Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Herb 50-150 cm high, from a rhizome; stems 4-angled. Stipular sheaths 10-20 mm, convolute, early deciduous. Leaves 30-90 × 8-15 mm, linear-lanceolate, sessile, all submerged, shining, translucent; apex obtuse, apiculate; margin finely serrate, markedly undulate when mature. Spikes 5-10-flowered, somewhat lax. Drupe 2-4 mm, ovoid-acuminate, laterally flattened; beak nearly as long as fruit, falcate, tapered.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Derivation of specific name

crispus: with a wavy or curled margin
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Description

This is a submerged aquatic plant, producing leafy stems up to 3¼' long. The stems are light green or yellowish white, glabrous, and somewhat flattened (typically about 2 mm. across). Alternate leaves of fairly uniform size occur throughout the length of these stems. The leaf blades are 1½-3" (4-7.5 cm.) long, ¼-½" (6-12 mm.) across, and sessile; they are narrowly oblong to oblong in shape, while their margins are finely serrated and vertically undulate (wavy up-and-down). Leaf tips are typically rounded and blunt (obtuse), while leaf bases are more wedge-shaped (cuneate). The leaf blades are olive-green, reddish green, or brownish green in color and glabrous; their texture is stiff, rather than soft. Individual leaf blades have prominent central veins and 1-2 pairs of parallel lateral veins are sometimes visible. At the bases of leaf blades, lanceolate to ovate sheaths up to 1 cm. (1/3") long are produced; these sheaths are brownish green, glabrous, and early-deciduous. While all stems and leaves are typically submerged, the upper leaves toward the tips of stems are often within a few centimeters of the water surface. Upper stems occasionally terminate in short cylindrical spikes of flowers about ½-1" (12-24 mm.) in length. Less often, such spikes of flowers are produced from the axils of upper leaves. Their naked peduncles are ¾-3½" long; they hold the floral spikes slightly above the water surface. Individual flowers are quite small (about 1/8" or 3 mm. across), consisting of 4 greenish brown or greenish red sepals (or sepaloid connectives), 4 anthers, and 4 ovules. The blooming period usually occurs from late spring to early summer for about 1-2 weeks, although some plants may bloom later. The flowers are cross-pollinated by wind or water. Afterwards, the flowers are replaced by flattened achenes about 4-6 mm. in length that have long beaks (up to 4 achenes per flower). In addition to the achenes, this plant also produces winter buds (turions) from the tips of stems and the axils of leaves. These winter buds resemble congested rosettes of holly-like leaves spanning about 2 cm. across at maturity; they have a bur-like or cone-like appearance and stiff texture. After the achenes and winter buds are produced and released, the entire plant withers away during the summer. The winter buds drift in the water and eventually sink to the bottom of the body of water, where they can take root during the autumn, forming new plants that can survive the winter. The root system is fibrous.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Potamogeton crispus L., 1753

Materials

Type status: Other material. Occurrence: recordedBy: Y. Ito ; Location: country: Thailand ; locality: Sagaing Division; Kalewa-Kalemyo ; verbatimLatitude: 23° 12' 17" N; verbatimLongitude: 94° 11' 33" E; Event: eventDate: Mar. 25, 1938 ; Record Level: collectionID: F. G. Dickason 7196; institutionCode: GH

Type status: Other material. Occurrence: recordedBy: Y. Ito ; Location: country: Myanmar ; locality: Sagaing Division; Kalewa-Kalemyo, shallow water, Alt. 600 ft. ; verbatimLatitude: 23° 12' 17" N; verbatimLongitude: 94° 11' 33" E; Event: eventDate: Mar. 26, 1938 ; Record Level: collectionID: F. G. Dickason 7204; institutionCode: GH

Distribution

Bangladesh, Bhutan, China (nationwide), India (nationwide), Japan, Korea, Laos, Malesia (Sumatra), Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Vietnam; Worldwide.

  • Ito, Yu, Barfod, Anders S. (2014): An updated checklist of aquatic plants of Myanmar and Thailand. Biodiversity Data Journal 2, 1019: 1019-1019, URL:http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/BDJ.2.e1019
Public Domain

Plazi

Source: Plazi.org

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Brief

"Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1 Year Assessed: 2010 Assessor/s: Gupta, A.K. Reviewer/s: Juffe Bignoli, D., Zhuang, X. & Homsombath, K. Justification: This is a widespread species which faces no major threat. It is listed as Least Concern. Conservation Actions: No conservation measures are in place."
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Description

General: Pondweed family (Potamogetonaceae). Curly pondweed is an introduced, fast growing perennial. The stems are flattened and somewhat branching, forty to eighty centimeters long and mostly one to two millimeters wide (Guard 1995). The leaves are simple, long, narrow and attached directly to the stem. The flowers are brownish and inconspicuous and usually occur from May to October.

