Overview

Distribution

Hebei, Heilongjiang, Henan, Hubei, Jiangsu, Jilin, Liaoning, Nei Mongol, Shaanxi, Shandong, Shanxi, Xinjiang, Zhejiang [Korea].
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Trees deciduous, to 6 m tall, with thorns 1–2 cm or sometimes unarmed. Branchlets purplish brown when young, grayish brown when old, terete, subglabrous or glabrous when young; buds purplish red, triangular-ovoid, glabrous. Stipules falcate, ca. 8 mm, herbaceous, margin serrate, apex acuminate; petiole 2–6 cm, glabrous; leaf blade dark green adaxially, broadly ovate or triangular-ovate, rarely rhomboidal-ovate, 5–10 × 4–7.5 cm, lateral veins 6–10 pairs, usually extending to apices of lobes and to sinuses between lobes, abaxially sparsely pubescent along veins, adaxially lustrous, base truncate or broadly cuneate, with 3–5 pairs of lobes, margin sharply irregularly doubly serrate, apex shortly acuminate. Corymb 4–6 cm in diam., many flowered; peduncle initially pubescent, glabrate, bracts caducous, linear-lanceolate, membranous, apex acuminate. Pedicel 4–7 mm, initially pubescent, glabrescent. Flowers ca. 1.5 cm in diam. Hypanthium campanulate, abaxially grayish white pubescent. Sepals triangular-ovate to lanceolate, 4–5 mm, both surfaces glabrous, apex shortly acuminate. Petals white, obovate or suborbicular, 7–8 × 5–6 mm. Stamens 20. Ovary 5-loculed, with 2 ovules per locule; styles 3–5, pubescent basally. Pome dark red, subglobose or pyriform, 1–2.5 cm in diam., glabrous; sepals persistent; pyrenes 3–5. Fl. May–Jun, fr. Aug–Sep. 2n = 34*, 102*.
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Ecology

Habitat

Among shrubs, slopes, also cultivated; 100--2000 m.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Crataegus pinnatifida

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 18
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Wikipedia

Crataegus pinnatifida

Crataegus pinnatifida, also known as Chinese hawthorn, Chinese hawberry,[2][3] or shānzhā,da hong guo (Chinese: 山楂/山查 or 山楂果/山查果, 大红果 literally means "mountain hawthorn" or "mountain hawberry"), refers to a small to a medium-sized tree as well as the fruit of the tree. The fruit is bright red, 1.5 inches in diameter.

Use[edit]

Culinary use[edit]

In northern Chinese cuisine, ripe Crataegus pinnatifida fruits are used in the desserts tanghulu, shanzhagao. It is also used to make the traditional candies haw flakes, haw rolls, as well as candied fruit slices, jam, jelly and wine.

Traditional medicine[edit]

Several species of hawthorn are used in naturopathic medicine and traditional Chinese medicine, primarily to strengthen cardiac output. The dried fruits of Crataegus pinnatifida (called shān zhā (traditional Chinese: 山楂, simplified Chinese: 山楂)) are used primarily as a digestive aid.[4]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Phipps, J.B.; Robertson, K.R.; Smith, P.G.; Rohrer, J.R. (1990). A checklist of the subfamily Maloideae (Rosaceae). Canadian Journal of Botany. 68(10): 2209–2269.
  2. ^ Hummer, K.E.; Janick, J. (2008). Folta, Kevin M.; Gardiner, Susan E., ed. Genetics and genomics of Rosaceae. New York: Springer. p. 11. ISBN 978-0-387-77490-9. 
  3. ^ Flint, Harrison L. (1997). Landscape plants for eastern North America : esclusive of Florida and the immediate Gulf Coast. New York: John Wiley & Sons. p. 158. ISBN 978-0-471-59919-7. 
  4. ^ Dharmananda S. (2004). Hawthorn (Crataegus). Food and Medicine in China.. January. Institute of Traditional Medicine Online. 

See also[edit]

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