo (Sleepy Duskywing) and Erynnis juvenalis (Juvenal's Duskywing) also feed on the leaves. In addition, the caterpillars of probably several hundred moths feed on the foliage and other parts of oaks; the Moth Table lists several of these species. Another major group of insect feeders consists of Long-Horned beetles (Cerambycidae) and closely related beetles, whose larvae bore through the wood or bark of oaks. The Long-Horned Beetle Table lists many of these species. Bur Oak and other oaks are among the major hosts of treehoppers (Membracidae); the Treehopper Table lists species that often feed on these trees. Other insect feeders include plant bugs (Miridae), leaf beetles (Chrysomelidae), the Oak Lace Bug (Corythucha arcuata), the Northern Walkingstick (Diapheromera femoratum), the larvae of weevils (Curculionidae), and insects from other families (see Insect Table). Many of these insects are eaten by insectivorous songbirds. The acorns of oaks are an important food source of several birds; these species include the Wood Duck, Mallard, Ruffed Grouse, Ring-Necked Pheasant, Greater Prairie Chicken, Bobwhite Quail, Wild Turkey, Passenger Pigeon (now extinct), Monk Parakeet (introduced from abroad), Blue Jay, White-Breasted Nuthatch, Tufted Titmouse, Pileated Woodpecker, Red-Bellied Woodpecker, Red-Headed Woodpecker, and others. Among mammals, the Black Bear, Raccoon, Fox Squirrel, Gray Squirrel, Red Squirrel, Southern Flying Squirrel, Eastern Chipmunk, and White-Footed Mouse are all avid consumers of acorns. Because of their large size and reduced bitterness from low tannins, the acorns of Bur Oak, in particular, are an important food source for these mammals. White-Tailed Deer and domesticated cattle browse on the twigs, leaves, and acorns of oaks, while the Cottontail Rabbit browses on the bark, twigs, and leaves of young saplings. Oak trees provide nesting habitat for such birds as the Northern Parula, Blue-Gray Gnatcatcher, Yellow-Throated Vireo, Summer Tanager, Red-Tailed Hawk, and Swainson's Hawk; the cavities of older trees provide dens for tree squirrels and Screech Owls. Photographic Location
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© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

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Associated Forest Cover

Because of its tolerance to a wide range of soil and moisture  conditions, bur oak is an associate of many other trees. In pure  or nearly pure stands, it forms the forest cover type Bur Oak  (Society of American Foresters Type 42, eastern forests; Type  236, western forests) (6). It is also an important associate in  six other types: Northern Pin Oak (Type 14), Aspen (Type 16),  Black Ash-American Elm-Red Maple (Type 39), White Oak (Type 53),  Pin Oak-Sweetgum (Type 65), and Hawthorn (Type 109).

    In southern bottom-land cover types such as Pin Oak-Sweetgum,  important associates of bur oak are pin oak (Quercus  palustris), sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua), red  maple (Acer rubrum), American elm (Ulmus americana),  blackgum (Nyssa sylvatica), swamp white oak (Quercus  bicolor), willow oak (Q. phellos), overcup oak (Q.  lyrata), green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica), Nuttall  oak (Quercus nuttallii), swamp chestnut oak (Q.  michauxii), white oak (Q. alba), shellbark hickory  (Carya laciniosa), and shagbark hickory (C. ovata).  Associated shrubs and vines on these sites include possumhaw  (Ilex decidua), poison-ivy (Toxicodendron radicans),  and trumpetcreeper (Campsis radicans).

    In more northerly bottom-land types, such as Black Ash-American  Elm-Red Maple, important associates of bur oak include black ash  (Fraxinus nigra), American elm, red maple, American  basswood (Tilia americana), silver maple (Acer  saccharinum), swamp white oak, sycamore (Platanus  occidentalis), and eastern cottonwood (Populus  deltoides). Common shrub associates include speckled alder  (Alnus rugosa), vacciniums (Vaccinium spp.),  red-osier dogwood (Cornus stolonifera), and poison-sumac  (Toxicodendron vernix).

    Important associates of bur oak in the cover type White Oak  include northern red oak (Quercus rubra), black oak (Q.  uelutina), chestnut oak (Q. prinus), scarlet  oak (Q. coccinea), and post oak (Q. stellata),  mockernut hickory (Carya tomentosa), pignut hickory  (C. glabra), and bitternut hickory (C. cordiformis).  In this type, associated shrubs and vines include vacciniums,  sumacs (Rhus spp.), witch-hazel (Hamamelis  uirginiana), wild grape (Vitis spp.), Virginia  creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia), and poison-ivy.

    On the drier sites in the northwestern part of its range, bur oak  grows in mixed stands of American elm, green ash, bitternut  hickory, and white oak, and sometimes as nearly pure oak stands.  In North Dakota, for example, the cover type Bur Oak accounts for  about 19 percent of the forest land. Bur oak is also the major  tree of oak savannas ("oak openings") of the  prairie-forest transition zone in Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, and  Illinois (3,5,8,12).

    Shrubs are especially abundant in the bur oak forest of the plains  region. Predominant among them are American hazelnut (Corylus  americana), coralberry (Symphoricarpos orbiculatus), and  smooth sumac (Rhus glabra); common associates on the  prairie borders are hawthorn (Crataegus spp.), wolfberry  (Symphoricarpos occidentalis), and prairie crabapple (Malus  ioensis).

  • Burns, Russell M., and Barbara H. Honkala, technical coordinators. 1990. Silvics of North America: 1. Conifers; 2. Hardwoods.   Agriculture Handbook 654 (Supersedes Agriculture Handbook 271,Silvics of Forest Trees of the United States, 1965).   U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Washington, DC. vol.2, 877 pp.   http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/silvics_manual/table_of_contents.htm External link.
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Paul S. Johnson

Source: Silvics of North America

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Diseases and Parasites

Damaging Agents

Bur oak is attacked by several insects  including the following defoliators: redhumped oakworm (Symmerista  canicosta) in the Northeast, S. albifrons in the  South, oak webworm (Archips fervidana), oak skeletonizer  (Bucculatrix recognita), a leaf miner (Profenusa  lucifex), variable oakleaf caterpillar (Heterocampa  manteo), June beetles (Phyllophaga spp.), and oak  lacebug (Corythucha arcuata) (1,5). The latter species  may heavily defoliate bur oaks in shelterbelt plantings,  especially during dry weather. Attacks from bur oak kermes (Kermes  pubescens) may distort leaves and kill twigs of bur oak.

    Oak wilt (Ceratocystis fagacearum) is a less serious  problem in bur oak than in members of the red oak group (5,10).  Although spread of the disease from infected bur oak to adjacent  oaks is infrequent, the disease sometimes spreads through root  grafts, and entire groves have been killed by the gradual  expansion of the disease from one center of infection.

    Bur oak is susceptible to attack by the cotton root rot (Phymatotrichum  omnivorum) and Strumella canker (Strumella coryneoidea).  Half of the trees in a 20-year-old plantation in Pennsylvania  became infected with the latter disease; and nearly a fourth of  these died. Other fungi that have been isolated from diseased  parts of bur oak include Dothiorella canker and dieback (Dothiorella  quercina), Phoma canker (Phoma aposphaerioides), Coniothyrium  dieback (Coniothyrium truncisedum), and shoestring root  rot (Armillaria mellea).

    Large bur oak trees are resistant to injury by fire and this,  together with resistance to drought and disease, probably account  for maintenance of the bur oak "openings" over much of  southern Wisconsin at the time of homesteading. The presence of  large bur oaks in the sugar maple-basswood community of the Big  Woods of Minnesota has been attributed to the tree's thick  fire-resistant bark, which enabled it to survive repeated burning  and freed it from competition by less fire-resistant species (5).

    In the northwest part of its range, bur oak is considered a  drought-resistant tree. During severe drought conditions in Iowa,  unpastured bur oak stands on dry, exposed slopes were not  injured; however, in pastured woods, drought injury occurred,  even on protected sites. This was attributed to reduced aeration  (caused by trampling) that had limited the growth and efficiency  of absorbing roots.

    Bur oak is not resistant to flooding, and in two areas where it  was permanently flooded it died within 3 years. The species  tolerates urban pollution better than most oaks.

  • Burns, Russell M., and Barbara H. Honkala, technical coordinators. 1990. Silvics of North America: 1. Conifers; 2. Hardwoods.   Agriculture Handbook 654 (Supersedes Agriculture Handbook 271,Silvics of Forest Trees of the United States, 1965).   U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Washington, DC. vol.2, 877 pp.   http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/silvics_manual/table_of_contents.htm External link.
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Paul S. Johnson

Source: Silvics of North America

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General Ecology

Fire Management Considerations

More info for the terms: cover, density, fire frequency, fire management, fire severity, frequency, fuel, invasive species, mesic, natural, nonnative species, prescribed fire, restoration, severity, shrub

Oak savannas are among the most threatened habitats in the Great Lakes region, and their restoration will require fire (review by [136]). Cost and effort of restoration with fire will likely be less if implemented before sites are fully converted to dense, mesic, closed-canopy forests. Several prescribed fire programs and fire studies are available [67,190,192,221] and can be used as guides, although adaptations may be necessary to meet local objectives. In some cases, nonnative species and threatened and endangered species need special consideration in the development of a fire management program.

In the Midwest, millions of acres of what were oak savannas are now mesic, closed-canopy forests. The potential for restoring these forests with fire is limited by their reduced flammability. Seed sources of the once dominant, fire-adapted species may be lacking, and abundance of nonnative invasive species can be high. Opportunities for fire restoration are best in oak- or oak and pine-dominated woodlands. Large contiguous areas of ownership should be restoration priorities because the ability to burn larger areas maximizes cost benefit and allows for variable fire behavior [182].

Observations during and after spring prescribed fires in oak savannas on the Sherburne National Wildlife Refuge in Minnesota revealed that bur oak trees encroaching into grasslands were easily top-killed by fire occurring when air temperature was 80 °F (27 °C) or more and relative humidity was less than 25% [186]. Based on findings from prescribed fire studies in the Cedar Creek Natural History Area, researchers suggest that restoration of "degraded" oak savannas begin with annual burning, which may need to be coupled with mechanical stand thinning, to reduce overstory density. Fire intervals may be lengthened to 2 or more years after the overstory and understory are opened [190]. Prescribed fire results in Meade County, South Dakota, caused researchers to think that increased fire severity and larger burned areas may be necessary to encourage bur oak reproduction. Because their spring prescribed fire did not increase bur oak seedling establishment, researchers suggested several prescription changes to increase fire severity and fire size: 1) burn in the fall instead of the spring, so that grasses are not matted from melted snow, 2) burn after a killing frost to reduce green grass cover to less than 25%, 3) remove grazing to increase fine fuel loads to over 1,500 pounds (700 kg)/ha, and 4) wait for wind speeds of 8 miles (13 km)/hour or more [221].

Prescribed fire considerations: Sensitive and nonnative species are important to consider in the fire management of oak habitats. Insects may also require consideration. In the Upper Midwest, bur oak dominates dry calcareous savannas, where the density and cover of woody vegetation have increased with decreased fire frequency. These habitats are important to many endangered, threatened, or species of concern in Wisconsin [266], which need to be considered before reintroducing fire. Although threatened savanna species are likely adapted to fire, increases in woody fuels may produce fire behaviors and severities different from what occurred historically.

In Wisconsin, reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea), nonnative honeysuckles (Lonicera spp.), and common buckthorn add to the complexity of managing bur oak habitats with fire. In south-central Wisconsin, reed canarygrass forms dense monotypic stands that "appear very shade tolerant and highly competitive" [105]. In an attempt to restore oak svannas and reduce nonnative shrub dominance at the University of Wisconsin Arboretum, thinning, burning, herbicide treatments, and native species plantings were utilized. The understory in the Arboretum was dominated by dense honeysuckle and common buckthorn. None of the treatments, alone or in combination, eliminated common buckthorn. Common buckthorn increased in thinned plots. Although common buckthorn cover was reduced on plots burned twice in 2 years, it was not reduced on plots burned only once in 2 years (P<0.05), and common buckthorn stem densities were not altered significantly [212].

At the Cedar Creek Natural History Area, lace bugs (Corythuca arcuata), which are bur oak specialists, were significantly more abundant in frequently burned than unburned areas (P<0.01). Light available to bur oak branches was significantly greater in burned than unburned areas (P=0.07), and lace bug abundance increased with increasing light availability [134]. Arthropod communities on bur oak bark also differed with fire frequency at the Cedar Creek Natural History Area. Some arthropod taxa were sensitive to frequent fire, and some were not. The number of arthropod species living on bur oak bark was greatest in unburned areas and least on areas burned frequently (20 fires in 25 years) [180].

  • 266. Will-Wolfe, Susan; Stearns, Forest. 1998. Characterization of dry site oak savanna in the Upper Midwest. Transactions of the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters. 86: 223-234. [39626]
  • 67. Faber-Langendoen, Don; Davis, Mark A. 1995. Effects of fire frequency on tree canopy cover at Allison Savanna, eastcentral Minnesota, USA. Natural Areas Journal. 15(4): 319-328. [26527]
  • 105. Henderson, Richard A. 1991. Reed canary grass poses threat to oak savanna restoration and maintenance. Restoration & Management Notes. 9(1): 32. [15451]
  • 134. Kay, Adam D.; Schade, John D.; Ogdahl, Megan; Wesserle, Eleonore O.; Hobbie, Sarah E. 2007. Fire effects on insect herbivores in an oak savanna: the role of light and nutrients. Ecological Entomology. 32(6): 754-761. [70287]
  • 136. Keane, Robert E.; Agee, James K.; Fule, Peter; Keeley, Jon E.; Key, Carl; Kitchen, Stanley G.; Miller, Richard; Schulte, Lisa A. 2008. Ecological effects of large fires on US landscapes: benefit or catastrophe? International Journal of Wildland Fire. 17: 696-712. [73387]
  • 180. Nicolai, Volker. 1991. Reactions of the fauna on the bark of trees to the frequency of fires in a North American savanna. Oecologia. 88(1): 132-137. [16715]
  • 182. Nowacki, Gregory J.; Abrams, Marc D. 2008. The demise of fire and "mesophication" of forests in the eastern United States. BioScience. 58(2): 123-138. [70112]
  • 186. Papike, R. V. 1984. Experimental burns, reintroductions in savanna restoration project (Minnesota). Restoration & Management Notes. 2(2): 73. [50403]
  • 190. Peterson, David W.; Reich, Peter B. 2001. Prescribed fire in oak savanna: fire frequency effects on stand structure and dynamics. Ecological Applications. 11(3): 914-927. [39627]
  • 192. Peterson, David Wassell. 1998. Fire effects on oak savanna and woodland vegetation in Minnesota. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota. 130 p. Dissertation. [82453]
  • 212. Scriver, Bryn Muree. 2005. Consequences of oak savanna restoration techniques on the re-invasion of non-native invasive shrubs, particularly Rhamnus cathartica L. (common buckthorn). Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin-Madison. 153 p. Thesis. [80743]
  • 221. Sieg, Carolyn Hull; Wright, Henry A. 1996. The role of prescribed burning in regenerating Quercus macrocarpa and associated woody plants in stringer woodlands in the Black Hills, South Dakota. International Journal of Wildland Fire. 6(1): 21-29. [26769]

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Fire Regimes

More info for the terms: density, fire cycle, fire frequency, fire occurrence, fire regime, fire severity, fire suppression, fire-return interval, frequency, litter, mean fire-return interval, mesic, natural, prescribed fire, restoration, severity, succession, tree

Bur oak is highly fire adapted, and frequent fires are necessary for bur oak persistence in most habitats. Although very frequent fires (<5-year intervals) typically eliminate bur oak recruitment into large size classes, patchy burn patterns or safe sites in burned areas could allow for limited recruitment and persistence even in very frequently burned sites. Loss of bur oak is much more likely through succession in unburned areas. Throughout bur oak's range, studies indicate that reduced fire frequencies often associated with European settlement have been detrimental to bur oak [104,137,182,183,236].

Fire characteristics in bur oak habitats: FIRE REGIMES in bur oak savannas are characterized by frequent, low-severity surface fires at intervals of less than 25 years. Crown fires and severe surface fires are extremely rare, occurring at intervals of over 1,000 years [75]. In a ponderosa pine forest with bur oak in South Dakota, fires were primarily surface fires. Stand-replacing fires burned only 3.3% of the total study area between 1529 and 1893 [37]. At the Konza Prairie, temperatures were monitored during a mid-April prescribed fire. In the tallgrass prairie, ground-level temperatures during the fire ranged from 66 to 750 °F (19-399 °C). In gallery forests where bur oak was most common, fire temperatures at ground level were lower, ranging from 66 to 365 °F (19-185 °C). Fire temperatures in the prairie were generally highest in areas that were unburned the longest [83].

At the Cedar Creek Natural History Area in Minnesota, researchers found that frequently burned plots had higher litter temperatures, lower litter moisture, and lower soil nitrogen and phosphorus availability than unburned plots. There were 0.3 to 0.8 spring prescribed fires/year in frequently burned plots. Fires were low severity and rarely resulted in complete consumption of the litter layer. Burned plots were dominated by grass, with scattered bur oak and northern pin oak. Unburned plots were closed-canopy oak forests dominated by northern pin oak [109].

Presettlement and contemporary Often in bur oak habitats, fire frequency decreased dramatically with settlement by European Americans. Cessation of burning by American Indians, conversion of land to agricultural use, livestock introductions, and active fire suppression are cited as the primary reasons for reduced fire frequencies and the subsequent loss of bur oak habitats [34,182,183,236,271].

Throughout the Midwest, many fire history studies document reduced fire frequency and severity in bur oak habitats. Fire frequency and fire severity reductions associated with European settlement have resulted in an extensive loss of area occupied by oak savannas, oak woodlands, and oak-pine woodlands. In the early 1900s, prairies and savannas occupied 27 to 32 million acres (11-13 million ha) of the Midwest, but in early 2000, just 0.02% of this area supported prairies and oak savannas. Presettlement and current FIRE REGIMES in the Midwest have changed dramatically from grasslands, savannas, and woodlands that experienced frequent and "intense" fires to agricultural lands or closed-canopy forests. As the "pyrogenic" communities remained unburned, the density of woody vegetation and shading increased and areas became increasingly mesic. This "mesophication" process produced communities that do not readily burn and makes restoration through the use of fire unlikely [182].

