Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: Occurs in Ontario and in the United States from Maine to Minnesota south to New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and northern Indiana (Kartesz 1999).

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Ont.; Conn., Del., Ind., Maine, Mass., Mich., N.H., N.Y., Pa., R.I., Tenn., Vt., Va., Wis.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Rhizomes present. Cauline stems compressed, without spots, 10--25 cm; glands absent. Turions absent. Leaves both submersed and floating or floating absent, ± spirally arranged. Submersed leaves sessile, lax; stipules persistent to deliquescent, inconspicuous, convolute, adnate to blade for less than ½ stipule length, light green, ligulate, 0.2--1.2 cm, not fibrous, not shredding at tip, apex obtuse; blade light green to rarely brown, linear-setaceous, not arcuate, 1.5--11 cm ´ 0.1--0.4(--0.6) mm, base slightly tapering, without basal lobes, not clasping, margins entire, not crispate, apex not hoodlike, tapering, lacunae absent; veins 1. Floating leaves petiolate; petioles continuous in color to apex, 5--35 mm; blade adaxially light green, lanceolate-elliptic to broadly elliptic, 0.6--2.3(--2.8) cm ´ 1--11 mm, base tapering or rounded, apex acute to long tapering; veins 3--7. Inflorescences unbranched; peduncles dimorphic, submersed axillary, somewhat recurved, clavate, 1--10 mm, emersed axillary or terminal, erect to slightly recurved, slightly clavate, 3.5--22 mm; spikes dimorphic, submersed , globular to ellipsoid, 1.5--7 mm, emersed ellipsoid to cylindric, 3--14 mm. Fruits sessile, greenish brown, somewhat orbicular, compressed, abaxially keeled, laterally keeled, 1.1--2.1 ´ 1.1--2 mm, lateral keel without points; beak absent; sides without basal tubercles; embryo with more than 1 full spiral.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Potamogeton diversifolius Rafinesque var. trichophyllus Morong
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Ecology

Habitat

Acidic waters of ponds, lakes, and streams; 0--300m.
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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering early summer--fall.
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N3 - Vulnerable

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

Reasons: Potamogeton bicupulatus is found in the northeastern United States and in the Great Lakes region. It is abundant in acid waters along the New England coastal plain but becomes rare inland (Voss 1972, Hellquist and Crow 1980, Rhoads and Block 2000). Reports of P. bicupulatus across the southeastern United States have been determined to be false (Kartesz 1999).

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Notes

Comments

Potamogeton bicupulatus is an uncommon species of the acid lakes and streams of northeastern United States and southern Canada. It is the final third species we have with dimorphic inflorescences and embryos with more than one full spiral. It can be separated from the other two, Potamogeton spirillus and P. diversifolius, because it has very narrow submersed leaves without lacunae and fruits with lateral keels without sharp points.
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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: The name Potamogeton capillaceus was misapplied to P. bicupulatus by Fernald (1950). P. capillaceus is now considered to be included in the synonomy of P. diversifolius (Hellequist and Crow 1980, Gleason and Cronquist 1991, Kartesz 1999).

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