Overview

Comprehensive Description

Derivation of specific name

grandiflorum: with large flowers
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Distribution

Distribution: subtropical NW. Himalaya, 500-1500 m.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Shrub large, sometimes scandent; branches striate, glabrous, green. Leaves opposite, 5-12 cm long, petiolate, petiole and midrib margined; leaflets (5-) 7-11, glabrous, dark green, the upper pair with a broad flat base, often confluent with the terminal leaflet; the terminal hardly larger, ovate lanceolate, acuminate. Flowers fragrant, in lax axillary or terminal cymes, the stalks of later flowers exceeding the first or central ones; pedicels up to 3 cm long. Bracts linear, 5 mm long. Calyx teeth 5, linear, 7-12 mm long. Corolla white, sometimes tinged with red outside, tube c. 2 cm long, lobes 5, oblong, shorter than the tube, involute at the margins.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Description

Shrubs scandent, 2-4 m. Branchlets terete, angular or grooved. Leaves opposite, pinnatipartite or compound with 5-9 leaflets; petiole 0.5-4 cm; leaflet blade ovate or narrowly so (terminal one usually narrowly rhomboid), 0.7-3.8 × 0.5-1.5 cm, base cuneate or blunt, apex acute, acuminate, or blunt, sometimes mucronate. Cymes terminal or axillary, 2-9-flowered; bracts linear, 2-3 mm. Pedicel 0.5-2.5 cm, middle pedicel of cymes conspicuously shorter. Calyx glabrous; lobes subulate-linear, (3-)5-10 mm. Corolla white, salverform; tube 1.3-2.5 cm; lobes often 5, oblong, 1.3-2.2 cm. Fruit not seen. Fl. Aug-Oct. 2n = 26*.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Jasminum officinale Linnaeus var. grandiflorum (Linnaeus) Stokes; J. officinale f. grandiflorum (Linnaeus) Kobuski.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat & Distribution

Widely grown in Sichuan, Yunnan [native of Arabia]
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flower/Fruit

Fl. Per.: Warm season, sometimes the whole year.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Jasminum grandiflorum

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Notes

Comments

Wild in Salt Range and Rawalpindi Hills (according to Parker), Karot forest. Frequently cultivated. The leaves and flowers have long been known in indigenous medicine; the leaves are adstringent in action. The whole plant is considered to be anthelmintic and diuretic. The perfume from the flowers is highly priced. National Flower of Pakistan.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Comments

Cultivated in warm and tropical countries for its fragrant flowers.
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Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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