Burning by American Indians: Several studies suggest that burning by American Indians was important to the maintenance of prairies and oak savannas in the Midwest. American Indians were thought to have burned the prairie region nearly every year. In central North America, all but 1 of 247 prairie fires with known ignition sources was the result of human activity (Moore 1972 cited in [91]).

Studies in the Black Hills suggest that the Oglala Sioux used fire more frequently than the Cheyenne, Kiowa, and Crow tribes. Before 1770, the time between large fires in the Devil's Tower National Monument Area averaged 27 years. From 1770 to 1900, the average time between large fires was 14 years. Fire frequency increased near the time when the Oglala Sioux took over the area, which had been controlled by the Cheyenne, Kiowa, and Crow. The Oglala Sioux had come from prairie-forest border areas where they utilized fire to drive and kill animals. After 1900, the average time between large fires increased dramatically to 42 years. The last area-wide fire occurred in 1937, when the area was already settled by Europeans [69,70].

In an oak savanna remnant in Kenosha County, Wisconsin, 53% of fire scars represented dormant-season fires, which suggested a human ignition source because late summer is the season for lightning-caused fires in the area. Fire history was reconstructed from the cross sections of bur oak and white oak trees cut down to make way for an industrial park. Trees were 153 to 196 years old. During the presettlement period of 1829 to 1839, the mean fire-return interval was 3.7 years. During the peak of European American settlement, from 1840 to 1871, the mean fire-return interval increased to 19.5 years [271].

European settlement: The loss of bur oak habitats with European settlement, which typically coincided with reductions in fire frequency and/or fire severity, is well documented [34,182,183,236,271]. In some cases, activities associated with settlement, such as land clearing and railroad sparks, produced a short-lived increase in fire frequency.

In northwestern Minnesota and west-central Canada, bur oak is common in quaking aspen savannas, where the presettlement fire cycle was estimated at 2 to 15 years. Large, surface fires were most common. After settlement of the area, the fire cycle was estimated at 1,000 years. Fire suppression, logging, land clearing, roads, railroads, utility corridors, and urban areas all factored into the loss of fire in aspen savannas [104]. In the Konza Prairie, increases in forest-dominated areas and decreases in oak recruitment likely resulted from decreased fire frequency and/or severity. In 1858, only about 12 acres (5 ha) of the prairie was forest dominated; in 1939, forest-dominated area had increased to about 274 acres (111 ha); and in 1978, forest-dominated area had increased to 509 acres (206 ha) [3]. Reduced influence of fire was likely associated with European settlement of the area, which occurred in about 1840. Settlement activities that likely contributed to limiting fire occurrence and/or fire effects included construction, expansion of towns, farming, grazing by livestock, and fire suppression (review by [4]).

In a small 15.6-acre (6.3 ha) ponderosa pine forest, where bur oak occurred in the Black Hills of Lawrence County, South Dakota, the last fire occurred in 1879. Fire-scarred cross sections and increment cores indicated that fires were frequent between the mid-1600s and 1879. Mean fire-return intervals were estimated at 11 to 15 years but ranged from 1 to 43 years [265]. At Mount Rushmore, South Dakota, the fire history in a ponderosa pine forest revealed that the last fire occurred in 1893. From 1529 to 1893, the mean fire-return interval for the area was 16 years. The estimated low-severity, surface-fire rotation was 30 years and crown-fire rotation was 846 years [37].

In some cases, fire frequency increases in bur oak habitats were associated with European settlement. Although the overall fire frequency decreased with settlement of an oak savanna remnant in Kenosha County, Wisconsin, fire frequency increased in the mid-1920s with railroad development [271]. In the Brickyard Hill Conservation Area of northwestern Missouri, tree-ring records from bur oak, chinkapin oak, and black oak indicated that fire was rare after the mid-1950s but that a period of very frequent fire coincided with European settlement in the area. Tree cores established a record from 1671 to 2004. From 1672 to 1820, the time before European settlement of the area, the average fire-return interval was 6.6 years. Fires were very frequent from 1825 to 1850, which coincided with European settlement. Researchers found no relationships between fire and drought for any portion of the record. Most fire scars were made in the dormant season, September to March. Fire scars were much less frequent after 1900. Researchers suggested the reduced fire frequency may have been caused by domestic grazing, which would have decreased fuels and thus fire frequency [226].

See the Fire Regime Table for more information on fire regimes of vegetation communities in which bur oak may occur.

  • 4. Abrams, Marc D. 1986. Historical development of gallery forests in northeast Kansas. Vegetatio. 65: 29-37. [3255]
  • 34. Breining, Greg. 1993. The case of the missing ecosystem. Nature Conservancy. 43(6): 11-15. [22100]
  • 91. Grimm, Eric C. 1984. Fire and other factors controlling the Big Woods vegetation of Minnesota in the mid-nineteenth century. Ecological Monographs. 54(3): 291-311. [22170]
  • 183. Nuzzo, Victoria A. 1986. Extent and status of Midwest oak savanna: presettlement and 1985. Natural Areas Journal. 6(2): 6-36. [50415]
  • 236. Stout, A. B. 1944. The bur oak openings in southern Wisconsin. Transactions of the Wisconsin Academy of Science. 36: 141-161. [264]
  • 182. Nowacki, Gregory J.; Abrams, Marc D. 2008. The demise of fire and "mesophication" of forests in the eastern United States. BioScience. 58(2): 123-138. [70112]
  • 3. Abrams, Marc D. 1986. Ecological role of fire in gallery forests in eastern Kansas. In: Koonce, Andrea L., ed. Prescribed burning in the Midwest: state-of-the-art: Proceedings of a symposium; 1986 March 3-6; Stevens Point, WI. Stevens Point, WI: University of Wisconsin, College of Natural Resources, Fire Science Center: 73-80. [16271]
  • 37. Brown, Peter M.; Wienk, Cody L.; Symstad, Amy J. 2008. Fire and forest history at Mount Rushmore. Ecological Applications. 18(8): 1984-1999. [74211]
  • 69. Fisher, R. F.; Jenkins, M. J.; Fisher, W. F. 1985. Fire and the vegetative mosaic at Devils Tower National Monument. In: Long, James N., ed. Fire management: The challenge of protection and use symposium: Proceedings; 1985 April 17-19; Logan, UT. Logan, UT: Utah State University: 11-24. [6905]
  • 70. Fisher, R. F.; Jenkins, M. J.; Fisher, William F. 1986. Fire and the prairie-forest mosaic of Devils Tower National Monument. The American Midland Naturalist. 117(2): 250-257. [15638]
  • 75. Frelich, Lee E. 2002. The forest setting. In: Forest dynamics and disturbance regimes: Studies from temperate evergreen-deciduous forests. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press: 1-14. [43732]
  • 83. Gibson, David J.; Hartnett, David C.; Merrill, Gary L. S. 1990. Fire temperature heterogeneity in contrasting fire prone habitats: Kansas tallgrass prairie and Florida sandhill. Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club. 117(4): 348-356. [14138]
  • 109. Hernandez, Daniel L.; Hobbie, Sarah E. 2008. Effects of fire frequency on oak litter decomposition and nitrogen dynamics. Oecologia. 158(3): 535-543. [72978]
  • 137. Kipfmueller, Kurt F.; Hepola, Tim. 2007. Fire history and age structure analysis in the Sherburne National Wildlife Refuge: establishing reference conditions in a remnant oak savanna woodland. In: Butler, Bret W.; Cook, Wayne, comps. The fire environment--innovations, management, and policy; conference proceedings; 2007 March 26-30; Destin, FL. Proceedings RMRS-P-46CD. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station: 507-514. [71114]
  • 226. Stambaugh, Michael C.; Guyette, Richard P.; McMurry, Erin R.; Dey, Daniel C. 2006. Fire history at the eastern Great Plains margin, Missouri River Loess Hills. Great Plains Research. 16: 149-159. [82172]
  • 265. Wienk, Cody L.; Sieg, Carolyn Hull; McPherson, Guy R. 2004. Evaluating the role of cutting treatments, fire and soil seed banks in an experimental framework in ponderosa pine forests of the Black Hills, South Dakota. Forest Ecology and Management. 192(2-3): 375-393. [48628]
  • 271. Wolf, Joy. 2004. A 200-year fire history in a remnant oak savanna in southeastern Wisconsin. The American Midland Naturalist. 152(2): 201-213. [55434]
  • 104. Heinselman, Miron L. 1981. Fire intensity and frequency as factors in the distribution and structure of northern ecosystems. In: Mooney, H. A.; Bonnicksen, T. M.; Christensen, N. L.; Lotan, J. E.; Reiners, W. A., technical coordinators. FIRE REGIMES and ecosystem properties: Proceedings of the conference; 1978 December 11-15; Honolulu, HI. Gen. Tech. Rep. WO-26. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service: 7-57. [4390]

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Fuels

More info for the terms: fuel, litter, prescribed fire, presence, surface fire

Several characteristics of oak litter and woody debris make them flammable and important to fire spread. In a controlled experiment, dried bur oak leaves produced temperatures of up to 700 °F (371 °C) [231]. Oak leaves are thick, rigid, and irregularly shaped, which allows for efficient drying and persistence in the litter layer [182]. Leaves curl as they dry and produce a "loose, porous" fuel bed, which can easily carry fire (review by [153]). Oak leaves typically remain curled after snow melt, which allows for drying early in the spring. The high phenolic content of oak leaves means slow decomposition rates, ensuring fuel longevity [182]. Burning oak leaves can also be blown ahead of a fire, potentially igniting spot fires and increasing fire size (review by [153]). When compared, the oak fuel bed is much more "conducive to burning" than that of other hardwoods, which produce thin leaves that stick to the forest floor, trap moisture, provide few air-drying pockets, and decompose rapidly. Woody debris produced by oaks resists decay and provides a long-lasting fuel. Woody debris from other hardwoods decays much more rapidly than that of oak [182].

Prescribed fire in bur oak savanna near Vermont, Wisconsin; primary fuel for the surface fire was bur oak leaves.
Photo © Tom Brock, Universtiy of Wisconsin-Madison

Fuel characteristics in bur oak habitats may be affected by associated vegetation. In riparian areas in central Texas, eastern Oklahoma, southeastern Kansas, southern Missouri, and western Arkansas, bur oak occurred with riverbank grape (Vitis riparia). Often riverbank grape covered the lower branches of bur oak [173]. It is possible that the presence of riverbank grape as a ladder fuel could influence fire behavior and fire effects.

  • 182. Nowacki, Gregory J.; Abrams, Marc D. 2008. The demise of fire and "mesophication" of forests in the eastern United States. BioScience. 58(2): 123-138. [70112]
  • 153. Lorimer, Craig G. 1985. The role of fire in the perpetuation of oak forests. In:, Johnson, J. E., ed. Challenges in oak management and utilization. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin, Cooperative Extension Service: 8-25. [19543]
  • 173. Morano, L. D.; Walker, M. A. 1995. Soils and plant communities associated with three Vitis species. The American Midland Naturalist. 134(2): 254-263. [75534]
  • 231. Steffen, Jim. 1993. Study examines the heat of combustion of deciduous tree leaf litter. Restoration & Management Notes. 11(2): 152. [22788]

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Fuels and Fire Regimes

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Plant response to fire

More info for the terms: avoidance, basal area, density, fire frequency, fire-return interval, frequency, fuel, fuel moisture, litter, natural, prescribed fire, severity, top-kill, tree

Mature bur oak trees are rarely killed or even top-killed by one or more fires [5,30]. Mortality and top-kill by fire typically decrease with increasing tree age or size [122,190,192]. However, postfire sprouting typically decreases with tree age [219,221]. Bur oak seedling establishment on burned sites is variable and limited on repeatedly burned sites [3,5,30,139].

Fire case studies: Various aspects of bur oak survival and recruitment have been studied and reported in areas managed with prescribed fire. These studies provide additional, site-specific details on the effects of fire on bur oak trees, saplings, and seedlings.

In Meade County, South Dakota, fire effects were evaluated on 24 prairie and woodland plots burned by prescribed fires in April. Bur oak was the dominant tree in the plots; there were 1,097 bur oak trees/ha, and the basal area of bur oak was 39 m²/ha. In the understory, bur oak was rare. Fine fuel loads averaged 590 kg/ha; fine fuel moisture averaged 14.6%; woody fuel loads averaged 11 mt/ha; woody fuel moisture averaged 11%; and soil moisture averaged 38%. Fires spread at an average rate of 0.13 foot (0.04 m)/s. Fire spread was "poor" and several ignitions were often necessary [221]. Mortality of bur oak was rare in burned plots, but 2 fire-scarred bur oak trees with heart rot burned for up to 2 weeks. Just 1 large diameter bur oak tree was consumed by fire, and it produced 1 sprout. Bur oak sprouts were more abundant on burned than unburned plots. The number of bur oak sprouts/tree increased with increasing scorch heights but decreased with tree age. Sprouts were more abundant on bottomland sites than on floodplain or slope sites. Bur oak germination was not increased on burned sites, and seedling survival was similar on burned and unburned plots. Seedling survival between the 1st and 2nd postfire growing seasons was 58.5% on burned and 71.8% on unburned plots. The abundance and survival of bur oak sprouts and seedlings on burned and unburned sites are summarized in the table below [219,221].

Bur oak sprouts and seedlings on burned and unburned plots 1 and 2 growing seasons after a spring prescribed fire in Meade County, South Dakota [219,221]
Time since fire 1st postfire growing season 2nd postfire growing season
Burned 2.2 sprouts/tree 0.4 shrub-sized stems/m² 706 seedlings/ha 2.1 sprouts/tree 0.5 shrub-sized stems/m² 429 seedlings/ha
Unburned 0.5 sprouts/tree 0.4 shrub-sized stems/m² 1,071 seedlings/ha 0.5 sprouts/tree 0.4 shrub-sized stems/m² 692 seedlings/ha

Effects of spring prescribed fires were studied in oak savannas in east-central Minnesota's Cedar Creek Natural History Area [190,192]. Prescribed fires occurred in April or May, typically under the following weather conditions: air temperatures between 59 °F (15 °C) and 77 °F (25 °C), relative humidity from 25% to 45%, and wind speeds less than 12 miles (20 km)/hour. Prescribed fire frequencies for individual plots ranged from 0 to 26 fires in 32 years.

A study of 1st postfire growing season effects after a single, mid-May prescribed fire revealed that in general, the greater the sapling height at the time of the fire, the greater the number and height of postfire sprouts produced. This "low intensity" prescribed fire burned when the air temperature was 59 °F (15° C) and winds were less than 6.2 miles (10 km)/hour. Dry northern pin oak leaves were the primary surface fuel; flame lengths were 4 to 12 inches (10-30 cm). Before the fire, the site supported 800 bur oak saplings 10 to 26 feet (3-8 m) tall, with basal diameters of 1 to 3.5 inches (3-9 cm). The fire top-killed all but 2 saplings. For saplings greater than 3 feet (1 m) tall, the postfire sprouting frequency was 95% [192].

Bur oak seedlings and sprout densities were similar among plots with varied fire frequency in the Cedar Creek Natural History Area, but seedlings and sprouts were "suppressed" in frequently burned plots (11-26 fires in 32 years). Most sprouts grew from grubs. Generally, bur oak stems reached sapling height (5 feet (1.5 m)) in 3 years in the absence of fire. Dense thickets of bur oak saplings occurred in plots burned at low frequency (4 fires in 32 years). Mature bur oaks, even those in smaller size classes, were rarely killed by fire. When mortality occurred on burned sites it was typically from damage caused by the fall of another tree of a different species that was killed by fire. Mortality of bur oak trees on unburned sites was often the result of shading [190]. In the most frequently burned plots (26 fires in 32 years), the only tree species present were bur oak and northern pin oak [191]. The density and fate of bur oak saplings and trees on burned and unburned plots are summarized below.

Abundance of bur oak saplings and abundance and fate of bur oak trees on unburned and repeatedly burned plots in the Cedar Creek Natural History Area in east-central Minnesota [190]
  Unburned Low-frequency fire
(4 fires in 32 yrs)
High-frequency fire
(11 fires in 32 yrs)
Sapling* density (stems/ha) 89 215 2
Tree** basal area (m²/ha) 0.91 0.07 0.11
Tree density (stems/ha) 36 7 3
Tree mortality 17.5% 8.3% (all burned plots)
*Saplings: ≥1.5 m tall and <5 cm DBH.
**Trees: ≥5 cm DBH.

Earlier studies of the unburned and burned plots in the Cedar Creek Natural History Area described effects of prescribed fires that ranged from 11 to 17 fires in 17 years. Density of bur oak stems increased on unburned sites. Bur oak mortality averaged 29% across all plots, but recruitment exceeded mortality. Mortality of the oaks (bur oak and northern pin oak) averaged 75% for trees with diameters less than 4 inches (10 cm) and 30% for trees with diameters between 4 and 6.7 inches (10-17 cm). Oak mortality was least on plots burned 2 times in 17 years. Oak mortality was higher on plots burned 6 to 9 times in 17 years than on plots burned 11 times in 17 years. Researchers suggested that fires may have been more severe on the less frequently burned plots due to increases in woody stem densities with longer fire-free periods [122].

Fires every 3 to 5 years limited bur oak recruitment at Allison Savanna in east-central Minnesota, where prescribed fire is used to manage bur oak-northern pin oak barrens. The density of bur oak was 107 stems/ha on unburned plots and 53 stems/ha on high-frequency burned plots (25-year fire-return interval of 1.6-1.9 years). In unburned plots and low-frequency burned plots (25-year fire-return interval of 3.1-5 years), bur oak was abundant in the 4- to 9.8-inch (10-25 cm) DBH size classes. In unburned plots, bur oak trees ranged from 20 to more than 200 years old. In high-frequency burned plots, all bur oak stems were over 70 years old [67].

In the Namekagon River Barrens in northwestern Wisconsin, frequency of bur oak averaged 28% on burned and 16% on unburned sites. Burned sites experienced 1 or 2 spring fires, and postfire sampling occurred in the 1st or 2nd postfire growing season [258]. Bur oak density and basal area were greater on burned than unburned woodland plots in the Marengo Ridge Conservation Area of Illinois. Burned plots experienced 2 fall prescribed fires that were 4 years apart. Fires were low to moderate severity and burned when air temperatures were 60.1 °F (15.6 °C) and 47 °F (8.3 °C), relative humidities averaged 80% and 63%, and winds were 5 miles (8 km)/hour and 15 miles (24 km)/hour, respectively. Two years after the last fire, the density of bur oak (≥2-inch (5 cm) DBH) was 11 stems/ha on burned plots and 3 stems/ha on unburned plots. Basal area was 7.1 ft² (0.66 m²)/ha on burned and 2.9 ft² (0.27 m²)/ha on unburned plots [227].

