Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and Mexico (at least Sonora).

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Ariz., Calif., Nev., N.Mex., Tex.; Mexico (Baja California, Sonora).
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Culms to 90 cm × 2 mm, scabrous. Leaves: sheath fronts spotted red-brown, veinless, plane, apex truncate to convex, membranous; ligule rounded, to 1 mm, free limb to 0.2 mm; blades to 75 cm × 6 mm, shorter than flowering stem. Inflorescences loosely paniculate, 4–12 cm × 15–20 mm, with 10–20 branches proximal branches distinct; the proximal internode to 25 mm; bracts scalelike, not conspicuous, the awn, when present, 15–50 mm. Scales hyaline, red-brown or pale brown, margins colorless, broad, shining, apex acute or mucronate. Anthers with prominent apiculus to 0.5 mm. Perigynia dark brown-black, 3–5-veined abaxially, 0–3-veined adaxially, body ovate to lanceolate, 3–4.5 × 1.5–2 mm, base rounded to cordate, conspicuous basal spongy tissue somewhat distending perigynium; beak 1–1.5 mm. Achenes red-brown, ovate, 1.2–1.5 × 1–1.2 mm, glossy; style base cylindric.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Carex agrostoides Mackenzie; C. vitrea T. Holm
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Type Information

Isotype for Carex agrostoides Mack.
Catalog Number: US 617798
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): E. O. Wooton
Year Collected: 1908
Locality: Luna, NW of Mogollon Mountains., Socorro, New Mexico, United States, North America
Elevation (m): 1981 to 1981
  • Isotype: Mackenzie, K. K. 1907. Bull. Torrey Bot. Club. 34: 607.
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Isotype for Carex agrostoides Mack.
Catalog Number: US 694342
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): E. O. Wooton
Year Collected: 1900
Locality: Luna., Socorro, New Mexico, United States, North America
  • Isotype: Mackenzie, K. K. 1907. Bull. Torrey Bot. Club. 34: 607.
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Isotype for Carex vitrea Holm
Catalog Number: US 279151
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): S. B. Parish
Year Collected: 1896
Locality: Palm Springs, Agua Caliente, desert base near San Jacinto Mt., Riverside, California, United States, North America
Elevation (m): 152 to 213
  • Isotype: Holm, H. T. 1904. Amer. J. Sci. Arts ser. 4. 17: 302.
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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: 4000 to 5000 feet in Arizona.

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Stream banks, springs, seeps in desert regions; 600–2700m.
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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Fruiting Jul–Aug.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Carex alma

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Carex alma

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 3
Specimens with Barcodes: 5
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

Reasons: Carex agrostoides is in Arizona to western Texas and in Mexico (at least Sonora).

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Wikipedia

Carex alma

Carex alma is a species of sedge known by the common name sturdy sedge. It is native to the southwestern United States and northern Mexico, where it grows in moist spots in a number of habitat types. This sedge forms a thick clump of thin stems up to 90 centimeters in length and long, thready leaves. The leaves have basal sheaths with conspicuous red coloration, often spotting. The inflorescence is a dense to open cluster of many spikelets occurring both at the ends of stems and at nodes. Each cluster is up to 15 centimeters long and 1 to 2 wide. The plant is sometimes dioecious, with an individual sedge bearing either male or female flowers. The female, pistillate flowers have white or white-edged bracts. The male, staminate flowers have visible anthers 2 millimeters long or longer. The fruit is coated in a sac called a perigynium which is gold to dark brown in color and has a characteristic bit of spongy tissue at the base.

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Notes

Comments

Carex alma has an unusual combination of characteristics for the section. The conspicuous basal sheaths, the basally spongy perigynia tapering to beak, the hyaline acute scales, and the cylindricly enlarged style bases place the species closer to sect. Vulpinae than to other taxa of sect. Multiflorae. Carex agrostoides, here placed in synonymy with C. alma, has previously been distinguished by the green perigynia and absence of basal spongy tissue. All such specimens, including the type, appear to be immature specimens of C. alma in which spongy tissue and mature perigynium coloration have not developed.
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