Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Ala., Fla., Ga., La., Miss., N.C., S.C., Tex., Va.; Mexico; West Indies; Central America; South America.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Plants 30–60 cm. Roots 2–3 mm diam. Stems subterranean, short. Leaves green at anthesis, 2–6, subpetiolate; blade elliptic to oblanceolate, 5–17 × 2–5 cm, apex rounded to acute. Inflorescences: peduncle to 25 cm, partially enclosed by tubular sheaths, proximalmost sometimes leafy; rachis laxly 20–35-flowered, 5–25 cm; floral bracts narrowly lanceolate, clasping base of ovary, to 10 mm, apex acuminate, pubescent. Flowers: sepals greenish white, adaxially pubescent; dorsal sepal distinct, ovate-elliptic to elliptic-lanceolate, 4–7 × 2–3 mm, apex obtuse; lateral sepals broadly, obliquely ovate, 4.3–6.5 × 2.5–3.5 mm, apex acute to obtuse; petals white, green-veined, obliquely triangular, 4–6 × 3.5–5 mm, margins minutely ciliate or entire, glabrous; lip white with green, deeply concave center, distinctly clawed, suborbiculate, 5–7 × 5–7 mm, apex short-caudate; column white, 4–5 mm; pedicellate ovary 10–20 mm. Capsules 8–13 mm.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Arethusa racemosa Walter, Fl. Carol., 222. 1788; Neottia glandulosa Sims; Ponthieva glandulosa (Sims) R. Brown
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Ecology

Habitat

Moist, shady hammocks, swamps, ravines, wet savannas, pine forests; 0--50m.
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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering fall--winter (Sep--Feb).
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Ponthieva racemosa

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Ponthieva racemosa

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 6
Specimens with Barcodes: 6
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

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Wikipedia

Ponthieva racemosa

Ponthieva racemosa, commonly called the Hairy Shadow Witch or Racemose Ponthieva, is a species of orchid found from the southeastern United States (from Texas to Virginia), Mexico, Central America, the West Indies and northern South America as far south as Bolivia.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Kew World Checklist of Selected Plant Families
  2. ^ Flora of North America, v 26 p 548, Ponthieva racemosa (Walter) C. Mohr, Contr. U.S. Natl. Herb. 6: 460. 1901.
  3. ^ Biota of North America Program, county distribution map, Ponthieva racemosa
  4. ^ Dressler, R.L. 2003. Orchidaceae. En: Manual de Plantas de Costa Rica. Vol. 3. B.E. Hammel, M.H. Grayum, C. Herrera & N. Zamora (eds.). Monographs in systematic botany from the Missouri Botanical Garden 93: 1–595.
  5. ^ Brako, L. & J. L. Zarucchi. (eds.) 1993. Catalogue of the Flowering Plants and Gymnosperms of Peru. Monographs in systematic botany from the Missouri Botanical Garden 45: i–xl, 1–1286.
  6. ^ Jørgensen, P. M. & S. León-Yánez. (eds.) 1999. Cat. Vasc. Pl. Ecuador, Monographs in systematic botany from the Missouri Botanical Garden 75: i–viii, 1–1181. Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis
  7. ^ Correa A., M.D., C. Galdames & M. Stapf. 2004. Catálogo de las Plantas Vasculares de Panamá 1–599. Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panamá
  8. ^ Schlechter, Friedrich Richard Rudolf. 1923. Repertorium Specierum Novarum Regni Vegetabilis, Beihefte 19: 84.
  9. ^ Reichenbach, Heinrich Gustav. 1866. Beitrage zu einer Orchideenkunde Central-Amerika's 63.
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Notes

Comments

In Florida, Ponthieva racemosa is self-compatible but not autogamous. Natural fruit-set in one population in northern Florida was 35% (J. D. Ackerman 1995). In Florida, small halictid bees were observed visiting the flowers (C. A. Luer 1972).
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