Distribution: Curly pondweed has been introduced from Massachusetts to Minnesota, south to Virginia and Missouri (Tiner 1987). For current distribution, please consult the Plant profile page for this species on the PLANTS Web site.

Public Domain

USDA NRCS National Plant Data Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution

Worldwide distribution

North Africa, Sudan, Ethiopia, Botswana, Malawi, Mozambique, Zambia, Zimbabwe and South Africa. Also in Europe, Asia and Australia. Introduced from Canada to Argentina and in New Zealand.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Range and Habitat in Illinois

Curly Pondweed is occasional to locally common throughout Illinois, where it is not native. It was introduced into North America from Eurasia during the 19th century, possibly as an aquarium plant. Habitats consist of ponds, sheltered areas of lakes, slow-moving rivers, spring-fed sloughs, and drainage canals. This plant has spread to new areas by means of discarded water from aquariums, fish-stocking operations, by clinging to the propellers and trailers of motorboats, and by drifting downstream. It is often found in degraded wetlands that are exposed to either urban development or recreational activity in park areas. At some locations, it can become dominant, displacing other aquatic plants, by forming dense colonies.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Range Description

This species is native throughout most of the old world, from Europe to Japan and the Korean Peninsula, the Middle East, Indian subcontinent, China and northern southeast Asia with discontinuous populations in Sumatra (Indonesia) and Australia. It also occurs throughout the Mediterranean including North Africa and through the Black Sea region to the Caucasus. Found throughout most of sub-Saharan Africa.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

"Range Description: This species is native throughout most of the old world, from Europe to Japan and the Korean Peninsula, the Middle East, Indian subcontinent, China and northern southeast Asia with discontinuous populations in Sumatra (Indonesia) and Australia. It also occurs throughout the Mediterranean including North Africa and through the Black Sea region to the Caucasus. Found throughout most of sub-Saharan Africa. Countries - Native: Afghanistan; Albania; Algeria; Austria; Belgium; Bhutan; Botswana; Bulgaria; China; Czech Republic; Denmark; Egypt; Estonia; Ethiopia; Finland; France; Germany; Hungary; India; Indonesia (Sumatera); Iran, Islamic Republic of; Iraq; Ireland; Israel; Italy; Japan (Hokkaido, Honshu, Kyushu, Shikoku); Jordan; Kazakhstan; Korea, Democratic People's Republic of; Korea, Republic of; Lao People's Democratic Republic; Latvia; Lebanon; Lithuania; Malawi; Mozambique; Myanmar (Myanmar (mainland)); Nepal; Netherlands; Norway; Pakistan; Poland; Portugal; Romania; Russian Federation (Altay, Dagestan, Primorye, West Siberia); South Africa (Eastern Cape Province, Free State, Northern Cape Province, North-West Province, Western Cape Province); Spain; Sri Lanka; Sudan; Swaziland; Sweden; Switzerland; Syrian Arab Republic; Tajikistan; Thailand; Turkey; Ukraine; United Kingdom; Uzbekistan; Viet Nam; Zambia; Zimbabwe"
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution in Egypt

Nile region, Oases, Mediterranean region, Egyptian desert and Sinai.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Bibliotheca Alexandrina

Source: Bibliotheca Alexandrina - EOL Ar

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Global Distribution

Temperate Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia, North America.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Bibliotheca Alexandrina

Source: Bibliotheca Alexandrina - EOL Ar

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

introduced; Alta., B.C., Ont., Que., Sask.; Ala., Ariz., Ark., Calif., Conn., Del., D.C., D.C., Fla., Ga., Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kans., Ky., La., Maine, Md., Mass., Mich., Minn., Mo., Nebr., Nev., N.H., N.J., N.Y., N.C., Ohio, Okla., Oreg., Pa., R.I., S.Dak., Tenn., Tex., Utah, Vt., Va., Wash., W.Va., Wis., Wyo.; Central America (Costa Rica); South America (Colombia, and Argentina); Eurasia; Australia.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution: Europe, Asia, Africa and Australia.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Europe, Africa, Asia and Australia.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Adaptation

This species has invasive qualities. Curly pondweed is commonly found in ponds, lakes, canals, pools and slow moving water of rivers and streams. This plant grows well in sandy, loamy and clay soils. It prefers acid, neutral and basic soil and can grow in very alkaline and saline soils. This species is not shade tolerant.

