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Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Global Distribution

Cultivated in the Old World tropics, also arising spontaneously wherever the parents grow together.

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Annual. Culms 1–2.5 m tall, 3–6 mm in diam. Leaf sheaths glabrous or pilose at mouth and base; leaf blades linear or linear-lanceolate; 15–30 × 1–3 cm, glabrous; ligule brown. Panicle lax, 15–30 × 6–12 cm; branches slender, branched; racemes usually tardily fragile at maturity, composed of 2–5 spikelet pairs. Sessile spikelet elliptic, 6–7.5 mm; callus hairy; lower glume leathery, thinner upward, thinly strigillose, distinctly 11–13-veined; upper lemma ovate or ovate-elliptic, apex 2-lobed, awned; awn 10–16 mm. Pedicelled spikelet male or barren, linear-lanceolate, persistent. Caryopsis elliptic or obovate-elliptic, 3.5–4.5 mm, enclosed within glumes. Fl. and fr. Jul–Sep. 2n = 20.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Andropogon sorghum subsp. sudanensis Piper, Proc. Biol. Soc. Washington 28(4): 33. 1915; A. sudanensis (Piper) Leppan & Bosman; Sorghum vulgare Persoon var. sudanense (Piper) Hitchcock.
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Type Information

Isotype for Andropogon sorghum var. sudanensis Piper
Catalog Number: US 3169664
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): W. Davie
Year Collected: 1912
Locality: Khartum., Egypt, Africa
  • Isotype: Piper, C. V. 1915. Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash. 28: 33.
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Holotype for Andropogon sorghum var. sudanensis Piper
Catalog Number: US 75608
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): C. V. Piper
Year Collected: 1912
Locality: Sudan, Africa
  • Holotype: Piper, C. V. 1915. Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash. 28: 33.
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Isotype for Andropogon sorghum var. sudanensis Piper
Catalog Number: US 82010
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): C. V. Piper
Year Collected: 1912
Locality: Sudan, Africa
  • Isotype: Piper, C. V. 1915. Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash. 28: 33.
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Ecology

Habitat

Cultivated for fodder (Sudan Grass).

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Habitat & Distribution

Naturalized. Anhui, Beijing, Fujian, Guizhou, Heilongjiang, Henan, Nei Mongol, Ningxia, Shaanxi, Xinjiang, Zhejiang [native to Africa; now widely cultivated for forage].
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Sorghum x drummondii

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: TNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Notes

Comments

This taxon is a cultivated selection (Sudan Grass) from Sorghum drummondii (Steudel) Millspaugh & Chase. It originated in Africa, but is widely grown for forage and is now naturalized in China. Sorghum drummondii is a general name given to the wide variety of weedy forms that have arisen in Africa by hybridization between the cereal S. bicolor and its wild progenitor S. arundinaceum (Desvaux) Stapf.
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