Postfire seedling establishment: Fires may affect bur oak seedling establishment directly by removing litter and exposing mineral soil and indirectly by influencing the behavior of seed predators. However, the importance or inhibitory effects of litter and moisture on bur oak seedling establishment are unclear (see Seedling establishment). One researcher suggests that litter benefits establishment and survival of oak seedlings [153], while another researcher found that removal of litter improved oak seedling establishment in the field [141]. Because seed predators reduce the number of acorns available for establishment (see Seed predation), Lorimer [153] suggests that acorns on burned, open sites, which are not attractive feeding sites for many small mammals, may avoid predation better than those in unburned areas. However, such avoidance of predation could be counterproductive: The field study conducted by Krajicek [141] found that burial in mineral soil was most important to successful oak seedling establishment, and small mammal caches may be important for burial [74].

Because the combination of factors most conducive to bur oak seedling establishment is unclear, it is not surprising that fire studies fail to report clear patterns of postfire seedling establishment. It does appear however, that annual fires limit bur oak seedling establishment. In Madison County, large bur oak trees were frequent but there were no bur oak seedlings in a prairie remnant burned annually for at least the last 8 years [139]. In the Morton Arboretum in DuPage, Illinois, bur oak trees survived 17 years of annual, dormant-season, low-severity fires, but there was "little evidence for regeneration of oak species" [30]. See the Research Paper by Bowles and others 2007 for further information on prescribed fire and postfire responses of several plant species, including bur oak. On the Konza Prairie, bur oak seedlings were not present before burning in oak gallery forests, but in the 1st growing season after a late-April prescribed fire, the density of bur oak seedlings was 50/ha. The same bur oak seedling density was reported after another prescribed fire in early April of the following year. Prescribed fires moved slowly, 3 to 6.6 feet (1-2 m)/min, produced low flame heights (<1.6 feet (0.5 m)), and did not burn into tree crowns [3]. However, in a later study on the Konza Prairie, bur oak seedlings present before fires were absent 2 years after fire [5].

  • 67. Faber-Langendoen, Don; Davis, Mark A. 1995. Effects of fire frequency on tree canopy cover at Allison Savanna, eastcentral Minnesota, USA. Natural Areas Journal. 15(4): 319-328. [26527]
  • 190. Peterson, David W.; Reich, Peter B. 2001. Prescribed fire in oak savanna: fire frequency effects on stand structure and dynamics. Ecological Applications. 11(3): 914-927. [39627]
  • 192. Peterson, David Wassell. 1998. Fire effects on oak savanna and woodland vegetation in Minnesota. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota. 130 p. Dissertation. [82453]
  • 221. Sieg, Carolyn Hull; Wright, Henry A. 1996. The role of prescribed burning in regenerating Quercus macrocarpa and associated woody plants in stringer woodlands in the Black Hills, South Dakota. International Journal of Wildland Fire. 6(1): 21-29. [26769]
  • 3. Abrams, Marc D. 1986. Ecological role of fire in gallery forests in eastern Kansas. In: Koonce, Andrea L., ed. Prescribed burning in the Midwest: state-of-the-art: Proceedings of a symposium; 1986 March 3-6; Stevens Point, WI. Stevens Point, WI: University of Wisconsin, College of Natural Resources, Fire Science Center: 73-80. [16271]
  • 5. Abrams, Marc D. 1988. Effects of prescribed fire on woody vegetation in a gallery forest understory in northeastern Kansas. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science. 91(3-4): 63-70. [10796]
  • 30. Bowles, Marlin L.; Jacobs, Karel A.; Mengler, Jeffrey L. 2007. Long-term changes in an oak forest's woody understory and herb layer with repeated burning. Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society. 134(2): 223-237. [69792]
  • 74. Fox, J. F. 1982. Adaptation of gray squirrel behavior to autumn germination by white oak acorns. Evolution. 36(4): 800-809. [10518]
  • 122. Irving, F. D.; Aksamit, S. E. 1983. Tree mortality by fire in oak savanna restoration. Restoration & Management Notes. 1(4): 18-19. Abstract. [50360]
  • 139. Knoop, Jeffrey D. 1986. Floristic and vegetational survey of the W. Pearl King Prairie Grove, a prairie remnant in Madison County, Ohio. The prairie: past, present and future: Proceedings of the 9th North American prairie conference; 1984 July 29 - August 1; Moorhead, MN. Fargo, ND: Tri-College University Center for Environmental Studies : 44-49. [3513]
  • 141. Krajicek, John E. 1960. Some factors affecting oak and black walnut reproduction. Iowa State Journal of Science. 34(4): 631-634. [82449]
  • 153. Lorimer, Craig G. 1985. The role of fire in the perpetuation of oak forests. In:, Johnson, J. E., ed. Challenges in oak management and utilization. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin, Cooperative Extension Service: 8-25. [19543]
  • 191. Peterson, David W.; Reich, Peter B. 2008. Fire frequency and tree canopy structure influence plant species diversity in a forest-grassland ecotone. Plant Ecology. 194: 5-16. [70391]
  • 219. Sieg, Carolyn Hull. 1991. Ecology of bur oak woodlands in the foothills of the Black Hills, South Dakota. Lubbock, TX: Texas Tech University. 198 p. Dissertation. [82461]
  • 227. Stan, Amanda B.; Rigg, Lesley S.; Jones, Linda S. 2006. Dynamics of a managed oak woodland in northeastern Illinois. Natural Areas Journal. 26(2): 187-197. [63290]
  • 258. Vogl, Richard J. 1971. Fire and the northern Wisconsin pine barrens. In: Proceedings, annual Tall Timbers fire ecology conference; 1970 August 20-21; Fredericton, NB. No. 10. Tallahassee, FL: Tall Timbers Research Station: 175-209. [2432]

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Fire adaptations

More info for the terms: density, fuel, natural, prescribed fire, surface fire, top-kill, tree

Bur oak is well adapted to survive fire, and frequent fires are necessary for bur oak persistence in many habitats. Because the thick bark of mature bur oak trees insulates their cambium from high temperatures [8,239], mature trees rarely suffer any fire damage [5,30]. Young bur oak trees are typically only top-killed by fire [66,219,221]. Once bur oak trees reach 12 to 15 years old, they can survive repeated burning [53].

Thick bark: Many sources indicate that bur oak trees produce very thick, fire-resistant bark [55,76,121,222]. Large bur oak trees in eastern Nebraska produced bark about 1.5 inches (5 cm) thick [8]. In Funk's Grove in McLean County, Illinois, open-grown bur oak trees 111 to 140 years old, with DBH measurements of 37 to 68 inches (93-172 cm), had bark thicknesses of 1.6 to 2.4 inches (4-6 cm) [239].
Photo © Paul Wray, Iowa State University, Bugwood.org

In plantations and natural areas in Illinois, researchers evaluated the physical and protective characteristics of bur oak bark. Bark thickness increased with increasing DBH (r² = 0.93), and relatively high rates of bark thickening occurred with radial growth. Maximum bark thickness was 2.9 inches (7.4 cm) for a bur oak with a DBH of 52.9 inches (134.3 cm). Bark moisture was greatest in the summer and lowest in the fall, but differences were not statistically significant. Using a technique designed to mimic conditions produced by low-severity surface fire, researchers found that the average cambial temperature of bur oak during the fire was 134.8 °F (57.1 °C). Cambial temperature exceeded 140 °F (60 °C) for an average of 3.1 minutes in just one bur oak tree [106,107]. Exposure to temperatures of 140 °F (60 °C) for at least 60 s is typically required to kill vascular plant tissue, but tissue can survive 140 °F (60 °C) temperatures for a longer time when moisture content of the tissue is high [273].

Bark properties of 40-year-old bur oak in a plantation in midsummer and bur oak rank in relation to 10 other plantation species [106]
Property Average measurements for bur oak Ranking among other species*
Bark thickness 1.36 cm 2
Tree DBH 33.57 cm 4
Moisture content 84.96% 5
Specific gravity 0.47 g/cm³ 8
Thermal conductivity 2.30 7
Volatile matter 55.43% 11
Time to 300 °C ignition 27 s 5
Time to 600 °C ignition 8 s 6
*Other species: black cherry (Prunus serotina), black walnut (Juglas nigra), eastern cottonwood, shingle oak (Quercus imbricaria), silver maple, sugar maple, sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua), sycamore (Platanus occidentalis), white ash, white oak (Q. alba), and yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera).

Additional evidence of the protective power of bur oak bark came during the reconstruction of fire history in an oak savanna remnant in Kenosha County, Wisconsin. Researchers found scars on white oak recording fires that bur oak of similar ages did not record [271].

Sprouting potential: Young and small bur oak trees are often only top-killed by fire. Additional studies and details are needed, however, to determine what factors or combination of factors most influence bur oak sprouting potential and postfire sprout abundance: tree age, tree size, fire conditions, and/or site conditions. Young bur oak shoots or sprouts that are repeatedly top-killed by fire may develop large burl-like woody growth at the soil surface, which are commonly referred to as "grubs". During brief fire-free periods, grubs are released, and bur oak stem density can increase dramatically [53].

In brush-prairie vegetation in northwestern Minnesota, a 9-year-old bur oak was killed by fire, but a 13-year-old bur oak survived. At another site, the researcher found "severe" fire scars on bur oak trees that were 20 years old or slightly younger [66]. According to Curtis [53], bur oak shoots or sprouts that are protected from fire for 12 to 15 years typically survive subsequent fires. In Forest Glen County Preserve, Illinois, 27 bur oak trees that were 9.8 feet (3 m) tall or taller survived 2 sequential prescribed fires without top-kill. Five bur oak trees that were less than 3.3 feet (1 m) tall were top-killed and sprouted. Trees that were 6.6 to 9.8 feet (2-3 m) tall averaged 13 years old. Prescribed fires burned on 3 March 1992 and 30 March 1993. The 1st fire was "hot" and "intense" and burned moderate fuel loads in dry weather; the 2nd fire was less intense because of heavy spring rains and smaller fuel loads [120]. After a spring prescribed fire in Meade County, South Dakota, researchers found that the abundance of bur oak sprouts/tree increased with increasing scorch heights but decreased with tree age [219,221].

Bur oak stems may not sprout immediately after top-kill and may not sprout at all. After a mid-May prescribed fire in the Chippewa National Forest in Minnesota, researchers monitored sprouting for 5 years. Prior to burning the study site, there were 20 bur oak trees with DBH ranging from 3.9 to 16 inches (10-41 cm). Fuels were primarily quaking aspen slash, and the fire energy output rate was 5,800 cal/s-cm. Trees not killed by the fire were cut down. Sixty percent of the bur oak trees that were top-killed or cut down sprouted after the fire. Sprouts were most abundant in the 3rd postfire year. By the 5th postfire year, there was an average of 21 sprouts/clump, and sprouts averaged 8.2 feet (2.5 m) tall [189].

  • 66. Ewing, J. 1924. Plant successions of the brush-prairie in north-western Minnesota. Journal of Ecology. 12: 238-266. [11122]
  • 8. Aikman, John M. 1926. Distribution and structure of the forests of eastern Nebraska. Nebraska University Studies. 26(1-2): 1-75. [6575]
  • 53. Curtis, John T. 1959. Savanna. In: The vegetation of Wisconsin. Madison, WI: The University of Wisconsin Press: 325-351. [60528]
  • 55. Curtis, John T. 1959. Southern forests--xeric. In: The vegetation of Wisconsin. Madison, WI: The University of Wisconsin Press: 132-155. [60519]
  • 121. Hunter, Carl G. 1989. Trees, shrubs, and vines of Arkansas. Little Rock, AR: The Ozark Society Foundation. 207 p. [21266]
  • 222. Simpson, Benny J. 1988. A field guide to Texas trees. Austin, TX: Texas Monthly Press. 372 p. [11708]
  • 221. Sieg, Carolyn Hull; Wright, Henry A. 1996. The role of prescribed burning in regenerating Quercus macrocarpa and associated woody plants in stringer woodlands in the Black Hills, South Dakota. International Journal of Wildland Fire. 6(1): 21-29. [26769]
  • 5. Abrams, Marc D. 1988. Effects of prescribed fire on woody vegetation in a gallery forest understory in northeastern Kansas. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science. 91(3-4): 63-70. [10796]
  • 30. Bowles, Marlin L.; Jacobs, Karel A.; Mengler, Jeffrey L. 2007. Long-term changes in an oak forest's woody understory and herb layer with repeated burning. Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society. 134(2): 223-237. [69792]
  • 76. Frelich, Lee E.; Faber-Langendoen, Don; Tester, John; Tilman, David. 1992. Changes in age structure of oak woodlands along a topographic and disturbance gradient. Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America. 73(2)Suppl: 180. Abstract. [82153]
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  • 219. Sieg, Carolyn Hull. 1991. Ecology of bur oak woodlands in the foothills of the Black Hills, South Dakota. Lubbock, TX: Texas Tech University. 198 p. Dissertation. [82461]
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Successional Status

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More info for the terms: climax, cover, density, fire exclusion, fire frequency, forb, frequency, fuel, mesic, natural, restoration, severity, shrub, shrubs, succession, top-kill, tree, xeric

In most areas, bur oak is a shade-intolerant, early-seral species that is replaced by shade-tolerant deciduous species in the absence of large-scale disturbances. Individual bur oak trees typically survive disturbance and repeated top-kill. Large canopy gaps are likely necessary for establishment from seed following disturbance, but colonization by seedlings will likely be slow (>30 years).

Shade tolerance: Although bur oak is typically shade intolerant, it can tolerate some shade, in some habitats, at least in the short-term. Patterns of establishment, suppression, and release in mixed-deciduous, old-growth forests in northern Ohio were evaluated from tree core data. Researchers concluded that bur oak was intolerant of shade and became a part of the canopy only where it had established following a large-scale, canopy-removing disturbance [45]. However, other studies report bur oak on shaded sites. Although not abundant in ground layer vegetation in red pine (Pinus resinosa) stands in Minnesota's Chippewa National Forest, bur oak was most frequent in plots receiving a little less than 20% of full sun [217]. Surveys of the Ozark Plateau in eastern Missouri and Arkansas conducted in 1815 showed that bur oak did not occur in open woodlands, savannas, or scrubby oak vegetation, but did occur in dense, closed-canopy forests at low frequency [177]. In North Dakota, bur oak seedlings and saplings were reported in floodplain forests along the Missouri River. Bur oak importance generally increased as scouring and flooding ceased and floodplain forest stand age increased [126,128].

Seral stage: Bur oak stands have been described as early-, mid-, and late-seral as well as subclimax and postclimax, but categorizing bur oak stands into climatic seral stage communities may only be appropriate for areas with harsh site conditions. In the Great Lakes region, bur oak communities are described as peristent vegetation maintained by frequent fire [91].

In the Dakotas, bur oak communities have been classified as early-, mid-, and late-seral and also as subclimax and postclimax. Along the Missouri River in South Dakota, late-seral bur oak woodlands were rare because excessive livestock grazing and/or plant disease made most woodlands early- or mid-seral communities. Cover of grasses decreased from early- to late-seral stages, and bur oak canopy, forb, and shrub cover increased from early- to late-seral communities [207]. In the Black Hills of South Dakota, researchers considered bur oak-sumac communities to be subclimax. A bur oak-deciduous forest, which appeared to be returning to a shrubby subclimax stage was described as "postclimax" [101]. Judd [131] also described a bur oak community in the badlands of western North Dakota as "postclimax".

A review of survey records, other historical records, and edaphic and topographic features of the Big Woods of south-central Minnesota indicated that firebreaks were the primary factor in controlling vegetation patterns. Bur oak represented a persistent vegetation type maintained by fire [91].

Succession in the absence of fire:
Prairies: It is common for bur oak to establish throughout a prairie if the time between fires extends to 10 years or more. Bur oak may also establish as scattered individuals in safe sites during shorter fire-free periods. Bur oak functions as a "pioneer along the prairie border" [65]. In the prairie-deciduous forest ecotone that occurs from Minnesota to Texas, bur oak and other woody species invade the prairie at an average rate of 1 foot (0.3 m)/year without frequent fire [16]. In Kansas, bur oak increased its range during a time of decreased fire frequency in prairie habitats [80]. In the Wolf Road Prairie in Cook County, Illinois, researchers compared the composition and structure of vegetation over time. Before 1955, the area supported a bur oak savanna. In the next 10 years, a period without fire, the density of bur oak stems increased dramatically. Bur oak grubs, which are burl-like woody structures that develop on the soil surface as young bur oak stems or sprouts are repeatedly top-killed by fire, were released during the fire-free period and produced an abundance of stems. By 1995, the area was dominated by a dense 30-year-old subcanopy of bur oak and northern pin oak. Gaps in the subcanopy were rare [31].

Oak savannas and woodlands: Once bur oak reaches the stage at which it can tolerate repeated fire (12 years or older), it persists indefinitely in savannas or open woodlands with frequent fire [53]. Without fire, bur oak savannas and woodlands are replaced by other deciduous species that are intolerant of fire but tolerant of shade. Changes in bur oak savannas in Wisconsin in the absence of fire were well described by Curtis [53]. After about 10 years without fire in prairies and bur oak savannas, woody saplings and other shrubs become established. After 25 to 30 years without fire, dense oak forests develop. Large, mature bur oaks in the savannas can survive overtopping by other species for about 80 years, at which point they become weakened by wood-rot fungi in the shade-killed lower branches. Most bur oak trees in dense woodlands are snapped by wind storms after 100 to 110 years. Survey records from 1837 to 1840 in Lake County, Illinois, indicated that bur oak was the most common tree species, and bur oak savannas were the most common vegetation type. Surveys in the late 1940s and 1950s showed that, with the exclusion of prairie fires, bur oak savannas were heavily invaded by other woody vegetation. As of 1978, the bur oak savannas of presettlement time in this area were extinct [172]. A comparison of survey records for Stewart's Woods in Wisconsin showed that the area changed from a bur oak-dominated savanna in 1834 to a dense woodland where bur oak was only a minor species in 1946. After evaluating the histories of land use, climate, and diseases, researchers concluded that European settlement and the end of frequent burning by American Indians facilitated the successional change [48]. For a summary of studies documenting changes from open oak savannas and oak-pine woodlands in early land surveys to dense, closed-canopy, mesophytic forest types in more contemporary surveys, see Nowacki and Abrams [182].

