Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Herbs, perennial, unbranched to usually sparsely branched. Roots tuberous. Stems erect to ascending. Leaves: blade linear to linear-lanceolate, 4--15 ´ 0.4--1 cm, apex acuminate, glabrous to puberulent. Inflorescences: distal cyme usually 1-flowered, exserted; spathes solitary, green, often suffused and/or striped with purple, pedunculate, falcate or not, 2.5--8 ´ 0.7--1.7 cm, margins distinct, scabrous, not ciliate, apex acuminate, glabrous to puberulent; peduncles 1.5--9.5 cm. Flowers bisexual and staminate; pedicels puberulent; petals dark blue, proximal petal somewhat smaller; staminodes 3; antherodes yellow, cruciform. Capsules 3-locular, 2-valved, 5--6 mm, apiculate. Seeds 5, brown, 2.2--2.7 ´ 1.7--2.2 mm, rugose, pitted.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat & Distribution

Flowering summer--fall. Rocky soils; Ariz., Colo., N.Mex., Tex.; Mexico.
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Wikipedia

Commelina dianthifolia

Commelina dianthifolia, known as the birdbill dayflower, is a perennial herb native to Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Texas, and northern Mexico.[1] Petals are blue while sepals are green. The inflorescence is a scorpioid cyme and it is subtended by a boat-like spathe.

Uses[edit]

An infusion of plant used by Keres people as a strengthener for weakened tuberculosis patients.[2] The Ramah Navajo give a cold simple or compound infusion to livestock as an aphrodisiac.[3]


References[edit]

  1. ^ Commelina dianthifolia Delile - PLANTS Profile. USDA Retrieved 25 January 2011.
  2. ^ Swank, George R. 1932 The Ethnobotany of the Acoma and Laguna Indians. University of New Mexico, M.A. Thesis (p. 38)
  3. ^ Vestal, Paul A. 1952 The Ethnobotany of the Ramah Navaho. Papers of the Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology 40(4):1-94 (p. 19)
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Notes

Comments

Two varieties have been recognized: Commelina dianthifolia var. dianthifolia (Arizona, New Mexico, Texas), with the spathes gradually tapering into a long, acuminate apex, and C. dianthifolia var. longispatha (Torrey) Brashier (Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico), with the spathes abruptly narrowed below the middle into a long, attentuate tip (C. K. Brashier 1966). Although most U.S. specimens are readily separable into these taxa, their ranges and ecologies overlap very broadly in Arizona and New Mexico. Until their variation in Mexico is studied, I can see no useful purpose in maintaining these varieties.
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