Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Global Range: Only known occurrence is from the shore of a lake in Washtenaw County, Michigan.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Mich.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Trees , to 15 m; trunks usually several. Bark of mature trunk and branches dark red to reddish brown, smooth, close; lenticels pale, conspicuous, horizontally expanded. Twigs with taste and odor of wintergreen when crushed, glabrous to sparsely pubescent, covered with small resinous glands. Leaf blade ovate with 7--10 pairs of lateral veins, 5--11 × 3--6 cm, base cuneate, margins sharply and obscurely doubly serrate, apex acute or only slightly acuminate; surfaces abaxially sparsely pubescent to glabrous. Infructescences erect, ovoid, 2--4 × 1.5--3 cm, remaining intact for a period after release of fruits in late fall; scales sparsely pubescent to glabrous, lobes ascending, branching at middle, slightly unequal in length. Samaras with wings narrower than body, broadest near summit, not extended beyond body apically. 2 n = 112.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Swamps and edges of bogs and lakes in southern Michigan.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wet, swampy forests containing Betula pumila ; of conservation concern; 0--300m.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 1 - 5

Comments: One occurrence located on University of Michigan's forest properties, in Washtenaw County in southern Michigan.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering late spring.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N1 - Critically Imperiled

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G1 - Critically Imperiled

Reasons: Betula murrayana is known from a single naturally occurring site in Washtenaw County, Michigan. One one individual remains, of the two originally known there in the 1960's. Propagated plants are maintained in cultivation, and a few that were planted at the original site and another site have reached flowering size. The species may have recently evolved through hybridization.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Global Short Term Trend: Relatively stable (=10% change)

Comments: The one remaining individual has survived. Planted individuals at the site are maturing, and have flowered.

Global Long Term Trend: Increase of 10-25% to decline of 30%

Comments: Of the two plants originally known in the 1960's, only one survives. The species has been propagated from cuttings and seed, and a few planted individuals have reached flowering size, including a few reintroduced to the original site.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Threats

Degree of Threat: Very high - high

Comments: The population size is precariously small, with the species known from a single natural occurrence, but no particular other threats have been noted.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Notes

Comments

Betula murrayana is an octoploid derivative of Betula × purpusii (= B . alleghaniensis Britton × B . pumila Linnaeus) (B. V. Barnes and B. P. Dancik 1985). It is intermediate between B . alleghaniensis and B . pumila in most vegetative features, but in characters such as leaf size, it approaches B . alleghaniensis .
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Fertile species formed through hybridization (Barnes and Dancik, 1985; Flora of North America, 1997).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!