The succession from bur oak savanna or woodland to dense, mesic stands has been described in many areas. In his study of vegetation and successional change in Wisconsin, Curtis [55] reported that bur oak fails to reproduce successfully once canopy cover reaches 75%. Climax species that often replace bur oak include sugar maple (Acer saccharum), basswood, and hackberry. The bur oak-chinkapin oak community type that occurs along the Mississippi River drainage system from Kansas and Nebraska to Wisconsin is replaced by sugar maple and basswood in absence of fire or other major disturbances [170]. In southern and western Wisconsin, researchers described a vegetational continuum in upland forest stands. Drought-tolerant, shade-intolerant species such as bur oak, bigtooth aspen (Populus grandidentata), and black oak were first to invade prairie vegetation. Climax species included eastern hophornbeam and sugar maple [52]. In the absence of major disturbances over a 50-year period in the David-Purdue Research Forest in east-central Indiana, bur oak importance decreased and density of American elm and sugar maple increased [187]. After European settlement in about 1840 around the Konza Prairie in northeastern Kansas, the extent, frequency, and/or severity of fires in the area decreased. In the gallery forests, there are old, large bur oaks and chinkapin oaks, but there has been very little oak recruitment for over 50 years. Hackberry dominates the young size classes on moist sites and eastern redbud (Cercis canadensis) on dry sites [4].

Other factors affecting succession: While the forest succession described above may be most common, different successional patterns and drivers are also possible. On calcareous soils at Lake Itasca in Minnesota, bur oak is a mid-seral species. Early-seral forests are dominated by quaking aspen, birch (Betula spp.), and jack pine (Pinus banksiana). In the mid-seral, hardwood-eastern white pine (P. strobus) forest, bur oak is common before sugar maple becomes dominant. Climax forest species include white spruce (Picea glauca) and balsam fir (Abies balsamea) [150]. In central Kentucky, dendrochronological analyses indicated that an oak savanna, where bur oak was common, developed from a closed-canopy forest. Historical growth rates and growing conditions estimated from dendrochronologies suggested that savanna trees exhibited suppressed growth rates early in life and were part of a closed-canopy forest. Closed-canopy forests may have developed because American Indian populations in the area suffered extensive losses from pandemics, particularly small pox. Rapid tree growth coincided with Euro-American settlement, which involved extensive land clearing to create pastures [165]. In xeric savannas invaded by nonnative common buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica) in southeastern Wisconsin, bur oak reproduction is generally lacking. Invasion by common buckthorn coincided with European settlement and fire exclusion. Conditions from 6.6 feet (2 m) above ground to ground level were shadier in invaded than in uninvaded areas [151], which likely limited bur oak recruitment.

On some harsh sites, bur oak may be a late-seral species or may persist for longer periods in the absence of disturbance because successional change occurs slowly on these sites. In Riding Mountain National Park, Manitoba, bur oak forest stands are replacing themselves on excessively drained, gravelly, sandy soils. Researchers doubted that many other tree species could tolerate the dry site conditions [42]. In the Upper Midwest, bur oak often dominates dry calcareous savanna, where soils are shallow or excessively drained. A lack of herbaceous fuel build up on the harsh sites limits the chance of intense fires. Although the density and cover of woody vegetation have increased without fire, harsh soil conditions allow for the persistence of remnant savannas [266]. In the absence of large disturbances in Wisconsin, bur oak typically dominates for just a single generation before being replaced by more shade-tolerant species, but bur oak dominates longer without disturbances on hot, dry sites, where soil organic matter and water retention increase slowly [55]. In south-central Wisconsin, bur oak persisted in the absence of disturbance only in open stands on the most xeric sites [188]. Bur oak may respond to stress from abundant moisture in central Illinois. On mesic sites, bur oak is a pioneer species and is replaced by sugar maple as shade levels increase, but in wet-mesic and floodplain forests, bur oak generally replaces itself and persists through succession [6].

In some areas, researchers think that climate has more influence than fire on succession in bur oak communities. Researchers suggested that climate rather than American Indian fires were responsible for development of oak savannas in southern Ontario, where bur oak occurred but was not dominant [240]. After reviewing current site conditions, historical climate evidence, time since last fires, and European settlement records, researchers suggested that the prevailing climate in Minnesota from 1812 to 1825 was conducive to forest invasion of the prairies and savannas. Although lack of fire was considered important to the succession from prairie or pine-oak savanna to sugar maple-basswood forests, researchers concluded that climate was the most influential factor [39].

Old field succession: Bur oak establishment is slow in old fields, even if an adjacent seed source exists. The following studies suggest that bur oak is unlikely in old fields abandoned less than 30 years. Bur oak did not occur in fields abandoned for 19 to 24 years in southeastern Ontario, even though bur oak occurred in forests adjacent to the fields [51]. In southwestern Ohio, bur oak was uncommon in a 90-year-old field but was not reported in 2-, 10-, 50-year-old fields [255]. On the Anoka Sand Plain in east-central Minnesota, bur oak did not occur in a hayfield abandoned for about 20 years. The area was dominated by bur oak savannas before conversion to agriculture, but the abundance of bur oak in the woodlands surrounding the field was not reported [61]. In the Cedar Creek Natural History Area on the Minnesota sandplain, bur oak was generally absent from fields less than 15 years old [246]; bur oak seedlings and saplings were scattered near the woodland margin of a 48-year-old field; and bur oak seedlings were common but saplings were rare in 60-year-old fields [247]. In east-central Minnesota, researchers surveyed the forest-field margins of 18 fields abandoned less than 65 years. Bur oak was extremely rare in fields less than 31 years old. Abundance in fields increased with increasing abundance of bur oak trees in adjacent forests [149]. In an old field adjacent to mixed-hardwood-oak forests in Ottertail County, Minnesota, bur oak established within 30 years of abandonment [102].

Disturbance-related succession: Large canopy gaps appear necessary for bur oak colonization. Single-tree canopy gaps did not encourage bur oak recruitment in the Brownfield Woods in Champaign County, Illinois. Between 1925 and 1975, the open oak woodland dominated by bur oak and chinkapin oak was being replaced by a closed-canopy woodland dominated by sugar maple. In areas where slippery elm (Ulmus rubra) was killed by disease, sugar maple colonized [169]. During a study of the structure, composition, and environmental relationships of an old-growth remnant in northwestern Ohio, researchers found bur oak trees with DBH greater than 3 feet (1 m) but none with DBH less than 15.8 inches (40 cm). Historical disturbance patterns suggested that bur oak established after 1 or more large disturbances that were more extensive than single- or multiple-tree falls. Occurrence of bur oak was a function of disturbance and not simple edaphic relationships [27]. Bur oak recruitment occurred in canopy gaps created by a "catastrophic windthrow" event in northern pin oak but not in eastern white pine forests in Minnesota. Density of bur oak (>1 inch (2.5 cm) DBH) was 64 stems/ha before and 92 stems/ha 14 years after the storm [12].

Browsing: Livestock and native ungulates can limit bur oak survival and recruitment. Several studies suggest that browsing can maintain open conditions in oak savannas and woodlands. Bur oak seedlings and saplings are commonly browsed by livestock and deer. On a coal mine restoration site in Kansas, bur oak stems within the reach of cattle were nearly browsed to the ground each year [213]. In the Little Missouri National Grasslands, bur oak survival 5 years after planting was 44% in areas grazed by cattle and 82% in protected areas [253]. In ponderosa pine-bur oak forests in the Black Hills of Wyoming and South Dakota, livestock exclusion is suggested to encourage bur oak regeneration [216]. See IMPORTANCE TO LIVESTOCK AND WILDLIFE for more on the utilization and palatability of bur oak.

Researchers suggest that loss of large carnivores, introduction of livestock, and browsing by native ungulates limited recruitment of bur oak in Wind Cave National Park, South Dakota. Tree core analyses showed that bur oak recruitment peaked in the 1870s but was nearly nonexistent after the 1890s. Loss of recruitment coincided with large carnivore removal and rapid increases in livestock abundance. When the Park Service removed livestock, however, bur oak recruitment did not improve, likely because of continued heavy browsing by unchecked native ungulate populations. Bur oak trees with a DBH of less than 20 inches (51 cm) were restricted to areas with physical barriers restricting large mammal access [200]. In an upland 230-year-old red pine forest in Itasca State Park, Minnesota, protection from deer browsing allowed for some recruitment of bur oak into the larger size classes. Researchers reported that moderate to high deer browsing levels slowed woody encroachment and succession [204,233].

Density (stems/ha) of bur oak stems by size class inside and outside exclosures in a red pine forest in Minnesota [204,233]
Size class (height, unless otherwise reported) 0.15-2.1 m 2.1-4.3 m >4.3 m overstory
(≥20 cm DBH)
  in* out in out in out in out
1969 17 0 5 0 0 0 0 0
1984 15 20 15 0 5 0 0 0
*Exclosures constructed in 1937.

Many studies suggest that grazing can maintain open conditions in bur oak habitats in the absence of fire. In the Sheguiandah Township on Manitoulin Island in Ontario, bur oak savannas have remained open because of almost continuous livestock grazing. According to early surveys, these savannas resulted from a "catastrophic fire" in 1865. None of the savannas had burned since 1865, and in areas protected from grazing, a closed woodland has developed [130]. A similar situation was reported in another study in Ontario [199] and the Barton Woods of north-central Illinois. An open-canopy bur oak woodland changed to a closed-canopy forest with an abundance of other deciduous species after 50 to 60 years without grazing. On continually grazed sites, canopy trees, primarily bur oak, were often 39 to 79 feet (12-24 m) apart and sometimes 164 feet (50 m) apart [163]. In the TL Davis Preserve in southwestern Douglas County, Nebraska, just 2 bur oak trees established before 1895 and nearly all other bur oak and other woody species established after 1968. Reasons for the 70- to 80-year gap in tree establishment were not known, but grazing was suspected because of the fencing remnants observed. In 1850, the bur oak-dominated cover was estimated at 23%, and by 2003, it was 99% [92].

Although many suggest that grazing may inhibit bur oak establishment, others suggest the opposite may be true. In western Iowa, periodic overgrazing of prairies during settlement of the area was suggested as the main reason for "spectacular forest advances" [164].

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Vegetative regeneration

More info for the terms: frequency, tree

Vegetative regeneration: Bur oak's ability to sprout following aboveground damage is well established, but factors that influence the frequency and abundance of sprouts are not well described. Bur oak sprouting potential appears to decrease with increasing tree age [219,221]. Sprouting of pole-size or smaller bur oak stems is considered "vigorous" after cutting or burning according to Johnson [125]. After an ice storm in a mixed forest near Ottawa, Ontario, just 12% of damaged bur oak trees produced any sprouts, but 1 damaged stem produced 39 sprouts [36]. Vegetative regeneration is also discussed in the Fire Effects and Management section related to Postfire sprouting.

Shading affected sprouting of bur oak seedlings in a common garden in southern Illinois. One-year-old seedlings cut to ground level sprouted and grew more than uncut seedlings after a year in the common garden. In 95% shade, cut seedlings failed to sprout [13].

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  • 221. Sieg, Carolyn Hull; Wright, Henry A. 1996. The role of prescribed burning in regenerating Quercus macrocarpa and associated woody plants in stringer woodlands in the Black Hills, South Dakota. International Journal of Wildland Fire. 6(1): 21-29. [26769]
  • 13. Ashby, W. Clark. 1976. Basswood seedlings outgrow red and bur oak in full light or heavy shade. Tree Planters' Notes. 27(4): 24-26. [22183]
  • 36. Brommit, Angela G.; Charbonneau, Neil; Contreras, Thomas A.; Fahrig, Lenore. 2004. Crown loss and subsequent branch sprouting of forest trees in response to a major ice storm. Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society. 131(2): 169-176. [82135]
  • 219. Sieg, Carolyn Hull. 1991. Ecology of bur oak woodlands in the foothills of the Black Hills, South Dakota. Lubbock, TX: Texas Tech University. 198 p. Dissertation. [82461]

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Seedling establishment and plant growth

More info for the terms: density, fire exclusion, litter, mesic, natural, shrub, succession, tree, xeric

Bur oak seedlings establish on a variety of sites. Burial in mineral soil improves establishment, but the importance of litter, moisture, and shading in bur oak seedling establishment is less clear. There is no clear pattern to establishment by region or site conditions. It could be that bur oak seedlings exploit harsh sites, where the successful recruitment of other species is limited.

Bur oak seedlings rapidly develop taproots. Researchers monitored the development of shoots and taproots from bur oak acorns collected from northeastern Kansas in the greenhouse. Germinated acorns were planted in soil collected from an annually burned prairie site. The soil was 20% sand, 47% silt, and 33% clay and had a pH of 7.4. About 20 days after germination, bur oak taproots were 5.6 to 11.4 inches (14.4-29.0 cm) long, but shoots had yet to emerge. After 104 days, taproot growth averaged 13 mm/day, and shoot growth averaged 3 mm/day. Researchers thought that rapid taproot growth allowed bur oak to tolerate the temperature and moisture fluctuations characteristic of prairie habitats [56].

Site conditions and inheritance may affect bur oak seedling establishment and plant growth. Bur oak acorns from Menard County, Texas, are said to produce the most drought-tolerant bur oaks in Texas [222].

Acorn burial: Burial of acorns in mineral soil was most important to successful oak seedling establishment in a field experiment in a moderately dense, even-aged oak stand on the Amana Experimental Forest in Iowa. Removal of litter was the second most important factor in successful oak establishment. Researchers planted bur oak, black oak, white oak, and northern red oak in protected and unprotected plots with and without litter. Oak establishment was greatest in plots where litter was removed, acorns were protected from rodents, and acorns were buried beneath 1 inch (2.5 cm) of soil. Protected and unprotected plots without litter had 85% more seedlings than plots with litter and rodent protection [141]. However, in a review of fire and oak relationships, Lorimer [153] suggests that litter can benefit oak seedling establishment.

Caching by small mammals may facilitate seedling establishment through acorn burial. In forest preserves near Chicago, Illinois, researchers observed gray squirrels handling white oak and bur oak acorns. Of 152 acorns handled, 138 were buried. In some cases, however, the growing points of the seed were removed prior to caching [74].

Moisture conditions: Some studies suggest that bur oak establishment is best during drought conditions or on dry, open sites, while other studies indicate that establishment is best on mesic sites. In old fields in Quebec, bur oak seedling growth was evaluated along a soil moisture gradient. Growth was better at wet and dry extremes than at intermediate soil moisture levels [46].

Bur oak establishment coincided with drought conditions in Minnesota, and bur oak recruitment was best in open, xeric habitats in Manitoba. Bur oak recruitment into the Big Woods of central Minnesota peaked during drought conditions prevailing in the 1930s [218]. Analysis of bur oak tree cores from the Helen Allison Savanna, east-central Minnesota, showed that bur oak establishment aligned closely with periods of extended drought. Dry conditions may have limited herbaceous productivity and created openings for establishment. Fire history of the area was not determined, and the researchers acknowledge that fire likely also affected population dynamics [275]. Bur oak recruitment decreased with increasing moisture and shading in Riding Mountain National Park in Manitoba. The driest and most open bur oak-low shrub community type supported the greatest density of bur oak seedlings and saplings. Seedling and sapling densities were least in the most mesic, closed-canopy oak-aspen-ash community [272].

Studies and observations in Illinois suggest that bur oak establishment and survival were best on mesic sites. In the Trelease Woods in Champaign County, bur oak seedling and sapling densities were greatest on wet soils. Only a small number seedlings and saplings occurred on drier soils [81]. In central Illinois, bur oak seedlings were absent from dry and dry-mesic sites but on mesic, wet-mesic, and wet sites there were 56.3, 33.3, and 8.3 bur oak seedlings/ha, respectively [6].

While bur oak seedlings establish well on mesic sites, saturated or flooded conditions are less suitable for establishment. In field and greenhouse studies, bur oak seedlings were taller and had greater biomass in well-drained than saturated soils; however, differences by soil types were much more pronounced in the greenhouse than in the field [59]. In a greenhouse study where 3-month-old bur oak seedlings were flooded for 30 days, root growth was reduced. Flooded seedlings were less drought tolerant when flooding receded [242].

Shade conditions: Bur oak seedlings establish beneath woodland canopies, but studies suggest that bur oak seedling growth may be best in less dense shade.

Recruitment was reported in several shaded habitats in the western part of bur oak's range. Along the Missouri River in central North Dakota, bur oak reproduced beneath an eastern cottonwood-peachleaf willow (Populus deltoides-Salix amygdaloides) canopy. As succession proceeded in the absence of scouring and flooding, bur oak replaced the eastern cottonwood-peachleaf willow community [126]. In another study along the Missouri River, bur oak seedlings and saplings were sparse in floodplain forests, but seedlings and saplings were abundant on lower terraces near the floodplain edge where soils were mesic and fertile [128]. Along the gallery forest-tallgrass prairie ecotone at the Konza Prairie Research Natural Area in northeastern Kansas, bur oak seedlings were much more restricted to shaded microsites than chinkapin oak seedlings were [32].

Bur oak seedling growth was much greater in full sun than deep shade in a common garden experiment in southern Illinois. Researchers reported the height increase between the 1st and 2nd years of growth. In full sun, bur oak seedlings grew 39 inches (100 cm). In 95% shade, bur oak seedlings grew 5 inches (13 cm). One-year-old seedlings cut to ground level were 15.8 inches (129 cm) tall at the end of the 2nd year in full sun. Cut seedlings failed to sprout in 95% shade [13].

Bur oak seedlings established in prairie and oak habitats after acorns were planted in a cleared area of prairie, in an intact oak stand, and in an intact basswood stand near the Missouri River in southeastern Nebraska. After 2 years, the diameters of bur oak seedlings in cleared prairie were 10 times those of seedlings in the oak stand. Seedling heights in the prairie were 7 times those of seedlings in the oak stand. Bur oak seedlings in the basswood stand died by the end of the 2nd growing season. All sites had fine silt loam soils. Soil temperatures were greatest in the prairie and least in the basswood stand. During the growing season, the prairie site experienced full sun, the oak stand averaged 10.4% full sun, and the basswood stand averaged 3.4% full sun. The growth and fate of bur oak seedlings in the 3 sites are summarized in the table below [117]:

Root growth of 1-, 2-, and 3-year-old bur oak seedlings in 3 different sites in southeastern Nebraska [117]
Site Prairie Oak woodland Basswood woodland
1-year-old seedlings
Root length (inches) 60 20 11
Root spread (inches) 30 11 3
2-year-old seedlings
Root length (feet) 8.5 2.3 *
Root spread (feet) 5.2 0.8 *
3-year-old seedlings
Root length (feet) 10 ~2.3 *
Root spread (feet) 7.2 ~1.0 *
* Seedlings died.

