Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: A Southeastern Coastal Plain endemic, ranging from southeastern North Carolina south to Florida and west to Louisiana (Weakley, 1996) and Texas (Kartesz, 1998).

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Ala., Fla., Ga., La., Miss., N.C., S.C., Tex., Va.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Plants 15–50 cm. Roots numerous, mostly to 1 cm diam., stout. Leaves fugacious or persisting through anthesis, to 3–5, cauline, reduced to sheathing bracts upward on stem, spreading, linear-lanceolate, keeled, 5–15 × 0.5 cm, rigid. Inflorescences: spikes loosely to tightly spiraled, usually no more than 180°, 5–9 flowers per cycle of spiral, sometimes secund; rachis sparsely pubescent, some trichomes capitate, glands obviously stalked. Flowers mostly horizontal, strongly gaping, white to cream; sepals distinct to base, lanceolate, tapering in distal 1/3, (8–)9–10 × 2–3 mm; lateral sepals widely spreading; petals linear, slightly falcate, 7–9 × 2–2.5 mm; lip yellow centrally, ovate in general outline, base rounded-dilated, apical portion descending, oblong, 8–11 × 4 mm, apex recurved with margin crisped; basal calli erect, tapered, to 1 mm; viscidium linear-lanceolate; ovary mostly 7 mm. Seeds monoembryonic.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Ibidium longilabre (Lindley) House
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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Swamps, marshes, wet savannahs, and meadows (Radford, 1968).

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Primarily on coastal plain in dry to moist meadows, pine flatwoods and savannas, fields, roadsides; 0--50m.
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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering Oct--Dec.
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N3 - Vulnerable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G3 - Vulnerable

Reasons: A Southeastern Coastal Plain endemic, Spiranthes longilabris is known from North and South Carolina, where it is rare, south to Florida and west to Texas. This taxon is threatened by an increase in competing grass-sedge and woody vegetation which develops in the absence of fire. Drainage of sites would eliminate this species.

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Threats

Comments: Threatened by an increase in competing grass-sedge and woody vegetation which develops in the absence of fire. Drainage of the site would eliminate this species.

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Notes

Comments

Hybrids of Spiranthes longilabris and S. odorata are known as Spiranthes × folsomii P. M. Brown.
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