Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: Carex emoryi occurs from Connecticut and New York west to Ontario, Manitoba, North Dakota, and Wyoming south to New Mexico, Chihuahua and Coahuila states in Mexico, Texas, Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia (Standley et al. 2002).

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Man., Ont.; Ark., Colo., Conn., Del., D.C., Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kans., Md., Mich., Minn., Mo., Nebr., N.J., N.Mex., N.Y., N.Dak., Ohio, Okla., Pa., S.Dak., Tex., Va., W.Va., Wis., Wyo.; Mexico (Chihuahua, Coahuila).
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Plants not cespitose. Culms acutely or obtusely angled, 30–115 cm, scabrous. Leaves: basal sheaths red-brown; sheaths of proximal leaves glabrous, fronts lacking spots and veins, apex convex, prolonged; blades 3–6 mm wide. Inflorescences: proximal bract equal to inflorescence, 3–5 mm wide. Spikes erect; proximal 3–5 spikes pistillate, 2.5–10 cm × 3–5 mm, base attenuate; terminal 2–3 spikes staminate. Pistillate scales pale or red-brown, equaling perigynia, apex acute, awnless. Perigynia ascending, green, spots absent, 3–5-veined on each face, somewhat flattened, loosely enclosing achenes, ellipsoid, 1.7–3.2 × 1–2.1 mm, dull, apex rounded or obtuse, papillose; beak 0.1–0.3 mm. Achenes not constricted, dull. 2n = 72.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Carex millegrana T. Holm; C. stricta Lamarck var. elongata (Boeckeler) Gleason; C. stricta var. emoryi (Dewey) L. H. Bailey; C. variabilis L. H. Bailey var. elatior L. H. Bailey; C. virginiana Woods var. elongata Boeckeler
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Type Information

Isotype for Carex millegrana Holm
Catalog Number: US 85954
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): E. J. Wallace
Year Collected: 1896
Locality: Rosebud Creek., South Dakota, United States, North America
  • Isotype: Holm, H. T. 1904. Amer. J. Sci. Arts ser. 4. 17: 311.
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Ecology

Habitat

Stream banks, ditches, seeps; 0–1200m.
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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: > 300

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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Fruiting May–Jun.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Carex emoryi

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Carex emoryi

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 5
Specimens with Barcodes: 11
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Environmental Specificity: Moderate. Generalist or community with some key requirements scarce.

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Wikipedia

Carex emoryi

Carex emoryi, the Riverbank tussock sedge or Emory's sedge, is a very attractive and functional native plant for stormwater applications. It thrives with alternating cycles of wet and dry, making it ideal for vegetated swales and infiltration basins. Native to much of the Mid-Atlantic and Midwest, C. emoryi was first separated from similar species of Carex by botanists in the early part of the 20th century. Bluish green shoots appear in late March in Zone 6, rapidly elongating to attractive, bright green foliage that reaches 24 to 30 inches by late May. An inconspicuous inflorescence appears in mid-May at the same height as the leaves.

The foliage remains upright and attractive throughout the growing season unless battered by severe storms or deep floodwater . if it is laid down by extreme weather, new shoots rapidly produce fresh foliage from the base of the plant. The foliage turns shades of yellow in October, fading to brown in November. it is generally crushed by the first significant snowfall. Riverbank tussock sedge is adaptable to a variety of soil and moisture conditions. As the common name implies, its natural habitat consists of the banks of rivers and streams. It also occurs on sand and gravel bars in streams. These habitats are invariable flooded during high water events, but become quite dry during periods of low water.

C. emoryi spreads rather aggressively by rhizomes. In good conditions, a 2 inch plug installed in early spring can be expected to form a 1-foot-diameter clump by the end of the first growing season. This habit makes it ideal for vegetated swale or streambank stabilization projects. Finally, C. emoryi may be utilized as a border along retention ponds, providing an attractive solution for erosion prevention and maintenance reduction along shorelines.

References [edit]

  • Tungesvick K., (2009, March). Field Notes: Carex emoryi. American Nurseryman,pg 78
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Notes

Comments

Carex emoryi resembles C. aquatilis in size and habit, and has similar sheaths and spike dimensions. It is distinguished by the finely veined perigynia, the prolonged convex sheath apex and truncate ligule, and the hypostomic leaves. Most specimens identified as C. aquatilis var. altior are C. aquatilis; the type of C. aquatilis var. altior is an immature specimen of C. emoryi. Although previously thought to be related to C. stricta, the differences in sheath characters and higher chromosome number suggest that C. emoryi is not a member of the C. stricta subgroup.
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