Overview

Distribution

Range Description

The largest subpopulation is in Paget Marsh.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
An endemic species confined to the few remaining patches of lowland dry or marshy scrub.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Sabal bermudana

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Sabal bermudana

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 2
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
EN
Endangered

Red List Criteria
B1+2cd

Version
2.3

Year Assessed
1998
  • Needs updating

Assessor/s
Johnson, D.

Reviewer/s

Contributor/s
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Threats

Major Threats
This ornamental palm tree is widely cultivated and traded internationally.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Natural stands are protected under the Tree Preservation Orders and the Woodland Preservation Orders.
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Wikipedia

Sabal bermudana

Sabal bermudana, commonly known as the Bermuda Palmetto or Bibby-tree, is one of 15 species of palm trees in the genus Sabal and is endemic to Bermuda although reportedly naturalized in the Leeward Islands.[2] It was greatly affected by the introduction of non-native plants such as the Chinese Fan-Palm, which created competition for space that it usually lost.[3]

Description[edit]

Sabal bermudana grows up to 25 m (82 ft) in height, with the occasional old tree growing up to 30 m (98 ft) in height, with a trunk up to 55 cm (22 in) in diameter. It is a fan palm (Arecaceae tribe Corypheae), with the leaves with a bare petiole terminating in a rounded fan of numerous leaflets. Each leaf is 1.5–2 m (4.9–6.6 ft) long, with 45-60 leaflets up to 75 cm (30 in) long. The flowers are yellowish-white, 5 mm (0.20 in) across, produced in large panicles up to 2.5 m (8.2 ft) long, extending out beyond the leaves. The fruit is a deep brown to black drupe about 1 cm (0.39 in) long containing a single seed. It is extremely salt-tolerant and is often seen growing near the Atlantic Ocean coast in Bermuda, and also frost-tolerant, surviving short periods of temperatures as low as -14 °C, although it will never get that cold in Bermuda.[4]

Uses[edit]

Bermudians used to use, for a short period, the leaflets of the palm to weave into hats and export them to the United Kingdom and other countries. Sabal bermudana also had hole drilled into its trunk and sap extracted to make "bibby", a strong alcoholic beverage.

During the 17th century, most houses in Bermuda had palmetto-thatched roofs.

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