Articles on this page are available in 1 other language: Spanish (10) (learn more)

Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Puerto Rico

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Global Range: The only known U.S. population is/was in in Dade County, Florida. Also reported from the Bahamas and Cuba.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Fla.; West Indies (Bahamas).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Plants 30–50 cm. Roots unknown. Stems subterranean, short. Leaves withering at or during anthesis, 3–12; petiole 1–2.5 cm; blade elliptic to ovate, 4–10 × 1.5–3.5 cm, apex obtuse to acute. Inflorescences: peduncle 26–37 cm, partially enclosed by tubular sheaths, proximalmost larger but not leafy; rachis laxly 20–35-flowered, 10–18 cm; floral bracts lanceolate, clasping base of ovary, 5–10 mm, apex acuminate, pubescent. Flowers: sepals green, adaxially pubescent; dorsal sepal distinct, oblong-lanceolate, 4–5 × 2–3 mm, apex acute to obtuse; lateral sepals obliquely ovate-lanceolate, 4–5 × 2.5 mm, apex acute to obtuse; petals recurved, white, indistinctly clawed, obliquely triangular-ovate, 4–4.5 × 1.5 mm, margins entire, apex acute, pubescent; lip subsessile, white with 2 dark green blotches, obovate, 4.5 × 3.5 mm, apex short-caudate; column white, 2.5 mm; pedicellate ovary 7–9 mm. Capsules 8–13 mm.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Ponthieva racemosa (Walter) C. Mohr var. brittoniae (Ames) Luer
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Shallow swales and depressions in open pine rocklands; rarely in hammocks (Florida Natural Areas Inventory).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Open rocky pinelands; 0--20m.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 1 - 5

Comments: Status information in Cuba and Bahamas needed, but apparently rare everywhere; one occurrence known in Florida.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering Dec--early Mar.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Ponthieva brittoniae

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Ponthieva brittoniae

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 2
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Puerto Rico

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N1 - Critically Imperiled

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G3 - Vulnerable

Reasons: Habitat is threatened due to development. Only one record exists in the United States and is located in Everglades National Park, Florida (Florida Natural Areas Inventory). Range is restricted to Florida, Bahamas, and Cuba (Correll & Correll 1982); further information needed on status in Bahamas and in Cuba.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Management

Biological Research Needs: Some field time at known site is required to determine the current status of this species.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Notes

Comments

Most of the original habitat of Ponthieva brittoniae has succumbed to urbanization. Only two locations are known to exist. One consisted of only a single specimen, and plants of the other have not reappeared since 1986 and may have been destroyed by roadwork (C. McCartney 1997).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!