Overview

Distribution

Distribution in Egypt

 

Mediterranean region and western desert.

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Global Distribution

Western and northwest Europe, Mediterranean region, Sinai, Black Sea coasts, Sara Island in the Caspian Sea.

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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Carex extensa Gooden.:
Argentina (South America)
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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introduced; Md., N.Y., Va.; Eurasia; n Africa.
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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Culms 15–75 cm. Leaves: basal sheaths reddish; blades of flowering stems channeled or involute, glaucous to grayish green, shorter than to equaling stems, widest blades 1–3.5(–4.3) mm wide. Inflorescences: peduncle of terminal spike 0.2–1 cm; proximal bract 2–10 times as long as inflorescence; pistillate spikes 2–5, spreading to ascending, ovoid to ellipsoid; distal 2–3 spikes clustered, sessile; terminal staminate spike 5–30 × 2–4 mm. Pistillate scales reddish brown with green midribs, apex acute or apiculate. Staminate scales reddish brown with green midribs, margins scarious, apex obtuse to acuminate. Anthers 1.2–3 mm. Perigynia grayish green, with reddish brown speckles, 2.7–3.9 × 1.2–1.9 mm; beak 0.5–1.1 mm. 2n = 60.
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Ecology

Habitat

Salt marshes.

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Borders of brackish marshes, meadows, and swamps; 0–50m.
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Associations

Foodplant / parasite
pycnium of Aster tripolium parasitises live Carex extensa

Foodplant / saprobe
immersed pseudothecium of Didymella proximella is saprobic on dead leaf of Carex extensa
Remarks: season: 3-7

Foodplant / parasite
telium of Puccinia dioicae var. extensicola parasitises live Carex extensa

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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Fruiting Jun–Jul.
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Life Expectancy

Perennial.

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Carex extensa

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Carex extensa

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 10
Specimens with Barcodes: 12
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Wikipedia

Carex extensa

Carex extensa is a species of sedge known by the common name long-bracted sedge.[1]

References[edit source | edit]

  1. ^ Long-bracted sedge British wildflowers
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Notes

Comments

Carex extensa, native to Eurasia, is locally established along the coast from Long Island, New York, to Norfolk County, Virginia. It was first collected on Coney Island, New York in 1860, and it persists in Maryland and Virginia. Additional localities should be sought along that stretch of coast. 

 Chromosomes counts are not available from North American material; European materials are consistently counted as 2n = 60 (E. W. Davies 1956; W. Dietrich 1972; M. Queiros 1980).

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