Shading and established vegetation did not substantially affect bur oak seedling establishment or first-year growth in the Konza Prairie in northeastern Kansas. Total aboveground biomass/seedling was not significantly different among 3 experimental treatments: 1) undisturbed plant community (control), 2) removal of all aboveground biomass, and 3) removal of all aboveground biomass plus shading. Bur oak seedling survival was high (about 89%) in shaded and control plots and just a little lower (81%) in biomass removal plots. During this study, growing-season precipitation was 35% of the long-term average [57].

Browsing: Bur oak seedling survival is improved when seedlings are protected from browsing. In the Little Missouri National Grasslands, bur oak seedling survival was 90% on sites protected from browsing for 3 years. On unprotected sites, survival was 69% [25]. Browsing by livestock and deer was reported as one reason for a lack of bur oak recruitment in south-central Minnesota. In 4 studied stands, bur oak was the most important of all trees in the large size class (≥9.8 inch (25 cm) DBH) but was never most important in the smaller size class (<9.8 inch (25 cm) DBH). Recruitment between 1910 and 1970 was low to non-existent. Past land-use histories suggested that browsing, fire exclusion, and increased abundance of nonnative and mesic species had reduced recruitment. In stands where fire was reintroduced and livestock were excluded, abundance of bur oak trees less than 40 years old increased [138]. For more on this topic as it relates to more long-term vegetation changes, see Browsing as it relates to succession.

Mature bur oak tree growth: Once bur oaks are established, their growth rate typically increases [108]. Site conditions can dramatically affect bur oak growth. On a "poor" site, bur oak may only have a 4-inch (10 cm) diameter at 100 years old, but on deep rich soils, the diameter of the same-aged tree may be 30 inches (76 cm) [55]. In the Niobrara Valley in Nebraska, similar-aged bur oak trees are 15 to 20 feet (1.5-6 m) tall with a DBH of 2 to 7 inches (5-18 cm) on moisture-limited sites, and are 40 to 50 feet (12-15 m) tall with a DBH of 21 to 34 inches (53-86 cm) on sites with abundant ground water [249]. On a moderately moist site in Kansas, bur oak trees grew 0.7 inch (1.8 cm)/year during a wet period and 0.4 inch (1.1 cm)/year during a dry period [9].

  • 6. Adams, Dwight E.; Anderson, Roger C. 1980. Species response to a moisture gradient in central Illinois forests. American Journal of Botany. 67(3): 381-392. [13295]
  • 9. Albertson, F. W.; Weaver, J. E. 1945. Injury and death or recovery of trees in prairie climate. Ecological Monographs. 15: 393-433. [4328]
  • 55. Curtis, John T. 1959. Southern forests--xeric. In: The vegetation of Wisconsin. Madison, WI: The University of Wisconsin Press: 132-155. [60519]
  • 222. Simpson, Benny J. 1988. A field guide to Texas trees. Austin, TX: Texas Monthly Press. 372 p. [11708]
  • 59. Deitz, Karen B. 1997. Seed germination and seedling growth of woody plant species under saturated and well-drained conditions in the field and greenhouse. Syracuse, NY: State University of New York, College of Environmental Science and Forestry. 84 p. Thesis. [82455]
  • 13. Ashby, W. Clark. 1976. Basswood seedlings outgrow red and bur oak in full light or heavy shade. Tree Planters' Notes. 27(4): 24-26. [22183]
  • 25. Bjugstad, Ardell J.; Girard, Michele. 1984. Wooded draws in rangelands of the northern Great Plains. In: Henderson, F. R., ed. Guidelines for increasing wildlife on farms and ranches: With ideas for supplemental income sources for rural families. Manhattan, KS: Kansas State University, Cooperative Extension Service; Great Plains Agricultural Council, Wildlife Resources Committee: 27B-36B. [4239]
  • 32. Bragg, Wendy K.; Knapp, Alan K.; Briggs, John M. 1993. Comparative water relations of seedling and adult Quercus species during gallery forest expansion in tallgrass prairie. Forest Ecology and Management. 56: 29-41. [20946]
  • 46. Cogiastro, Alain; Gagnon, Daniel; Bouchard, Andre. 1997. Experimental determination of soil characterisitics optimal for the growth of ten hardwoods planted on abandoned farmland. Forest Ecology and Management. 96: 49-63. [27430]
  • 56. Danner, Brett T.; Knapp, Alan K. 2001. Growth dynamics of oak seedlings (Quercus macrocarpa Michx. and Quercus muhlenbergii Engelm.) from gallery forests: implications for forest expansion into grasslands. Trees. 15(5): 271-277. [39418]
  • 57. Danner, Brett T.; Knapp, Alan K. 2003. Abiotic constraints on the establishment of Quercus seedlings in grassland. Global Change Biology. 9: 266-275. [82139]
  • 74. Fox, J. F. 1982. Adaptation of gray squirrel behavior to autumn germination by white oak acorns. Evolution. 36(4): 800-809. [10518]
  • 81. Geis, James W.; Boggess, William R. 1970. Soil-vegetation relationships in a prairie grove remnant. Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club. 97(4): 196-203. [82155]
  • 108. Herman, Dale E. 1993. Quercus macrocarpa, bur oak. Arbor Age. 13(7): 48-49. [21657]
  • 117. Holch, A. E. 1931. Development of roots and shoots of certain deciduous tree seedlings in different sites. Ecology. 12(2): 259-298. [3734]
  • 126. Johnson, W. Carter. 1992. Dams and riparian forests: case study from the upper Missouri River. Rivers. 3(4): 229-242. [49559]
  • 128. Johnson, W. Carter; Burgess, Robert L.; Keammerer, Warren R. 1976. Forest overstory vegetation and environment on the Missouri River floodplain in North Dakota. Ecological Monographs. 46(1): 59-84. [6313]
  • 138. Kittelson, Pamela M.; Pinahs, Christopher; Dwyer, Joshua; Ingersoll, Angela; Mans, Elaine; Rieke, Jennifer; Rutman, Brady; Volenec, Matthew. 2009. Age structure and genetic diversity of four Quercus macrocarpa (Michx.) populations in fragmented oak savanna along the central Minnesota River Valley. The American Midland Naturalist. 161(2): 301-312. [74295]
  • 141. Krajicek, John E. 1960. Some factors affecting oak and black walnut reproduction. Iowa State Journal of Science. 34(4): 631-634. [82449]
  • 153. Lorimer, Craig G. 1985. The role of fire in the perpetuation of oak forests. In:, Johnson, J. E., ed. Challenges in oak management and utilization. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin, Cooperative Extension Service: 8-25. [19543]
  • 218. Shuman, Bryan; Henderson, Anna K.; Plank, Colin; Stefanova, Ivanka; Ziegler, Susy S. 2009. Woodland-to-forest transition during prolonged drought in Minnesota after ca. AD 1300. Ecology. 90(10): 2792-2807. [81308]
  • 242. Tang, Z. C.; Kozlowski, T. T. 1982. Some physiological and morphological responses of Quercus macrocarpa seedlings to flooding. Canadian Journal of Forest Research. 12: 196-202. [42024]
  • 249. Tolstead, W. L. 1942. Vegetation of the northern part of Cherry County, Nebraska. Ecological Monographs. 12: 255-292. [4470]
  • 272. Wolfe, Kim. 2001. Bur oak (Quercus macrocarp Michx.) in Riding Mountain National Park. Winnipeg, MB: University of Manitoba. 162 p. Thesis. [82463]
  • 275. Ziegler, Susy Svatek; Larson, Evan R.; Rauchfuss, Julia; Elliott, Grant P. 2008. Tree establishment during dry spells at an oak savanna in Minnesota. Tree-Ring Research. 64(1): 47-54. [82174]

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Germination

More info for the term: fresh

Conditions considered best for bur oak germination were not well documented in the available literature. In general, germination appears to decrease with desiccation and likely acorn age, but in its northern range, bur oak acorn germination requires 60 days or more of cold stratification ([248], review by [28]).

In controlled conditions, germination of bur oak acorns can be as high as 80%. After 25 to 45 days of alternating temperatures of 86 °F and 68 °F (30/20 °C) in the laboratory, bur oak germination averaged 45% (review [28]). Studies at a greenhouse container nursery showed that bur oak acorns germinated slowly and incompletely. Germination decreased as acorns dried. When acorns were 100%, 80%, and 65% of their fresh weight, germination was about 80%, 35%, and 0%, respectively. Bur oak acorns collected from North Dakota required 90 to 120 days of stratification before germinating. High temperatures were required for continued shoot growth [248].

A Forest Service nursery handbook reports that bur oak acorns have no dormancy and recommends planting acorns immediately follow harvest [268]. In Nebraska, 30% of bur oak seeds germinated within 1 month of falling (review by [125]).

  • 125. Johnson, Paul S. 1990. Quercus macrocarpa Michx. bur oak. In: Burns, Russell M.; Honkala, Barbara H., technical coordinators. Silvics of North America. Volume 2. Hardwoods. Agric. Handb. 654. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service: 686-692. [82254]
  • 28. Bonner, Franklin T. 2008. Quercus L.: oak. In: Bonner, Franklin T., Karrfalt, Robert P., eds. Woody plant seed manual. Agric. Handbook No. 727. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service: 928-938. [62581]
  • 248. Tinus, Richard W. 1978. Production of container-grown hardwoods. Tree Planters' Notes. 29(4): 3-9. [63157]
  • 268. Williams, Robert D.; Hanks, Sidney H. 1976. Hardwood nurseryman's guide. Agric. Handb. 473. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. 78 p. [4182]

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Seed dispersal

More info for the term: tree

Bur oak acorns are animal dispersed. Small mammals are the most likely dispersers. Birds are less likely dispersers, given the large size of bur oak acorns. Likelihood of bird dispersal may increase if only bur oak acorns are available or if small acorns are produced in a given season or on a given site. One study reported that bur oak acorns were dispersed by blue jays in Iowa (Johnson unpublished data [124]), but in a later Iowa study, blue jays avoided bur oak acorns [127].

Animal-mediated dispersal distances as great as 490 feet (150 m) were reported in forest fragments in southern Ontario. Rodents were the suspected dispersal agent. In this study, researchers searched a maximum distance of 490 feet (150 m) between seedlings and the nearest fruiting tree, suggesting that acorn dispersal distances may have been even greater than reported [110]. Near Manhattan, Kansas, fox squirrels cached bur oak acorns an average of 59 feet (18 m) from the source pile [228], but when researchers evaluated the number of seedlings occurring beyond the woodland edge in the same area, bur oak seedlings were found a maximum of 169 feet (51.5 m) from the forest edge [229].

  • 228. Stapanian, Martin A.; Smith, Christopher C. 1984. Density-dependent survival of scatterhoarded nuts: an experimental approach. Ecology. 65(5): 1387-1396. [10380]
  • 110. Hewitt, Nina; Kellman, Martin. 2002. Tree seed dispersal among forest fragments: II. Dispersal abilities and biogeographical controls. Journal of Biogeography. 29(3): 351-363. [82159]
  • 124. Johnson, Carter W.; Webb, Thompson, III. 1989. The role of blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata L.) in the postglacial dispersal of fagaceous trees in eastern North America. Journal of Biogeography. 16: 561-571. [27818]
  • 127. Johnson, W. Carter. 1997. Nut caching by blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata L.): implications for tree demography. The American Midland Naturalist. 138(2): 357-370. [27816]
  • 229. Stapanian, Martin A.; Smith, Christopher C. 1986. How fox squirrels influence the invasion of prairies by nut-bearing trees. Journal of Mammalogy. 67(2): 326-332. [11978]

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Seed production

More info for the term: frequency

Detailed research specific to bur oak acorn production over time and space is generally lacking. Bur oak is a masting species, producing large acorn crops in most but not all years. Age at first reproduction for bur oak is reported as 35 years in a review [93]. Bur oak may still produce seeds at 400 years old, but the optimum seed bearing years are reported as 75 to 150 (review by [125]). Observations in eastern Nebraska showed that bur oak produced an "abundance" of large acorns [8]. In 3 years of observations near Harvard, Illinois, bur oak trees produced "large" acorn crops in 2 years and almost no acorns in the other year [62]. Weather is one factor that may affect bur oak acorn production. After an early April frost that followed very warm March temperatures in the Trelease Woods of Illinois, bur oak trees with flower buds at the time of the frost failed to produce seed [15].

Bur oak trees sometimes produced multiple-seeded acorns. In east-central Illinois, acorns were collected from 17 bur oak trees. Only 8 trees produced exclusively single-seeded acorns; the frequency of double-seeded acorns was 20% [78]. At the Iowa State University Horticulture Research Station, 7 of 18 bur oak trees produced acorns containing more than 1 seed. A few acorns contained as many as 5 seeds [21].

Seed predation: Bur oak acorns are a food source for a variety of birds and mammals [35,125,202], and high levels of predation are common in bur oak habitats. In a floodplain forest in the Flint Hills of Kansas, squirrels removed 72% of bur oak acorns within 24 hours of burial beneath 1 to 2 cm of soil. After 4 days, 97.4% of bur oak acorns were removed. Researchers supposed fox squirrels were the most common seed predator [171]. When 400 bur oak acorns were artificially cached in 3 sites southwest of Chicago, 279 to 397 were removed within a week [74]. When artificial bur oak acorn caches were revisited a year after burial in a south-central Iowa woodland-prairie, none of the cache sites had bur oak seedlings. Tests conducted prior to the caching experiment indicated that 65% of seeds were germinable. Researchers suggested high detection and seed predation rates caused emergence failure [127]. In a tallgrass prairie field study, only 11% of planted acorns escaped predation although protective screens were in place [57].

Insects are also a source of seed predation or loss of seed viability. The frequency of insect infestations was 43% to 100% for acorns collected from bur oak trees in east-central Illinois. The researchers indicated that insect infestations reduced bur oak seed germination but did not report the amount of this reduction [78].

  • 8. Aikman, John M. 1926. Distribution and structure of the forests of eastern Nebraska. Nebraska University Studies. 26(1-2): 1-75. [6575]
  • 35. Briggs, John M.; Smith, Kimberly G. 1989. Influence of habitat on acorn selection by Peromyscus leucopus. Journal of Mammalogy. 70(1): 35-43. [10387]
  • 93. Guyette, Richard P.; Muzika, Rose-Marie; Kabrick, John; Stambaugh, Michael C. 2004. A perspective on Quercus life history characteristics and forest disturbance. In: Spetich, Martin A., ed. Upland oak ecology symposium: history, current conditions, and sustainability: Proceedings; 2002 October 7-10;Fayetteville, AR. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-73. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station: 138-142. [82156]
  • 125. Johnson, Paul S. 1990. Quercus macrocarpa Michx. bur oak. In: Burns, Russell M.; Honkala, Barbara H., technical coordinators. Silvics of North America. Volume 2. Hardwoods. Agric. Handb. 654. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service: 686-692. [82254]
  • 202. Rogers, Lynn L. 1987. Effects of food supply and kinship on social behavior, movements, and population growth of black bears in northeastern Minnesota. Wildlife Monographs No. 97. Washington, DC: The Wildlife Society. 72 p. [68405]
  • 15. Augspurger, Carol K. 2009. Spring 2007 warmth and frost: phenology, damage, and refoliation in a temperate deciduous forest. Functional Ecology. 23(6): 1031-1039. [81314]
  • 21. Beck, Allan R.; Weigle, Jack L. 1970. Plural-seeded acorns in bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa Michx.). HortScience. 5(1): 10-11. [3282]
  • 57. Danner, Brett T.; Knapp, Alan K. 2003. Abiotic constraints on the establishment of Quercus seedlings in grassland. Global Change Biology. 9: 266-275. [82139]
  • 62. Dow, B. D.; Ashley, M. V. 1998. High levels of gene flow in bur oak revealed by paternity analysis using microsatellites. The Journal of Heredity. 89(1): 62-70. [82140]
  • 74. Fox, J. F. 1982. Adaptation of gray squirrel behavior to autumn germination by white oak acorns. Evolution. 36(4): 800-809. [10518]
  • 78. Garrison, W. J.; Augspurger, C. K. 1983. Double- and single-seeded acorns of bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa): frequency and some ecological consequences. Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club. 110(2): 154-160. [82154]
  • 127. Johnson, W. Carter. 1997. Nut caching by blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata L.): implications for tree demography. The American Midland Naturalist. 138(2): 357-370. [27816]
  • 171. Monzyk, Frederick R.; Smith, Christopher C. 1991. Fox squirrel rate of seed removal in comparison to that of nocturnal animals. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science. 94(1-2): 30-32. [82167]

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Pollination and breeding system

More info for the terms: cohort, density, dichogamous, monoecious, tree

Bur oak is monoecious [90] and dichogamous. Pollen is released before female flowers are receptive, and self pollination is rare, if it occurs at all [62]. Weather conditions may affect bur oak pollination and flowering success. In central Pennsylvania, researchers studied flowering and fruiting in species within the white oak group, including bur oak. Prolonged wet and rainy weather delayed pollen shed, and dry winds and killing freezes reduced or eliminated male flowers and pollen dispersal [215].

Genetic variation: Most studies show high levels of diversity in bur oak populations. In northern Illinois, researchers characterized pollen dispersal using microsatellite analysis. A little more than half of all acorns were pollinated by trees from outside of the study stand. Researchers suggested that bur oak was highly efficient in producing highly outbred individuals [62]. An analysis of 21 bur oak populations from the Great Lakes, Midwest, and Great Plains showed high levels of genetic variation. Genetic similarity of populations tended to decrease with increasing geographic distances between populations, however. Researchers suggested high levels of variation were likely a result of bur oak's wide geographic range, wind-facilitated outcrossed pollination, and long life span, most of which characterize species with high genetic variability [208]. Researchers also found high genetic variation in 14 bur oak stands in central Illinois that were 0.8 to 157 miles (1.3-252.8 km) apart. Researchers predicted that long-distance pollen dispersal would protect bur oak from reproductive isolation in fragmented habitats [49].

Another study suggests that gene flow may have decreased in the last 100 years for bur oak stands in south-central Minnesota. For stands that were 3.1 to 18.6 miles (5-30 km) apart, researchers found that younger populations were more genetically differentiated than older cohorts. Because the younger cohort differs genetically from the older cohort, researchers suspected that the younger cohorts have accumulated different allelic frequencies through reduced gene flow between populations. Fragmentation of stands and an increased density of associated tree species may have restricted gene flow [138].

