Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: Eastern Great Plains, Great Lakes and Midwest regions, with disjunct populations in Utah, Colorado, New Mexico and Alabama-Mississippi (Luer 1975). Also into Ontario and Manitoba (Kartesz unpublished data 1995).

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Man., Ont.; Ala., Ark., Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kans., Ky., La., Mich., Minn., Miss., Mo., Nebr., N.Mex., N.Dak., Ohio, Okla., Pa., S.Dak., Tex., Va., Wis.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Plants 7–60 cm. Roots few, descending, tuberous, mostly to 0.8 cm diam. Leaves fugaceous or rarely persisting to anthesis, basal, ascending, linear-lanceolate to oblanceolate, to 16 × 1.5 cm. Spikes usually very tightly spiraled, 3–4 flowers per cycle of spiral; rachis moderately pubescent, some trichomes capitate, glands obviously stalked (longest trichomes 0.2–0.52 mm). Flowers abruptly nodding from base, white to ivory, gaping, lip not strongly curving from claw, not urceolate; sepals distinct to base, 5–14 mm; lateral sepals wide-spreading, commonly ascending above flower; petals linear to lance-oblong, 4.9–13 mm, apex acute to obtuse; lip commonly yellow centrally, ovate to oblong, 4.9–12 × 3.3–7 mm, margins crenulate, glabrous; veins several, branches parallel; basal calli short-conic, mostly to 1 mm; viscidia linear-lanceolate; ovary 4–10 mm. Seeds monoembryonic. 2n = 30.
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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Variable, but often associated with calcareous soils: dry or wet prairie, also limestone glades (Missouri, South Dakota), interdunal soils (Michigan), riverbanks and floodplains (New Mexico, South Dakota).

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Dry to wet prairies and fens; 0--1900m.
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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 81 to >300

Comments: Extant populations of Spiranthes magnicamporum occur in: Alabama (36--3A-ranked, 1C, 1D; 10 counties) Arkansas (1D), Georgia (6), Illinois (43 counties), Iowa (6 records, but listed S3), Kansas (12), Kentucky (13--3A, 7B, 1C, 2D), Louisiana (1), Michigan (approximately 100 occurrences --ranked S3S4-- in 7 counties), Minnesota (25 records in 16 counties), Missouri (2 counties), Ohio (30--1A, 2B, 3C, 7D), South Dakota (10--1A, 1B, 1C, 3D), Wisconsin (14 counties), Ontario (approximately 50). (Ranks listed were assigned to EORs by individual states and all may not align with compiled RANKSPECS.)

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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering Aug--Nov.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Spiranthes magnicamporum

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N3 - Vulnerable

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N3 - Vulnerable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

Reasons: Widely distributed in the central United States, and into south eastern Canada, with disjuncts in the southwest and southeast United States. Favors dry grasslands with limestone bedrock near the surface. Locally frequent in Huron County, Michigan, but individuals are often scattered. There are greater than 100 occurrences across a large range.

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Global Short Term Trend: Relatively stable (=10% change)

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Threats

Comments: Threats include forest succession, soil disturbance or compaction, loss of habitat to agriculture, overgrazing.

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Management

Biological Research Needs: Effects of disturbance (fire, logging, grazing, soil compaction, mowing) on population vigor and abundance.

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Wikipedia

Spiranthes magnicamporum

Spiranthes magnicamporum, commonly called the Great Plains Ladies'-tresses, is a species of orchid that is native to North America. It is primarily native in the Great Plains, but there are outlying populations in the east in areas of former natural grassland, such as the Black Belt prairies of the Southeast. It is found in both fens and wet and dry prairies, often in calcareous soil.[1]

It is a perennial that produces a spiral of white flowers in the fall. It is closely related to the Spiranthes cernua complex, and it was not recognized as a separate species until the 1970s. S. magnicamporum can be distinguished by its much stronger scent, later flowering time, and lateral sepals that spread over the top of the flower. [2][3]

References[edit]

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Notes

Comments

Leaves typically senesce some weeks before anthesis, usually before the inflorescence appears. Occasionally at the northern and western range limits of the species, however, especially in wetter habitats, they may persist into anthesis. See notes on gene flow and apomixis under 14. Spiranthes cernua.
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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Spiranthes magnicamporum, by definition, is a stable diploid species within the S. cernua complex. The Spiranthes cernua complex is notorious for hybridization and, although ecologically isolated within their sympatric ranges, a hybrid race of S.magnicamporum and the sand prairie ecotype of S. cernua occurs in the Chicago region. (Catling, 1982)

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