Public Domain

USDA NRCS National Plant Data Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Perennial, rhizomatous aquatic. Leaves submerged, sessile, broadly linear to oblong, undulate, translucent, serrate, 3-5-veined, usually obtuse, rarely acute 4-8 mm broad. Stipules free, 2-10 mm long, Spikes 5-8 cm long, ovoid-oblong, lax. Fruitlets 4-5 mm long, 2.5-3 mm broad, ovoid, beaked; beak long, decurrent.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Elevation Range

600-2000 m
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Description

Rhizomes absent. Cauline stems flattened, without spots, to 100 cm; nodal glands absent. Turions common, axillary or terminal, 1.5--3 ´ ca. 2 cm, hard; leaves ± 2-ranked; outer leaves 1--4 per side, base not corrugate, apex rounded; inner leaves rolled into linear, terete structure, oriented parallel to outer leaves. Leaves submersed, ± spirally arranged, sessile, lax; stipules persistent to deliquescent, inconspicuous, convolute, free from blade, brownish, not ligulate, to 0.5 cm, not fibrous, not shredding at tip, apex obtuse; blade light to dark green, linear, not arcuate, 1.2--9 cm ´ 4--10 mm, base obtuse to rounded, without basal lobes, not clasping to nearly clasping, margins conspicuously serrate, not crispate, apex not hoodlike, round to round-acute, lacunae in 2--5 rows each side of midrib; veins 3--5. Inflorescences unbranched, emersed; peduncles not dimorphic, terminal or rarely axillary, erect to ascending, cylindric, 2.5--4 cm; spikes not dimorphic, cylindric, 10--15 mm. Fruits sessile, red to reddish brown, obovoid, turgid to slightly concave, not abaxially or laterally keeled, 6 ´ 2.5 mm; beak apically recurved, 2--3 mm; sides without basal tubercles; embryo with 1 full spiral. 2n = 52 (Europe).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Range and Habitat in Illinois

Curly Pondweed is occasional to locally common throughout Illinois, where it is not native. It was introduced into North America from Eurasia during the 19th century, possibly as an aquarium plant. Habitats consist of ponds, sheltered areas of lakes, slow-moving rivers, spring-fed sloughs, and drainage canals. This plant has spread to new areas by means of discarded water from aquariums, fish-stocking operations, by clinging to the propellers and trailers of motorboats, and by drifting downstream. It is often found in degraded wetlands that are exposed to either urban development or recreational activity in park areas. At some locations, it can become dominant, displacing other aquatic plants, by forming dense colonies.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This aquatic plant grows in fresh and slightly brackish waters. It occurs in ponds, lakes, rivers and paddy fields.


Systems
  • Freshwater
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

General Habitat

"Habitat and Ecology: This aquatic plant grows in fresh and slightly brackish waters. It occurs in ponds, lakes, rivers and paddy fields. Systems: Freshwater List of Habitats: 5, 5.1, 5.4, 5.5, 5.7"
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Quiet waters, especially brackish, alkaline, or eutrophic waters of ponds, lakes, and streams; 0--2000m.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Dispersal

Establishment

Propagation by Seed: Curly pondweed seeds should be sown as soon as they are ripe, in summer or early autumn (Heuser 1997). The seeds lose viability quickly if they are allowed to dry out (Ibid). Prick out the seedlings when they are large enough to handle and increase the depth of water around the pot until the plants are covered by a few centimeters of water. Grow the plants in a sunny position in the greenhouse for their first winter, increasing the depth of water, as the plants grow larger. Plant them out into their permanent positions in early summer.

Public Domain

USDA NRCS National Plant Data Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Associations

Faunal Associations

Little is known about floral-faunal relationships for Curly Pondweed in North America, although it is probably similar to other submerged pondweeds (Potamogeton spp.). For example, such insects as the larvae of some aquatic beetles (Neohaemonia spp., Donacia spp.), the larvae of some shore flies (Hydrellia spp.), and the larvae of some caddisflies (Leptoceridae) probably feed on the submerged foliage of Curly Pondweed. The larvae of an introduced European moth, Acentropus niveus, feed on the foliage of Curly Pondweed, but they also feed on the foliage of many other aquatic plants. In addition, the larvae of some midges (Chironomidae) may bore into parts of the foliage, where they usually function as filter-feeders of micro-organisms. In general, both the seedheads and foliage of pondweeds are an important source of food to many kinds waterfowl and other wetland birds (Martin et al. 1951/1961). However, the stiff texture of the foliage of Curly Pondweed may decrease its food value to such wildlife somewhat. There is some evidence that the Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio) feeds on this plant, but not enough to function as an effective bio-control agent.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering spring--summer.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Potamogeton crispus

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Potamogeton crispus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 8
Specimens with Barcodes: 25
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2011

Assessor/s
Gupta, A.K.