  • 90. Great Plains Flora Association. 1986. Flora of the Great Plains. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas. 1392 p. [1603]
  • 208. Schnabel, Andrew; Hamrick, J. L. 1990. Comparative analysis of population genetic structure in Quercus macrocarpa and Q. gambelii (Fagaceae). Systematic Botany. 15(2): 240-251. [11727]
  • 49. Craft, Kathleen J.; Ashley, Mary V. 2007. Landscape genetic structure of bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa) savannas in Illinois. Forest Ecology and Management. 239(1-3): 13-20. [65503]
  • 62. Dow, B. D.; Ashley, M. V. 1998. High levels of gene flow in bur oak revealed by paternity analysis using microsatellites. The Journal of Heredity. 89(1): 62-70. [82140]
  • 138. Kittelson, Pamela M.; Pinahs, Christopher; Dwyer, Joshua; Ingersoll, Angela; Mans, Elaine; Rieke, Jennifer; Rutman, Brady; Volenec, Matthew. 2009. Age structure and genetic diversity of four Quercus macrocarpa (Michx.) populations in fragmented oak savanna along the central Minnesota River Valley. The American Midland Naturalist. 161(2): 301-312. [74295]
  • 215. Sharp, Ward M.; Chisman, Henry H. 1961. Flowering and fruiting in the white oaks. I. Staminate flowering through pollen dispersal. Ecology. 42: 365-372. [3910]

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Regeneration Processes

More info for the terms: breeding system, top-kill

Bur oak reproduces by seed and is capable of vegetative regeneration from sprouts following top-kill. These topics are discussed in detail below in Seedling establishment and Vegetative regeneration.

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Growth Form (according to Raunkiær Life-form classification)

More info on this topic.

More info for the term: phanerophyte

Raunkiaer [195] life form:
Phanerophyte
  • 195. Raunkiaer, C. 1934. The life forms of plants and statistical plant geography. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 632 p. [2843]

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Life Form

More info for the terms: shrub, tree

Tree
Tree-shrub

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Fire Regime Table

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Seed banking

Acorns produced by the white oak group have little to no dormancy and typically germinate soon after falling. White oak acorns do not tolerate dessication below 25% to 30% moisture (review by [28]). A Forest Service nursery handbook reports that bur oak acorns do not store well and may survive only 1 winter in storage [268].
  • 28. Bonner, Franklin T. 2008. Quercus L.: oak. In: Bonner, Franklin T., Karrfalt, Robert P., eds. Woody plant seed manual. Agric. Handbook No. 727. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service: 928-938. [62581]
  • 268. Williams, Robert D.; Hanks, Sidney H. 1976. Hardwood nurseryman's guide. Agric. Handb. 473. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. 78 p. [4182]

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Reaction to Competition

Bur oak is classed as  intermediate in tolerance to shade (5). Some consider it more  tolerant than northern red and white oaks; but on the prairie  margins, bur oak stands are often invaded by black oak, white  oak, and bitternut hickory. Bur oak reproduction in old white  pine-bur oak stands in Minnesota reaches only sapling size before  dying from suppression, and these stands are being replaced by  maple-basswood communities.

    In the wet bottom lands of northern Ohio, bur oak is a secondary  species in the cover type Black Ash-American Elm-Red Maple,  together with shellbark hickory, green ash, white ash (Fraxinus  americana), pin oak, and swamp white oak. On the better  drained bottom lands, bur oak may be successfully replaced by  more tolerant species such as sugar maple (Acer saccharum),  American basswood, and American beech (Fagus  grandifolia).

    On the prairie edges, bur oak is a pioneer tree, commonly  succeeded by northern pin oak (Quercus ellipsoidalis), black  oak, white oak, and bitternut hickory. The climax trees on these  sites are sugar maple and basswood or sugar maple and beech. Bur  oak may be a climax tree with hickory on extremely dry southern  aspects and on thin, stony soils. In general, it is a species  well adapted to sites ranging from droughty to moderately wet.  But, on any given site, it is largely restricted to plant  communities in early successional stages (17).

  • Burns, Russell M., and Barbara H. Honkala, technical coordinators. 1990. Silvics of North America: 1. Conifers; 2. Hardwoods.   Agriculture Handbook 654 (Supersedes Agriculture Handbook 271,Silvics of Forest Trees of the United States, 1965).   U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Washington, DC. vol.2, 877 pp.   http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/silvics_manual/table_of_contents.htm External link.
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Rooting Habit

In the sapling stage, taproot development  continues to be rapid, with abundant lateral growth as well. The  taproots of 8-year-old saplings in upland clay soils of Missouri  were more than 4.3 in (14 ft) long, and primary laterals extended  up to 3.4 in (11 ft) (5). In prairie areas, roots of bur oak and  hackberry have been found at depths of 3 to 6 in (10 to 20 ft);  and a 43-year-old bur oak tree had a lateral spread of 12.5 in  (41 ft) although the tree was only 6 in (20 ft) tall. A study of  a tree 36 cm (14 in) in d.b.h. revealed that the weight of the  roots equaled that of the tops, and root volume was only about 10  percent less than top volume.

  • Burns, Russell M., and Barbara H. Honkala, technical coordinators. 1990. Silvics of North America: 1. Conifers; 2. Hardwoods.   Agriculture Handbook 654 (Supersedes Agriculture Handbook 271,Silvics of Forest Trees of the United States, 1965).   U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Washington, DC. vol.2, 877 pp.   http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/silvics_manual/table_of_contents.htm External link.
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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Phenology

More info on this topic.

Throughout its range, bur oak flowers sometime between April and early June [7,55,63,90,237,270]. Acorns are produced in the same year as the flowers [55]. Acorns fall as early as August and as late as November ([7], review by [125]).
  • 55. Curtis, John T. 1959. Southern forests--xeric. In: The vegetation of Wisconsin. Madison, WI: The University of Wisconsin Press: 132-155. [60519]
  • 63. Duncan, Wilbur H.; Duncan, Marion B. 1988. Trees of the southeastern United States. Athens, GA: The University of Georgia Press. 322 p. [12764]
  • 90. Great Plains Flora Association. 1986. Flora of the Great Plains. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas. 1392 p. [1603]
  • 125. Johnson, Paul S. 1990. Quercus macrocarpa Michx. bur oak. In: Burns, Russell M.; Honkala, Barbara H., technical coordinators. Silvics of North America. Volume 2. Hardwoods. Agric. Handb. 654. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service: 686-692. [82254]
  • 237. Strausbaugh, P. D.; Core, Earl L. 1977. Flora of West Virginia. 2nd ed. Morgantown, WV: Seneca Books. 1079 p. [23213]
  • 270. Wofford, B. Eugene. 1989. Guide to the vascular plants of the Blue Ridge. Athens, GA: The University of Georgia Press. 384 p. [12908]
  • 7. Ahlgren, C. E. 1957. Phenological observations of nineteen native tree species in northeastern Minnesota. Ecology. 38(4): 622-628. [74]

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Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering in spring.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

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Reproduction

Vegetative Reproduction

Vigorous sprout growth follows  the burning or cutting of pole-size or smaller bur oaks; but  except for seedling sprouts, the quality and form of sprout stems  are poor. Some sprout growth is also produced by larger trees,  but the effect of size and age of parent tree on sprouting vigor  and quality has not been determined (5). Five years after  prescribed burning in Minnesota, 60 percent of bur oaks 10 to 41   cm (4 to 16 in) d.b.h. had produced sprouts. Sprouts occurred in  clumps averaging 21 live stems and the three tallest live stems  per clump averaged 2.5 m (8.2 ft) tall (18).

  • Burns, Russell M., and Barbara H. Honkala, technical coordinators. 1990. Silvics of North America: 1. Conifers; 2. Hardwoods.   Agriculture Handbook 654 (Supersedes Agriculture Handbook 271,Silvics of Forest Trees of the United States, 1965).   U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Washington, DC. vol.2, 877 pp.   http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/silvics_manual/table_of_contents.htm External link.
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Seedling Development

Various conditions influence  seedling development (5). In Iowa uplands, germination of acorns  and early development of bur oak were best where litter had been  removed. Germination is hypogeal (16). When covered by litter,  acorns were most susceptible to pilferage by rodents, and the  newly developed seedlings were more liable to fungus and insect  attack. In a Nebraska study, about 30 percent of acorns  germinated within 1 month after seedfall, and the new seedlings  were less susceptible to freezing than those of white oak. Under  controlled environment, bur oak seedlings grew fastest at a  daytime temperature of 310 C (880 F) and a nighttime temperature  of 19° C (66° F) (23). The relatively high daytime  temperature and a high (70 percent) relative humidity were  necessary to obtain more than one flush of shoot growth during  the first growing season. When grown under continuous light, bur  oak also produced a greater number of shoot flushes than under  normal light (19).

    As a bottom-land species, bur oak is relatively intolerant of  flooding, and a mesic, fertile environment is required for  seedling establishment (11,14). In open bottom lands,  reproduction of bur oak may be prolific, but first-year mortality  may be 40 to 50 percent when seedling submersion is 2 weeks or  longer during the growing season. For shorter periods of  growing-season submersion, seedling mortality is only about 10 to  20 percent. Although bur oak seedlings can endure flooding for up  to 30 consecutive days during the growing season, root growth is  greatly reduced, thus reducing drought tolerance after flood  waters have receded (22).

    Bur oak seedlings have also been found to be efficient users of  water, based on studies of the ratio of transpiration resistance  to C02 uptake resistance (25). In this characteristic, it was  slightly exceeded by black oak but was more efficient than  northern red oak, white oak, and sugar maple for leaf  temperatures up to 35° C (95° F). The large number and  area of stomata per unit leaf area in bur oak are associated with  potentially high transpiration rates (4).

    Root growth of juvenile bur oaks is rapid, and the taproot  penetrates deeply into the soil before the leaves unfold. At the  end of the first growing season, bur oak roots have been found at  depths of 1.37 m (4.5 ft), with a total lateral spread of 76 cm  (30 in). This strong early root development, along with high  water-use efficiency, may explain why bur oak can pioneer on  droughty sites and can successfully establish itself in  competition with prairie shrubs and grasses (5).

  • Burns, Russell M., and Barbara H. Honkala, technical coordinators. 1990. Silvics of North America: 1. Conifers; 2. Hardwoods.   Agriculture Handbook 654 (Supersedes Agriculture Handbook 271,Silvics of Forest Trees of the United States, 1965).   U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Washington, DC. vol.2, 877 pp.   http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/silvics_manual/table_of_contents.htm External link.
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Seed Production and Dissemination

The acorns ripen within  the year and drop from the tree as early as August or as late as  November. Germination usually occurs soon after seedfall, but  acorns of some northern trees may remain dormant through winter  and germinate the following spring (5).

    Bur oaks bear seed up to an age of 400 years, older than reported  for any other American oak. The minimum seed-bearing age is about  35 years, and the optimum is 75 to 150 years (5,16). Good seed  crops occur every 2 to 3 years, with no crops or light crops in  intervening years. The acorns are disseminated by gravity, by  squirrels, and to a limited extent by water.

  • Burns, Russell M., and Barbara H. Honkala, technical coordinators. 1990. Silvics of North America: 1. Conifers; 2. Hardwoods.   Agriculture Handbook 654 (Supersedes Agriculture Handbook 271,Silvics of Forest Trees of the United States, 1965).   U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Washington, DC. vol.2, 877 pp.   http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/silvics_manual/table_of_contents.htm External link.
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Flowering and Fruiting

Bur oak is monoecious; male and  female flowers in separate catkins are home on the current year's  branchlets. It flowers shortly after the leaves appear, from  about the first of April in the southern part of its range to  about mid-June in the north (5). Pollen from one tree appears to  germinate better on the stigmas of another, favoring cross  pollination.

  • Burns, Russell M., and Barbara H. Honkala, technical coordinators. 1990. Silvics of North America: 1. Conifers; 2. Hardwoods.   Agriculture Handbook 654 (Supersedes Agriculture Handbook 271,Silvics of Forest Trees of the United States, 1965).   U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Washington, DC. vol.2, 877 pp.   http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/silvics_manual/table_of_contents.htm External link.
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Growth

Growth and Yield

Bur oak is a slow-growing tree (5). In  12- to 16-year-old plantations on Iowa upland sites, average  annual height growth ranged from 0.09 to 0.52 m (0.3 to 1.7 ft)  and diameter growth from less than 2.5 to 6.4 mm (0.1 to 0.25  in). In the shelterbelts of the northern Great Plains, an annual  height growth of about 0.3 m (1 ft) was reported for trees kept  under clean cultivation.

    In Iowa, 10-year d.b.h. growth of bur oak averaged 3.0 cm (1.2 in)  for 10- to 20-cm (4- to 8-in) trees, 3.6 cm (1.4 in) for 25- to  36-cm (10- to 14-in) trees, 4.6 cm (1.8 in) for 41- to 51-cm (16-  to 20-in) trees, and 5.6 cm (2.2 in) for trees 56 cm (22 in) and  larger. More rapid growth has been reported in Kansas where trees  35 to 40 years old averaged 2.5 cm (I in) growth in d.b.h. in 3.8  years. Approximately the same growth rate has been observed in  the northern Mississippi Delta region.

    Bur oak is said to have reached a height of 52 m (170 ft) and a  d.b.h. of 213 cm (84 in) in the lower Ohio Valley. On the better  sites, mature trees generally grow 24 to 30 in (80 to 100 ft)  tall, 91 to 122 cm (36 to 48 in) in d.b.h., and live 200 to 300  years. Characteristically, they have a massive, clear trunk and a  broad, open crown of stout branches.

    In the oak openings of southern Wisconsin and in the prairie  border areas to the south and west, bur oak often is found in  nearly pure stands (3,5). The trees are widely spaced,  short-boled, and often uniform in size. Trees in a 50- to  65-year-old stand in eastern Nebraska were 9 to 12 in (30 to 40  ft) tall and spaced at intervals of 3 to 12 in (10 to 40 ft). Bur  oak grows 21 in (70 ft) tall on the fertile soils in this region,  but on dry, limestone ridges, the trees may be less than 7.6 in  (25 ft) tall at 150 years of age. In Minnesota, bur oak is short  lived on the poorer sites.

    Timber volumes in the bur oak type of Iowa were estimated to be  15.4 m³/ha (1,100 fbm/acre), three-fourths of which were bur  oak.

  • Burns, Russell M., and Barbara H. Honkala, technical coordinators. 1990. Silvics of North America: 1. Conifers; 2. Hardwoods.   Agriculture Handbook 654 (Supersedes Agriculture Handbook 271,Silvics of Forest Trees of the United States, 1965).   U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Washington, DC. vol.2, 877 pp.   http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/silvics_manual/table_of_contents.htm External link.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Genetics

Population Differences    A northern form of bur oak, Quercus macrocarpa var. olivaeformis,  has been recognized (5). Acorns of this form often germinate  in the spring following seedfall rather than soon after falling,  and germination is improved by stratification. Acorn size is  about half that of the southern form, and the cup is much thinner  and smaller. Cleaned seeds average 595/kg (270/lb) compared to  only 165/kg (75/lb) for the typical species (16). Where the two  forms are found in the same locality, as in eastern Nebraska, the  typical bur oak is more common on the moister sites (5,13).  Varietal crosses occur in such areas. Photoperiodic ecotypes of  bur oak have also been recognized. In one study, shoot growth of  a more northerly seed source was about two-thirds of that of a  more southerly seed source under short days; under long days,  shoot growth of both sources was nearly equal (24).

    Hybrids    Bur oak has been known to hybridize with nine species as follows:  white oak, Q. x bebbiana Schneid.; swamp white oak, Q.  x schuettei Trel.; Gambel oak (Q. gambellii);  overcup oak, Q. x megaleia Laughlin; swamp chestnut  oak, Q. x byarsii Sudw.; chinkapin oak (Q.  muehlenbergii), Q. x deamii Trel.; English oak (Q.  robur); post oak, Q. x guadalupensis Sarg.; and live  oak (Q. uirginiana). The cross with white oak, Q. x  bebbiana, Bebb oak, is one of the most frequent of the white  oak hybrids and is widespread within the overlapping ranges of  the two species (9). The hybrid formed with Gambel oak, a western  species, is somewhat unusual in that the two species do not now  have overlapping ranges (15).

  • Burns, Russell M., and Barbara H. Honkala, technical coordinators. 1990. Silvics of North America: 1. Conifers; 2. Hardwoods.   Agriculture Handbook 654 (Supersedes Agriculture Handbook 271,Silvics of Forest Trees of the United States, 1965).   U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Washington, DC. vol.2, 877 pp.   http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/silvics_manual/table_of_contents.htm External link.
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Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Quercus macrocarpa

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Quercus macrocarpa

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 7
Specimens with Barcodes: 8
Species With Barcodes: 1
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LR/lc
Lower Risk/least concern

Red List Criteria

Version
2.3

Year Assessed
1998
  • Needs updating

Assessor/s
Sternberg, G.

Reviewer/s

Contributor/s
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Information on state- and province-level protection status of plants in the United States and Canada is available at NatureServe. At the eastern and southern fringes of its range, bur oak has been described as endangered [156], of special concern [160], and critically imperiled [154].
  • 156. Magee, Dennis W.; Ahles, Harry E. 2007. Flora of the Northeast: A manual of the vascular flora of New England and adjacent New York. 2nd ed. Amherst, MA: University of Massachusetts Press. 1214 p. [74293]
  • 154. Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, Natural Heritage Program. 1999. Rare plant species of Louisiana--December 1999. Baton Rouge, LA: Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries. 20 p. [35364]
  • 160. Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, Department of Fish and Game. 2008. Fact sheet: Bur oak--Quercus macrocarpa A. Michaus, [Online]. In: Massachusetts list of endangered, threatened and special concern species. Boston, MA: Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program (Producer). Available: http://www.mass.gov/dfwele/dfw/nhesp/species_info/nhfacts/quercus_macrocarpa.pdf [2011, May 27]. [82727]

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Status

Please consult the PLANTS Web site and your State Department of Natural Resources for this plant’s current status, such as state noxious status and wetland indicator values.

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USDA NRCS National Plant Data Center & the Biota of North America Program

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Management

Management considerations

More info for the term: fire exclusion

At the edges of its range, bur oak may be a conservation concern [20,167,209].
Bur oak is also a food source of lepidopterans, of which one species is threatened [179,210].
Given bur oak's fragile existence in some areas as well as its importance to the persistence of other threatened species, its response to predicted climate change is considered important.

