Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Large palm tree. Stems erect, up to 20 m, with a distinct swelling above the middle. Leaves crowded on top of the stem, fan-shaped, blue-green up to 4 m including the petiole. Petiole armed with recurved thorns. Flowers in large branched sprays, unisexual on separate trees, female flowers larger than male. Fruit large, 12-18 cm in diameter, subspherical, orange-brown.
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Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Derivation of specific name

aethiopum: Ethiopia, the name of the sub-Saharan biological region before the country formerly known as Abyssinia claimed the name Ethiopia.
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Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Distribution

Worldwide distribution

Sudanian, Zambezian and Coastal phytochoria, extending to northern South Africa.
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Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Ecology

Population Biology

Frequency

Very rare in Zimbabwe
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Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Borassus aethiopium

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Borassus aethiopium

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 2
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data: Borassus aethiopum

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Borassus aethiopum

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 5
Specimens with Barcodes: 5
Species With Barcodes: 1
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Borassus aethiopum

Borassus aethiopum is a species of Borassus palm from Africa. In English it is variously referred to as African fan palm, African palmyra palm, deleb palm, ron palm, toddy palm, black rhun palm, ronier palm (from the French) and other names. It is widespread across much of tropical and southern Africa from Senegal to Ethiopia to Zimbabwe, and also grows in Madagascar and the Comoros.[1][2]

Description[edit]

Borassus aethiopum grows swelling, solitary trunks to 25 metres (82 ft) in height and 1 metre (3 ft 3 in) in diameter at the base. The green leaves — 3 metres (9.8 ft) wide — are carried on petioles — 2 metres (6 ft 7 in) long — which are armed with spines. The crownshaft is spherical to 7 metres (23 ft) wide, the leaves are round with stiff leaflets, segmented a third or half-way to the petiole. In male plants the flower is small and inconspicuous; females grow larger, 2 centimetres (0.79 in) flowers which produce yellow to brown fruit resembling the coconut containing up to 3 seeds.[3]

Uses[edit]

The tree has many uses: the fruit are edible, as are the tender roots produced by the young plant;[4] fibres can be obtained from the leaves; and the wood (which is reputed to be termite-proof) can be used in construction.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kew World Checklist of Selected Plant Families, Borassus aethiopum
  2. ^ AFPD. 2008. African Flowering Plants Database - Base de Donnees des Plantes a Fleurs D'Afrique.
  3. ^ Martius, Carl Friedrich Philipp von. 1838. Historia Naturalis Palmarum 3(7): 220–221, Borassus aethiopum
  4. ^  "Deleb palm". Collier's New Encyclopedia. 1921. 
  5. ^ Bailey, L.H. & E.Z. Bailey. 1976. Hortus Third i–xiv, 1–1290. MacMillan, New York.
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