Reviewer/s
Juffe Bignoli, D., Zhuang, X. & Homsombath, K.

Contributor/s

Justification

This is a widespread species which faces no major threat. It is listed as Least Concern.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

"Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1 Year Assessed: 2010 Assessor/s: Gupta, A.K. Reviewer/s: Juffe Bignoli, D., Zhuang, X. & Homsombath, K. Justification: This is a widespread species which faces no major threat. It is listed as Least Concern. Conservation Actions: No conservation measures are in place."
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Status

Introduced into the U.S. Considered a pest by several sources. Please consult the PLANTS Plant Profile for this species and your State Department of Natural Resources for this plant’s current status, such as, state noxious status and wetland indicator values.

Public Domain

USDA NRCS National Plant Data Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Population

Population
Although it is a common and widespread species there is no specific data on population numbers.

Population Trend
Stable
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Population: Although it is a common and widespread species there is no specific data on population numbers. Population Trend: Stable
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Threats

Major Threats
No threats have been identified.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Major Threat (s): No threats have been identified.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
No conservation measures are in place.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Cultivars, improved and selected materials (and area of origin)

Materials are available from wetland plant vendors. Contact your local Natural Resources Conservation Service (formerly Soil Conservation Service) office for more information. Look in the phone book under ”United States Government.” The Natural Resources Conservation Service will be listed under the subheading “Department of Agriculture.”

Public Domain

USDA NRCS National Plant Data Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Curly pondweed is an aquatic plant that can be used as an oxygenator of ponds. This species sometimes becomes a pest in waterways, lakes and reservoirs (Guard 1995). It is a fast growing plant in need of constant checking to make sure it does not overrun ponds, pools or canals.

Public Domain

USDA NRCS National Plant Data Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Cultivation

This aquatic plant prefers to grow in sunny locations where the water is 1-10' deep, clear to slightly turbid, and relatively stagnant to slow-moving. In addition, calcareous water that is relatively high in nutrients is preferred (pH 6.5-8.5). Substrates that are soft and muddy from decomposing organic matter are preferred, although sandy substrates and hard substrates are tolerated. This aquatic plant also tolerates water pollution to a greater extent than most pondweeds (Potamogeton spp.). Reproduction occurs primarily by means of winter buds (turions). Seeds quickly lose their vitality if they are allowed to dry out. In many areas of North America, Curly Pondweed is invasive, forming large dense colonies that can displace native aquatic plants. In these areas, it should not be cultivated. When large colonies of this plant die-off during the summer, this can cause excessive growth of filamentous algae and low levels of oxygen in the water as a result of the release of surplus nutrients.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Uses

Wildlife: Curly pondweed tends to increase oxygen levels and produce substantial organic material in aquatic environments (Guard 1995). This pondweed shelters small fish and aquatic insects that provide food for larger fish and amphibians (Ibid.).

Public Domain

USDA NRCS National Plant Data Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Notes

Comments

No specimens have been seen from New Brunswick, but the species is to be expected there. 

 Potamogeton crispus, an introduced species, has spread throughout much of North America. The expansion of this species’s range from its original collection in North America, apparently about 1840, has been discussed (R. L. Stuckey 1979). This is the only species of pondweeds in North America with serrate leaves and consequently it is easily recognized.

Life history of Potamogeton crispus is unusual as it flowers and fruits in late spring and early summer, at which time it also produces turions. The plants decay shortly after those structures develop, leaving only fruits and turions, which survive the summer. No one has observed any seed germination, but the turions (referred to as dormant apices) germinate in late summer or fall, and the plants overwinter as small plants only a few cm centimeters in size, even under the ice in northern climates (R. L. Stuckey et al. 1978). Growth then continues as the water begins warming in the spring. 

 One hybrid, Potamogeton crispus ´ P. praelongus (= P. ´ undulatus Wolfgang ex Schultes & Schultes f.), has been described.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!