Conservation concerns: Bur oak is a
conservation concern in Canada [20,167], and several bur oak communities in the Plains region are considered "imperiled" [209]. This topic has also been discussed in Local distribution changes.
The following Great Plains communities are rare and/or vulnerable to extinction [209]:



  • bur oak/big bluestem-switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) woodland

  • bur oak/big bluestem-porcupine grass (Stipa spartea) woodland

  • bur oak-northern pin oak/little bluestem-prairie Junegrass (Schizachyrium
    scoparium-Koeleria macrantha) woodland

  • chinkapin oak-bur oak/big bluestem ravine woodland

  • quaking aspen-bur oak-willow (Salix spp.)/big bluestem shrubland

  • bur oak-swamp white oak river terrace woodland

  • bur oak/chokecherry northern ravine woodland

  • bur oak/American hazelnut (Corylus americana) woodland

  • bur oak/eastern hophornbeam forest

  • bur oak-basswood/eastern hophornbeam/western snowberry forest

  • bur oak-swamp white oak-shellbark hickory/cutgrass-woodreed (Carya
    laciniosa/Leersia spp.-Cinna spp.) floodplain forest

  • pin oak-swamp white oak-bur oak-red maple (Acer rubrum) sand flatwoods forest
Bur oak savannas are important for lepidopteran communities. On Iowa's Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge, smaller forests lacking a prominent bur oak component supported 65 fewer species of moths than larger bur oak-dominated savanna remnants [238]. The barrens dagger moth (Acronicta albarufa)
is declining in the northeastern United States. At the caterpillar stage it feeds on bur oak. Land development and fire exclusion threaten the barrens dagger moth [179]. Within the moth's range in Manitoba, bur oak is the only caterpillar food available [210].
Climate change responses: Bur oak range expansions are predicted in many but not all climate change models. A northern expansion of bur oak's range was predicted from climate change models, assuming that bur oak successfully colonized all habitats made suitable by climate change [166]. Based on model simulations, bur oak was expected to increase in abundance with a 9 °F (5 °C) increase in the annual temperature in northwestern Wisconsin [103]. Conversions from boreal forests to grassland savannas or temperate forests are expected with warmer climates in Minnesota's Boundary Waters Canoe Area. Bur oak is expected to expand its range with increasing temperatures in the area. When warm, dry climates prevailed 8,000 to 5,000 years before present, oak species increased their range to the northeast. Oak species ranges decreased in the last 3,000 years with cool climates [77]. In the eastern United States, bur oak's importance is predicted to decrease with climate change and a doubling of current carbon dioxide levels [123].
Although rarely addressed in climate change analyses, the effects of bur oak pests will likely affect distribution changes associated with climate change. For a discussion of current, common bur oak pests
and diseases, see the following reviews [125,201].
  • 20. Beardmore, Tannis; Loo, Judy; McAfee, Brenda; Malouin, Christian; Simpson, Dale. 2006. A survey of tree species of concern in Canada: the role for genetic conservation. The Forestry Chronicle. 82(3): 351-363. [63693]
  • 125. Johnson, Paul S. 1990. Quercus macrocarpa Michx. bur oak. In: Burns, Russell M.; Honkala, Barbara H., technical coordinators. Silvics of North America. Volume 2. Hardwoods. Agric. Handb. 654. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service: 686-692. [82254]
  • 167. McPhee, Donnie A.; Loo, Jude A. 2009. Past and present distribution of New Brunswick bur oak populations: a case for conservation. Northeastern Naturalist. 16(1): 85-100. [82165]
  • 201. Risser, P. G.; Birney, E. C.; Blocker, H. D.; May, S. W.; Parton, W. J.; Wiens, J. A. 1981. The true prairie ecosystem. US/IBP Synthesis Series 16. Stroudsburg, PA: Hutchinson Ross Publishing. 557 p. [16874]
  • 77. Frelich, Lee E.; Reich, Peter B. 2009. Wilderness conservation in an era of global warming and invasive species: a case study from Minnesota's Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness. Natural Areas Journal. 29(4): 385-393. [77775]
  • 103. He, Hong S.; Mladenoff, David J.; Gustafson, Eric J. 2002. Study of landscape change under forest harvesting and climate warming-induced fire disturbance. Forest Ecology and Management. 155: 257-270. [40715]
  • 123. Iverson, Louis R.; Prasad, Anantha M. 1998. Predicting abundance of 80 tree species following climate change in the eastern United States. Ecological Monographs. 68(4): 465-485. [29327]
  • 166. McKenney, Daniel W.; Pedlar, John H.; Lawrence, Kevin; Campbell, Kathy; Hutchinson, Michael F. 2007. Potential impacts of climate change on the distribution of North American trees. BioScience. 57(11): 939-948. [70374]
  • 238. Summerville, Keith S.; Steichen, Renae M.; Lewis, Michelle N. 2005. Restoring lepidopteran communities to oak savannas: contrasting influences of habitat quantity and quality. Restoration Ecology. 13(1): 120-128. [60397]
  • 179. New York Natural Heritage Program. 2008. New York Natural Heritage Program Conservation Guide: Barrens dagger moth (Acronicta albarufa), [Online]. In: Animal guides. New York Natural Heritage Program (Producer). Available: http://acris.nynhp.org/guide.php?id=8081 [2008, September 8]. [71014]
  • 209. Schneider, Rick E.; Faber-Langendoen, Don; Crawford, Rex C.; Weakley, Alan S. 1997. The status of biodiversity in the Great Plains: Great Plains vegetation classification--Supplemental document 1, [Online]. [Cooperative Agreement # X 007803-01-3]. In: Ostlie, Wayne R.; Schneider, Rick E.; Aldrich, Janette Marie; Faust, Thomas M.; McKim, Robert L. B.; Chaplin, Stephen J., comps. The status of biodiversity in the Great Plains. Arlington, VA: The Nature Conservancy, Great Plains Program (Producer). 75 p. Available: http://conserveonline.org/docs/2005/02/greatplains_vegclass_97.pdf [2006, May 16]. [62020]
  • 210. Schweitzer, Dale F. 2007. Comprehensive species report - Acronicta albarufa, Barrens dagger moth, [Online]. In: NatureServe Explorer: an online encyclopedia of life. Version 7.0. Arlington, VA: NatureServe (Producer). Available: http://www.natureserve.org/explorer/servlet/NatureServe?loadTemplate= tabular_report.wmt&paging=home&save=all&sourceTemplate=reviewMiddle.wmt [2008, September 17]. [71015]

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Cultivars, improved and selected materials (and area of origin)

Contact your local Natural Resources Conservation Service (formerly Soil Conservation Service) office for more information. Look in the phone book under ”United States Government.” The Natural Resources Conservation Service will be listed under the subheading “Department of Agriculture.”

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USDA NRCS National Plant Data Center & the Biota of North America Program

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Bur oak may be transplanted or it is easily propagated from seed. Seed should be stored over winter in a cool, moist place at 1–4 C. Germination frequency may be enhanced by stratifying 30–60 days at 1–5 C. but stratification is not required for germination, except for var. oliviformis, which typically germinates during the spring. Most natural seed germination occurs during the fall (directly after maturation) but seed may be planted in either the spring or fall. Seeds should be planted 1.2–2.5 centimeters deep, in groups of 2–3, spaced at roughly 2 meter intervals.

Although strong and rapid development of the taproot contribute to difficulty in transplanting, bur oak saplings can be obtained in ball-and-burlap and they may be transplanted as young plants from containers. Transplants are best made in spring.

Bur oak bark is thick and fire-resistant and larger trees often survive fire. Grass fires often kill only seedlings and young trees, but even seedlings may survive unless fires occur at short intervals or with enough intensity of heat. Top-killed smaller trees (or those mechanically damaged) sprout vigorously from the stump or root crown after fire. In areas of frequent fire and strong herbivore browsing, the underground portions may be much older and more extensive than the continually resprouting aerial portions. Where fire suppression is prevalent, bur oak communities may be replaced by more shade-tolerant maple-basswood forests.

Few insects or diseases cause serious damage to bur oak. Oak lacebug (Corythucha arcuata) may heavily defoliate bur oaks in shelterbelt plantings, especially during dry weather. Oak wilt (Ceratocystis fagacearum) is a less serious problem in bur oak than in species of red oak, but the disease sometimes spreads through root grafts of adjacent trees, and entire groves have been killed by the gradual expansion of the disease from one center of infection.

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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Value for rehabilitation of disturbed sites

More info for the terms: reclamation, tree

Survival and persistence of bur oak have been reported on revegetated mine sites. Bur oak can be established from seed or seedlings and grows well with herbaceous species but is not recommended for spoils with a pH less than 4. Guidelines for use and planting of bur oak are available in Vogel's guide [257]. Survival of bur oak was as high as 75% on surface coal mine reclamation sites in Wyoming and Colorado; bur oak did not survive on the uranium surface mine site [119]. A review of Forest Service records showed that bur oak survival averaged 39% on coal mine spoils in Missouri, Kansas, and/or Oklahoma. Age of spoils ranged from 1 to 16 years old, and pH ranged from 2.4 to 8.1 (review by [256]). On coal mine spoils in Ohio, 1st-year bur oak survival was among the best of the tree species seeded [152]. Bur oak survival averaged 28% at the end of the 4th growing season on surface mine sites in eastern Kentucky, where the pH was 4.5 and available phosphorus was low to very low [193]. On another surface mine site in eastern Kentucky, bur oak survival was reported as 68% in the 5th year [241]. In Laurel County, Kentucky, bur oak was still present 18 years after planting on a coal surface mine site [245].
  • 119. Howard, Gene S.; Rauzi, Frank; Schuman, Gerald E. 1979. Woody plant trials at six mine reclamation sites in Wyoming and Colorado. Production Res. Rep. PRR 177/1/79. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture. 14 p. [42428]
  • 152. Limstrom, G. A.; Merz, R. W. 1949. Rehabilitation of lands stripped for coal in Ohio. Tech. Pap. No. 113. Columbus, OH: The Ohio Reclamation Association. 41 p. In cooperation with: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Central States Forest Experiment Station. [4427]
  • 193. Plass, William T. 1975. An evaluation of trees and shrubs for planting surface-mine spoils. Res. Pap. NE-317. Upper Darby, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station. 8 p. [46129]
  • 245. Thompson, Ralph L.; Vogel, Willis G.; Taylor, David D. 1984. Vegetation and flora of a coal surface-mined area in Laurel County, Kentucky. Castanea. 49(3): 111-126. [75263]
  • 256. Vogel, Willis G. 1977. Revegetation of surface-mined lands in the East. In: Forests for people: A challenge in world affairs: Proceedings of the Society of American Foresters 1977 national convention; 1977 October 2-6; Albuquerque, NM. Washington, DC: Society of American Foresters: 167-172. [9949]
  • 257. Vogel, Willis G. 1981. A guide for revegetating coal minespoils in the eastern United States. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-68. Broomall, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station. 190 p. [15577]
  • 241. Tackett, Edward M.; Graves, Donald H. 1983. Evaluation of direct-seeding of tree species on surface mine spoils after five years. In: Symposium on surface mining, hydrology, sedimentology and reclamation: Proceedings; 1983 November 27 - December 2; Lexington, KY. [Lexington, KY]: [University of Kentucky, College of Engineering]: 437-441. [72089]

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Importance to Livestock and Wildlife

More info for the terms: avoidance, cover, forbs, frequency, mast, presence, reclamation, selection, shrubs

Bur oak acorns and stems are consumed by a variety of wildlife and livestock species. Bur oak acorns are eaten by black bears, deer, cattle, goats, squirrels, cottontails, mice, and other rodents [26,121,125,157,202,252]. Several bird species utilize bur oak trees or communities for nesting and for foraging (reviews by [88,230]). In Manitoba and Saskatchewan, bur oak is browsed by deer, moose, and rabbits. When browsing pressure is heavy, bur oak may be dwarfed and/or less abundant [23].

Black bears: Acorns are an important fall food for black bears (review by [203]). In northeastern Minnesota, mature bur oak and northern red oak (Quercus rubra) stands make up only 0.5% of the Superior National Forest, but based on radio-tracked movements, they are very important to black bears. In mast years, acorns are an important food source [202].

Native ungulates: Many studies indicate that bur oak is browsed by deer and elk. Of 8 forest stand types in Riding Mountain National Park, Manitoba, ungulates browsed the bur oak type most heavily [42]. In South Dakota's Wind Cave National Park, bur oak seedlings are browsed by deer and elk, and bison trails occur in bur oak stands [157]. Bur oak is considered moderately important browse and cover for white-tailed deer and mule deer in the Black Hills of South Dakota and Wyoming [79,185]. Browse availability and herbivore stomach content analyses suggest that bur oak is more palatable to white-tailed deer in the fall or winter than in the spring or summer in the Black Hills [111]. Stomach content analyses of white-tailed deer and mule deer from the Black Hills revealed that the frequency and volume of bur oak in diets from January to April was 53% and 2.5%, respectively [112].

Small mammals: Field observations and captive feeding trials indicate that bur oak is important to many small mammals. Scatter-hoarding of bur oak acorns was observed near Manhattan, Kansas [228]. Deer mice and white-footed mice were common in bur oak woodlands along the Missouri River in South Dakota. White-footed mice were most abundant in mid-seral bur oak communities, and deer mice were most abundant in early-seral bur oak communities. Cover of bur oak, forbs, and shrubs increased from early- to late-seral communities [207]. In lab feeding trials, live-trapped eastern gray squirrels and eastern fox squirrels preferred bur oak acorns over many other oak acorns, black walnuts, and shagbark hickory nuts [223]. However, in another feeding trial, bur oak acorns were not preferred by eastern fox squirrels. Bur oak ranked 9th out of the 12 acorn species fed. In the habitats where eastern fox squirrels were trapped, bur oak was scarce to nonexistent, suggesting that squirrels without prior exposure to bur oak might avoid it [184]. In feeding experiments using white-footed mice trapped from eastern Kansas, researchers found that prior experience may affect acorn selection. White-footed mice trapped from a white oak forest in eastern Kansas ate more bur oak acorns than mice from red oak or oak-free habitats [35].

Game birds: Bur oak provides cover and forage for sharp-tailed grouse and wild turkeys ([71,113,178], review by [230]). In Oklahoma, wild turkeys use bur oak for roosting (review by [230]). Grassland-bur oak woodland edges were important habitat for wild turkey broods in Gregory County, South Dakota [58]. Wild turkey hens selected woodlands over grasslands for nesting (P<0.05). Of 8 woodland nests, 4 were next to bur oak and 1 was under a currant (Ribes spp.) next to a bur oak [263]. Frequency of bur oak in crops from wild turkeys killed in the fall was 80% in 1985. Bur oak was lacking from crops in 1984, which likely reflected a failure in bur oak acorn production and not avoidance by wild turkeys. Bur oak woodlands made up 26% of the study area [147].

Other birds: Various other bird species use bur oak for forage and habitat. In east-central Minnesota, bird communities in prairie, oak savanna, and oak woodlands were compared. Bird species presence and abundance were greatest in oak savannas dominated by bur oak, northern pin oak, or northern red oak [14]. In the Black Hills of South Dakota, bur oak was used by several cavity-nesting birds including mountain bluebirds, white-breasted nuthatches, and northern flickers. White-breasted nuthatches used 50 to 100% of bur oak cavities available [82]. Oaks (bur oak, northern red oak, and chinkapin oak) were preferred by winter-foraging birds in the Brownfield Woods of Illinois. White-breasted nuthatches, Eurasian treecreepers, red-bellied woodpeckers, and downy woodpeckers utilized oaks most [269].

Several studies indicate that bur oak is important for birds belonging to the woodpecker (Picidae) family. The winter diet of red-headed woodpeckers is primarily hard mast. Red-headed woodpeckers will migrate out of Kansas when bur oak acorn crops fail (review by [224]). In the Brownfield Woods of Illinois, bur oak was utilized by 17% of red-bellied woodpeckers and 8% of red-headed woodpeckers. Woodlands in the study area were dominated by sugar maple, hackberry, and northern red oak [197]. A review of Illinois birds reports that bur oak provides food and habitat for woodpeckers. Several woodpecker species in Illinois feed on bur oak acorns, although they rarely comprise a large proportion of diets. About 25% to 30% of bur oak were drilled for sap by yellow-bellied sapsuckers. Northern flickers used bur oak for nest sites [88].

Livestock: Both cattle and goats are reported to browse bur oak. On prairie remnants in northwestern Illinois, bur oak was "preferred" by dairy goats [26].

Although cattle may be poisoned by a diet of more than 50% oak (Quercus spp.) [264], studies suggest that cattle do not avoid bur oak. On a coal mine reclamation site in Kansas, researchers reported that bur oak seedlings planted within reach of cattle were browsed almost to ground level each year [213]. Seasonal preferences may occur in some years. In the Black Hills of South Dakota, bur oak made up less than 4% of June and July, 12% of August and October, and 25.6% of September diets [252]. In another year in the Black Hills, bur oak made up 13.2% of June, 8.7% of July, 12.2% of August, and 12.4% of September diets [254].

Palatability and/or nutritional value: Bur oak acorns and browse are considered palatable and nutritious. Bur oak protein was highest in the summer, and fiber was highest in the spring in the Black Hills of South Dakota [79]. Bur oak acorns from Missouri had 4,340 calories/g [223], and bur oak acorns collected in Louisiana had 4,266 calories/g [41]. Nutritional value of bur oak buds, twigs, and acorns collected in the winter from South Dakota and Wyoming is presented by Severson and Kranz [214].

