Overview

Distribution

Greenland; Alta., B.C., Man., N.B., Nfld. and Labr., N.W.T., Nunavut, Ont., Que., Sask., Yukon; Alaska, Maine, Mich., Minn., Mont., N.Y., Vt., Wis., Wyo.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Plants 7–33 cm. Leaves: blades 2.7–11 × 1.2–8 cm. Inflorescences: floral bracts lanceolate to linear, 5–15 × 1–5 mm, apex acute to acuminate. Flowers showy; sepals white to pale magenta, ovate to elliptic-oblong, 6–10 × 3–4 mm; petals white to pale magenta, ovate to lance-oblong, 5–6 mm, less than 1/2 as wide; lip white, prominently magenta-spotted, rarely with broad, longitudinal, reddish bars, ovate in outline, 6–9 × 4–8 mm, lateral lobes spreading, spur conspicuous, 2/3 as long as to equaling lip, slender. Capsules erect, ellipsoid. 2n = 42.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Orchis rotundifolia Banks ex Pursh, Fl. Amer. Sept. 2: 588. 1814; Ponerorchis rotundifolia (Banks ex Pursh) Soó
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Ecology

Habitat

Moist, often calcareous coniferous forests, thickets, fens, tundra; 0--1200m.
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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering Jun--Jul.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Galearis rotundifolia

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Barcode data: Amerorchis rotundifolia

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Amerorchis rotundifolia

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 12
Specimens with Barcodes: 12
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Wikipedia

Galearis rotundifolia

Galearis rotundifolia is a species of flowering plants in the orchid family, Orchidaceae. It is commonly called roundleaf orchis and small round-leaved orchid. It is native to North America, where it occurs throughout Canada, part of the northern United States, and Greenland.[1][2]

Description[edit]

Galearis rotundifolia is a succulent perennial herb growing from a fleshy rhizome. It reaches a maximum height around 33 centimeters. A single leaf clasps the base of the stem. It is variable in shape and size, reaching up to 11 centimeters in length. The inflorescence is a spike of flowers and leaflike bracts occupying the top of the stem.[2] The plant produces up to 18 flowers at a time.[3] The flower has six tepals in shades of white or light magenta; three are sepals up to a centimeter long, and three are shorter, narrower petals. The spurred, lobed lip of the middle petal is white with magenta spots and sometimes bars. There are two pollinaria, which bear the sticky pollen. The fruit is a capsule.[2]

Distribution[edit]

Galearis rotundifolia is native to northern North America, where it is widespread and most abundant at the northern latitudes. It occurs in nearly all of the provinces of Canada, Greenland, Alaska, and the northernmost contiguous United States, including Montana, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Idaho, New York, Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine.[3][4]

Habitat[edit]

Galearis rotundifolia occurs in arctic and boreal climates. In the northern part of its range it is scattered in several habitat types, and in the southern part it is less common and mainly restricted to moist, shady areas. In the Rocky Mountains of Montana, Idaho and Wyoming, for example, it can be found along steams and in wet but well-drained limestone soils in shady spruce forests and woods. It is a glacial relict species.[3][5]

The most important factor in appropriate habitat is a cold substrate.[3] In northern regions it can grow in full sun, while in southern areas it requires shelter. It is sometimes a dwarf plant in exposed areas on tundra. The substrate is usually also moist to wet, but not waterlogged. It is an obligate wetland species in southern areas, and a facultative wetland plant farther north. It also requires calcareous soils with a neutral pH, tolerating only slight acidity.[3]

Biology[edit]

Galearis rotundifolia usually reproduces sexually by seed, but it reportedly undergoes vegetative reproduction at times via rhizome or stolon, or perhaps when a ramet is separated from a clonal colony.[3]

The flowers are pollinated by insects. In a survey of pollinators in Alberta, the primary pollinator was Osmia proxima, a mason bee. Other pollinators included several hoverflies, such as Eriozona laxus, Eristalis hirta, Eristalis rupium, and Eupeodes lapponicus. The insects were observed probing the flower spur with their mouthparts and then getting the sticky pollen wads stuck on their heads as they pushed into the flower.[6] The tiny, light seeds are dispersed on the wind.[3]

Like other orchids, the plant has mycorrhizal associations with fungi in its root system.[3]

Conservation[edit]

In general, Galearis rotundifolia is a widespread and secure species, especially in Canada. It becomes rare on the southern fringes of its range. Threats to the species include over-collection by orchid hunters and poaching of the plant for use as an herbal remedy.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Kew World Checklist of Seleted Plant Families
  2. ^ a b c Amerorchis rotundifolia. Flora of North America.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i Handley, J. and B. Heidel. Amerorchis rotundifolia (Banks ex Pursh) Hultén (roundleaf orchid): A Technical Conservation Assessment. Species Conservation Project. USDA Forest Service Rocky Mountain Region. February 25, 2005.
  4. ^ US Department of Agriculture plant profile
  5. ^ Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Endangered Resources, Round-leaved Orchis (Amerorchis rotundifolia)
  6. ^ Catling, P. M. and B. Kostiuk. (2011). Some observations on the pollination of round-Leaf orchid, Galearis (Amerorchis) rotundifolia, near Jasper, Alberta. The Canadian Field-Naturalist 125(1), 47-54.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Pridgeon, A.M., Cribb, P.J., Chase, M.C. & Rasmussen, F.N. (2001). Orchidoideae (Part 1). Genera Orchidacearum 2: 290 ff. Oxford University Press.
  • Berg Pana, H. (2005). Handbuch der Orchideen-Namen. Dictionary of Orchid Names. Dizionario dei nomi delle orchidee. Ulmer, Stuttgart.
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