Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 57 specimens in 29 taxa.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 19 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0 - 54.9
  Temperature range (°C): 23.227 - 27.099
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.082 - 1.399
  Salinity (PPS): 34.929 - 35.470
  Oxygen (ml/l): 4.572 - 4.923
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.085 - 0.177
  Silicate (umol/l): 0.380 - 2.378

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 0 - 54.9

Temperature range (°C): 23.227 - 27.099

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.082 - 1.399

Salinity (PPS): 34.929 - 35.470

Oxygen (ml/l): 4.572 - 4.923

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.085 - 0.177

Silicate (umol/l): 0.380 - 2.378
 
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Associations

Known predators

Lyngbya (Lyngbya filamentous algae) is prey of:
Sida crystallina
Leptophlebia
Crangonyx gracilis

Based on studies in:
USA: Wisconsin, Little Rock Lake (Lake or pond)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • Martinez ND (1991) Artifacts or attributes? Effects of resolution on the Little Rock Lake food web. Ecol Monogr 61:367–392
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© SPIRE project

Source: SPIRE

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Genomic DNA is available from 1 specimen with morphological vouchers housed at Museum Victoria
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Ocean Genome Legacy

Source: Ocean Genome Resource

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Wikipedia

Lyngbya

Lyngbya is a genus of cyanobacteria, unicellular autotrophs that form the basis of the oceanic food chain.

Lyngbya form long, unbranching filaments inside a rigid mucilage sheath. Sheaths may form tangles or mats, intermixed with other phytoplankton species. Lyngbya reproduce asexually. Their filaments break apart and each cell forms a new filament.[2]

Some Lyngbya cause the human skin irritation called seaweed dermatitis.[3]

Some Lyngbya species can also temporarily monopolize aquatic ecosystems when they form dense floating mats in the water.

References[edit]

Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

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