  • 147. Laudenslager, Scott L.; Flake, Lester D. 1987. Fall food habits of wild turkeys in south central South Dakota. Prairie Naturalist. 19(1): 37-40. [251]
  • 14. Au, Leakhena; Andersen, David E.; David, Mark. 2008. Patterns in bird community structure related to restoration of Minnesota dry oak savannas and across a prairie to oak woodland ecological gradient. Natural Areas Journal. 28(4): 330-341. [82454]
  • 23. Bird, Ralph D. 1961. Ecology of the aspen parkland of western Canada in relation to land use. Contribution No. 27. Ottawa: Canada Department of Agriculture, Research Branch. 153 p. [15620]
  • 26. Blackmore, Mary. 1999. Dairy goats as tools for controlling woody vegetation on prairie remnants. In: Springer, J. T., ed. The central Nebraska loess hills prairie: Proceedings of the 16th North American prairie conference; 1998 July 26-29; Kearney, NE. No. 16. Kearney, NE: University of Nebraska: 243-249. [46837]
  • 35. Briggs, John M.; Smith, Kimberly G. 1989. Influence of habitat on acorn selection by Peromyscus leucopus. Journal of Mammalogy. 70(1): 35-43. [10387]
  • 42. Caners, R. T.; Kenkel, N. C. 2003. Forest stand structure and dynamics at Riding Mountain National Park, Manitoba, Canada. Community Ecology. 4(2): 185-204. [49546]
  • 58. Day, Keith S.; Flake, Lester D.; Tucker, W. Lee. 1991. Movements and habitat use by wild turkey hens with broods in a grassland-woodland mosaic in the northern plains. Prairie Naturalist. 23(2): 73-83. [18061]
  • 71. Flake, Lester D.; Lehman, Chad P.; Leif, Anthony P.; Rumble, Mark A.; Thompson, Daniel J. 2006. The wild turkey in South Dakota. B747. Brookings, SD: South Dakota State University, College of Agriculture and Biological Sciences; South Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station. 189 p. [67887]
  • 79. Gastler, George F.; Moxon, Alvin L.; McKean, William T. 1951. Composition of some plants eaten by deer in the Black Hills of South Dakota. Journal of Wildlife Management. 15(4): 352-357. [3996]
  • 82. Gentry, Dale J.; Vierling, Kerri T. 2008. Reuse of woodpecker cavities in the breeding and non-breeding seasons in old burn habitats in the Black Hills, South Dakota. The American Midland Naturalist. 160(2): 413-429. [73021]
  • 88. Graber, Jean W.; Graber, Richard R.; Kirk, Ethelyn L. 1977. Illinois birds: Picidae. Biological Notes No. 102. Urbana, IL: State of Illinois, Department of Registration and Education; Natural History Survey Division, Natural History Survey. 73 p. [64983]
  • 111. Hill, Ralph R. 1946. Palatability ratings of Black Hills plants for white-tailed deer. Journal of Wildlife Management. 10(1): 47-54. [3270]
  • 112. Hill, Ralph R.; Harris, Dave. 1943. Food preferences of Black Hills deer. Journal of Wildlife Management. 7(2): 233-235. [67155]
  • 113. Hillman, Conrad N.; Jackson, Warren W. 1973. The sharp-tailed and prairie grouse in South Dakota. Technical Bulletin Number 3. Pierre, SD: South Dakota Department of Game, Fish, and Parks. 61 p. [76559]
  • 121. Hunter, Carl G. 1989. Trees, shrubs, and vines of Arkansas. Little Rock, AR: The Ozark Society Foundation. 207 p. [21266]
  • 125. Johnson, Paul S. 1990. Quercus macrocarpa Michx. bur oak. In: Burns, Russell M.; Honkala, Barbara H., technical coordinators. Silvics of North America. Volume 2. Hardwoods. Agric. Handb. 654. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service: 686-692. [82254]
  • 157. Magruder, T. L. 1985. Wind Cave's riparian habitats. South Dakota Conservation Digest. 52(3): 20-23. [13752]
  • 178. Nemick, Joseph J. 1987. Sharp-tailed grouse management and ecology in Wyoming. In: Fisser, Herbert G., ed. Wyoming shrublands: Proceedings, 16th Wyoming shrub ecology workshop; 1987 May 26-27; Sundance, WY. Laramie, WY: University of Wyoming, Department of Range Management, Wyoming Shrub Ecology Workshop: 45-47. [13920]
  • 184. Ofcarcik, R. P.; Burns, E. E.; Teer, J. G. 1973. Acceptance of selected acorns by captive fox squirrels. The Southwestern Naturalist. 17(4): 349-355. [11365]
  • 185. Olson, Rich. 1992. White-tailed deer habitat requirements and management in Wyoming. B-964. Laramie, WY: University of Wyoming, Cooperative Extension Service. 17 p. [20678]
  • 197. Reller, Ann Willbern. 1972. Aspects of behavioral ecology of red-headed and red-bellied woodpeckers. The American Midland Naturalist. 88(2): 270-290. [61970]
  • 202. Rogers, Lynn L. 1987. Effects of food supply and kinship on social behavior, movements, and population growth of black bears in northeastern Minnesota. Wildlife Monographs No. 97. Washington, DC: The Wildlife Society. 72 p. [68405]
  • 203. Rogers, Lynn L.; Allen, Arthur W. 1987. Habitat suitability index models: black bear, upper Great Lakes region. Biological Report 82(10.144). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service. 54 p. [11711]
  • 207. Rumble, Mark A.; Gobeille, John E. 2001. Small mammals in successional prairie woodlands of the northern Great Plains. Res. Pap. RMRS-RP-28. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 9 p. [38088]
  • 213. Seidel, Kenneth W.; Brinkman, Kenneth A. 1962. Mixed or pure walnut plantings on strip-mined land in Kansas? Tech. Pap. 187. Columbus, OH: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Central Forest Experiment Station. 10 p. [22161]
  • 223. Smith, Christopher C.; Follmer, David. 1972. Food preferences of squirrels. Ecology. 53: 82-91. [2942]
  • 224. Smith, Kimberly G.; Withgott, James H.; Rodewald, Paul G. 2000. Red-headed woodpecker--Melanerpes erythrocephalus. In: Poole, A.; Gill, F., eds. The birds of North America. No. 518. Philadelphia, PA: The Academy of Natural Sciences; Washington, DC: The American Ornithologists' Union: 1-27. [61928]
  • 228. Stapanian, Martin A.; Smith, Christopher C. 1984. Density-dependent survival of scatterhoarded nuts: an experimental approach. Ecology. 65(5): 1387-1396. [10380]
  • 230. Steffen, David E.; Lafon, Nelson W.; Norman, Gary W. 2002. Turkeys, acorns, and oaks. In: McShea, William J.; Healy, William M., eds. Oak forest ecosystems: Ecology and management for wildlife. Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press: 241-255. [43534]
  • 252. Uresk, Daniel W. 1987. Diets of cattle in the Black Hills of South Dakota. In: Fisser, Herbert G., ed. Wyoming shrublands: Proceedings, 16th Wyoming shrub ecology workshop; 1987 May 26-27; Sundance, WY. Laramie, WY: University of Wyoming, Department of Range Management, Wyoming Shrub Ecology Workshop: 33-35. [13916]
  • 254. Uresk, Daniel W.; Paintner, Wayne W. 1985. Cattle diets in a ponderosa pine forest in the northern Black Hills. Journal of Range Management. 38(5): 440-442. [2401]
  • 263. Wertz, Tara L.; Flake, Lester D. 1988. Wild turkey nesting ecology in south central South Dakota. Prairie Naturalist. 20(1): 29-37. [9335]
  • 264. Whitson, Thomas D. 1987. Weeds in Wyoming causing livestock poisoning. In: Fisser, Herbert G., ed. Wyoming shrublands: Proceedings, 16th Wyoming shrub ecology workshop; 1987 May 26-27; Sundance, WY. Laramie, WY: University of Wyoming, Department of Range Management: 55-57. [13922]
  • 269. Willson, Mary F. 1970. Foraging behavior of some winter birds of deciduous woods. The Condor. 72(2): 169-174. [61918]
  • 41. Burns, Thomas A.; Viers, Charles E., Jr. 1973. Caloric and moisture content values of selected fruits and mast. Journal of Wildlife Management. 37(4): 585-587. [41689]
  • 214. Severson, Kieth E.; Kranz, Jeremiah J. 1978. Management of bur oak on deer winter range. Wildlife Society Bulletin. 6(4): 212-216. [82170]

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Other uses and values

Acorns produced by species within the white oak group are considered palatable and were preferred by American Indians and early European settlers [159]. The Cheyenne of Montana ate bur oak acorns in a mush mixed with buffalo fat [100].
  • 100. Hart, Jeffrey A. 1981. The ethnobotany of the Northern Cheyenne Indians of Montana. Journal of Ethnopharmacology. 4: 1-55. [35893]
  • 159. Martin, Alexander C.; Zim, Herbert S.; Nelson, Arnold L. 1951. American wildlife and plants. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company. 500 p. [4021]

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Special Uses

Acorns of bur oak make up much of the food of red squirrels and  are also eaten by wood ducks, white-tailed deer, New England  cottontails, mice, thirteen-lined ground squirrels, and other  rodents (5).

    On coal-mine spoils with a pH of 5.6 in eastern Kansas, planted  bur oak was one of the better performers of several tree species  tested (7). After 22 years, it attained a mean height of 8.5 m  (28 ft) and a d.b.h. of 12.2 cm (4.8 in). The species is also  widely planted in shelterbelts because of its drought tolerance.

  • Burns, Russell M., and Barbara H. Honkala, technical coordinators. 1990. Silvics of North America: 1. Conifers; 2. Hardwoods.   Agriculture Handbook 654 (Supersedes Agriculture Handbook 271,Silvics of Forest Trees of the United States, 1965).   U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Washington, DC. vol.2, 877 pp.   http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/silvics_manual/table_of_contents.htm External link.
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Paul S. Johnson

Source: Silvics of North America

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Uses

Industry: Bur oak wood is used for cabinetry, barrels, hardwood flooring, and fence posts. Main sources of trees for timber are Iowa and Illinois bottomlands. The wood is sometimes marketed as ‘white oak.’

Ethnobotanic: Native Americans made a bark decoction with astringent properties used to treat diarrhea, wounds and sores, hemorrhoids, poison oak, and insect bites. The large, sweet acorns have been eaten boiled and raw.

Wildlife: The acorns are eaten by many birds and mammals, including squirrels, rabbits, ground squirrels, mice, deer, wood ducks, and blue jays. They are dispersed by rodents and blue jays, which frequently cache the acorns for later use. The foliage is eaten by deer and cattle. Red-tailed hawks, screech owls, fox squirrels, and flying squirrels nest in large trees of bur oak.

Conservation: Bur oak is tolerant of city smoke and other air pollutants and of soils that are compacted, sandy, and/or of high pH – it is commonly planted as a shade tree in many urban areas of the United States. The trees become large and are suited for lawns and other open areas, including golf courses, parks, large

islands, and fields. They also are useful in rehabilitation of degraded sites and have been widely planted in shelterbelts because of their drought tolerance. A deep tap root system penetrates to lowered water tables during the dry periods.

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USDA NRCS National Plant Data Center & the Biota of North America Program

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

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Wikipedia

Quercus macrocarpa

"Bur Oak" redirects here. For places named after the oak, see Burr Oak (disambiguation).

Quercus macrocarpa, the Bur oak, sometimes spelled Burr oak, is a species of oak in the white oak section Quercus sect. Quercus, native to North America in the eastern and midwestern United States and south-central Canada. This plant is also called Mossycup oak and Mossycup white oak.

It occurs from the Appalachian Mountains west to the middle of the Great Plains, extending to central Texas, across southernmost Manitoba, Ontario and Quebec, east to the Atlantic Coast in southern New Brunswick and down the coast to Delaware.

Description[edit]

Quercus macrocarpa is a large deciduous tree growing up to 30 m (100 ft), rarely 40 m (130 ft), in height, and is one of the most massive oaks with a trunk diameter of up to 3 m (10 ft); reports of taller trees occur, but have not been verified. It is one of the slowest-growing oaks, with a growth rate of 30 cm (1 ft) per year when young. A 20-year-old tree will be about 6 m (20 ft) tall. It commonly lives to be 200 to 300 years old, and may live up to 400 years.[1] The bark is a medium gray and somewhat rugged.

The leaves are 7–15 cm (3–6 in) long and 5–13 cm (2–5 in) broad, variable in shape, with a lobed margin. Most often, the basal 60% is narrower and deeply lobed, while the apical 40% is wider and has shallow lobes or large teeth. The flowers are greenish-yellow catkins, produced in the spring. The acorns are very large, 2–5 cm (0.8–2 in) long and 2–4 cm (0.8-1.5 in) broad, having a large cup that wraps much of the way around the nut, with large overlapping scales and often a fringe at the edge of the cup.

Bur Oak is sometimes confused with Overcup oak and White oak, both of which it occasionally hybridizes with.

Acorns
Acorns

The acorns are the largest of any North American oak (thus the Latin species name macrocarpa—large fruit), and are an important wildlife food; American Black Bears sometimes tear off branches to get them. However, heavy nut crops are borne only every few years. In this evolutionary strategy, known as masting, the large seed crop every few years overwhelms the ability of seed predators to eat the acorns, thus ensuring the survival of some seeds. Other wildlife, such as deer and porcupine, eat the leaves, twigs and bark. Cattle are heavy browsers in some areas. The bur oak is the only known foodplant of Bucculatrix recognita caterpillars.

Ecology[edit]

Bur Oak typically grows in the open, away from forest canopy. For this reason, it is an important tree on the eastern prairies, often found near waterways in otherwise more forested areas, where there is a break in the canopy. It is a fire-resistant tree, and possesses significant drought resistance by virtue of a long taproot.[2] New trees, after two to three years of growth, may have a 1–2 m deep taproot. The West Virginia state champion Bur Oak has a trunk diameter of almost 3 m (9 feet).

Bark of Quercus macrocarpa var. oliviformis

The bur oak is among the most fire-tolerant tree species. One of its most common habitats, especially in Midwestern United States, is the oak savanna, where fires often occurred in early spring or late fall, especially in hill country.

Winter form showing characteristic spreading branches

Uses[edit]

The wood is of high quality, and is almost always marketed as "white oak".

Cultivation[edit]

Quercus macrocarpa is cultivated by plant nurseries for use in gardens, parks, and as a street tree. Bur oak makes an outstanding ornamental tree. Among the white oaks, it is one of the most tolerant of urban conditions, and is one of the fastest-growing of the group. It has been planted in many climates, ranging northwards to Anchorage, Alaska, and as far south as Mission, Texas. It withstands chinook conditions in Calgary, Alberta.

Cultural[edit]

The name sometimes is spelled "burr oak", as for example in Burr Oak State Park in Ohio, the city of Burr Oak, Kansas, the village of Burr Oak, Michigan, and in the title Burr Oaks by poet Richard Eberhart.[citation needed]

It is also less commonly called "burl oak", as in the Burl Oaks Country Club in Mound, Minnesota.[citation needed]

Bur oak savanna in Wisconsin hill country

Chemistry[edit]

The dehydrated tergallic acid C-glucoside and tergallic acid O-glucoside can be characterised in the acorns of Q. macrocarpa.[3]

References[edit]

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Notes

Comments

Quercus macrocarpa is one of our most cold-tolerant oak species; it also endures a wide variety of other harsh conditions including poor dry soils and wet, poorly drained, and inundated locations. Putative hybrids with Q . bicolor are common in the northeastern part of its range, where the two species often occur together in wet, poorly drained habitats. The effect of this contact may be partially responsible for morphologic differences across the range of Q . macrocarpa . The large acorns are best developed in the southern part of the range, and a clinal decrease in acorn size and extent of the mossy fringe on the acorn cup seems to occur as one travels from south to north. In the northwest part of its range, Q . macrocarpa varies clinally to smaller, shrubbier forms on bluffs and hillsides, with smaller, less fringed cups, that are the basis of Q . macrocarpa var. depressa (Nuttall) Engelmann and Q . mandanensis Rydberg. These scrubby forms may merit formal recognition after more thorough study; they are treated here as clinal variants of the species. Quercus macrocarpa forms putative hybrids also with Q . alba in the savannah-type regions of the midwest. Putative hybrids with Q . gambelii occur out of the range of Q . macrocarpa . 

 Quercus macrocarpa is the only oak species native to Montana (in the southeast corner). Wood of Q . macrocarpa is similar to that of Q . alba and produces one of the best and most durable oak lumbers.

Native Americans used Quercus macrocarpa medicinally to treat heart troubles, cramps, diarrhea, Italian itch, and broken bones, to expel pinworms, and as an astringent (D. E. Moerman 1986).

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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Flora North America does not recognize Q. macrocarpa var. depressa as a distinct variety, while Kartesz (1999) does.

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More info for the terms: introgression, swamp

The scientific name of bur oak is Quercus macrocarpa Michx. (Fagaceae) [72,133].
Bur oak belongs to the Quercus subgenus and section. The Quercus section has
also been called the white oak, Leucobalanus, or Lepidiobalanus section
[10,28,72].
Two bur oak varieties are recognized by Kartesz [133] but are considered "clinal
variants" by the Flora of North America [72]:
  • Quercus macrocarpa Michx. var. depressa (Nutt.) Engelm.
  • Quercus macrocarpa Michx. var. macrocarpa
When the ranges of the parent species ranges overlap, bur oak may hybridize with other white oaks
(Quercus section):
  • Bebb oak (Quercus × bebbiana) C.K. Schneid., a bur oak × white oak (Q . alba) hybrid occurring in the Midwest [54,72,97,125]
  • Quercus × bechyae Gaynor, a bur oak × dwarf chinkapin oak (Q. prinoides) hybrid suspected from Livingston County, Michigan [54,251]
  • Quercus × burnetensis Little, a bur oak × live oak (Q. virginiana) hybrid reported from Texas [98,125]
  • Quercus× byarsii Sudw., a bur oak × swamp chestnut oak (Q.
    michauxii) hybrid reported from Tennessee [125,251]
  • Quercus × deamii Trel., a bur oak × chinkapin oak (Q. muhlenbergii) hybrid common in the Midwest [19,54,125,156]
  • Quercus × guadalupensis Sarg., a bur oak × post oak (Q.
    stellata) hybrid occurring in Texas [125,251]
  • Quercus × megaleia Laughlin, a bur oak × overcup oak (Q.
    lyrata) hybrid reported from Missouri [125,251]
  • Quercus × schuettei Trel., a bur oak × swamp white oak (Q . bicolor) hybrid common in the northeastern part of bur oak's range [54,68,72,125]
Bur oak has also hybridized with the nonnative, English oak (Q. robur) [125]
and with Gambel oak (Q . gambelii). Bur oak × Gambel oak hybrids are a result of past introgression [208], and hybrids occur outside of bur oak's range in northeastern New Mexico and outside of Gambel oak's range in northeastern Wyoming [44,90,161]. In northeastern New Mexico, researchers
suspect that past hybridization between bur oak and Gambel oak occurred when a moister climate regime prevailed [250].
  • 156. Magee, Dennis W.; Ahles, Harry E. 2007. Flora of the Northeast: A manual of the vascular flora of New England and adjacent New York. 2nd ed. Amherst, MA: University of Massachusetts Press. 1214 p. [74293]
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Common Names

bur oak

mossy-cup oak

prairie oak

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