Overview

Distribution

Fujian, Guangdong, Guangxi, Yunnan [Cambodia, India, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam].
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Plants (1--)1.5--3 m tall. Rhizomes procumbent above ground, clothed with brown, scalelike sheaths. Leaves sessile or subsessile; leaf sheath with netlike, depressed squares; ligule semiorbicular, 3--5 mm; leaf blade lanceolate to linear, 25--35 × 3--7 cm, glabrous, base subrounded, apex caudate. Spikes ellipsoid; peduncle 4--8 cm, scalelike sheaths brown or green, elliptic; bracts lanceolate, ca. 1.8 cm × 5 mm; bracteoles tubular, ca. 1 cm. Calyx white, ca. 1.7 cm, slightly pubescent, apex 3-toothed. Corolla tube ca. 1.8 cm; lobes white, obovate-oblong, 1.6--2 cm × 5--7 mm. Labellum white with yellow, purple-tinged midvein, 2 purple spots at base, and yellow apex, orbicular-spatulate, 1.6--2 cm wide, midvein convex, base contracted into claw, apex reflexed, 2-cleft. Filament 5--6 mm; anther ca. 6 mm; connective appendage 3-lobed, central lobe semiorbicular, ca. 3 × 4 mm, lateral ones auriculate. Ovary white pubescent. Capsule purple, green, or brownish when mature and fresh, brown when dry, ellipsoid, 1.5--2 × 1.2--2 cm, with branched or simple, soft spines. Seeds many angled, strongly aromatic. Fl. May--Jun, fr. Aug--Sep.
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Ecology

Habitat

Forests, cultivated in wet and shady places in sparse forests; 100--800 m.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Amomum villosum

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Amomum villosum

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 5
Specimens with Barcodes: 5
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Wikipedia

Amomum villosum

Amomum villosum () is a plant in the ginger family that is grown throughout Southeast Asia and in South China.[2] Similar to cardamom, the plant is cultivated for their fruits, which dry into pods when mature and contain strongly aromatic seeds.[3] The pods are used in Chinese cuisines to flavour soups and in Chinese herbology to treat stomach ache and dysentery.[3]

Due to the demand for the seeds and the ripe fruits of the plant and to curb slash-and-burn activities in their forests by local populations, cultivation of the A. villosum and co-plantings with rubber trees has been encouraged by the governments of Yunnan and Guangdong, China.[4] However, the extensive cultivation of A. villosum in the forest has resulted in the reduction of species diversity in the rainforest of Southwest China.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ IUCN 2012. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2012.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 23 November 2012.
  2. ^ "Amomum villosum", Encyclopedia of Life 
  3. ^ a b G. Li, A.J. Chen, X.Y. Chen, X.L. Li1 and W.W. Gao (2010), "First report of Amomum villosum (cardamom) leaf lesion caused by Pyricularia costina in China", New Disease Reports 22 (2.) 
  4. ^ Zhou, Shouqing (1993), "Cultivation of Amomum villosum in tropical forests", Forest Ecology and Management 60 (1–2): 157–162, doi:10.1016/0378-1127(93)90029-M 
  5. ^ Liu, Hongmao; Gao, Lei; Zheng, Zheng; Feng, Zhili (2006), "The impact of Amomum villosum cultivation on seasonal rainforest in Xishuangbanna, Southwest China", Biodiversity and Conservation 15 (9): 2971–2985, doi:10.1007/s10531-005-3876-4 


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