Overview

Distribution

Distribution: Pakistan (Sind, Punjab & N.W.F.P.); North and Northwest India; ? Afghanistan.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Physical Description

Perennials, Terrestrial, not aquatic, Stems nodes swollen or brittle, Stems erect or ascending, Stems caespitose, tufted, or clustered, Stems terete, round in cross section, or polygonal, Stem nodes bearded or hairy, Stem internodes solid or spongy, Stems with inflorescence 2-6 m tall, Stems, culms, or scapes exceeding basal leaves, Leaves mostly cauline, Leaves conspicuously 2-ranked, distichous, Leaves sheathing at base, Leaf sheath mostly open, or loo se, Leaf sheath smooth, glabrous, Leaf sheath and blade differentiated, Leaf blades linear, Leaf blades 2-10 mm wide, Leaf blades 1-2 cm wide, Leaf blades 2 or more cm wide, Leaf blades mostly flat, Leaf blades mostly glabrous, Leaf blades scabrous, roughened, or wrinkled, Leaf blades glaucous, blue-green, or grey, or with white glands, Ligule present, Ligule a fringed, ciliate, or lobed membrane, Inflorescence terminal, Inflorescence an open panicle, openly paniculate, branches spreading, Inflorescence a dense slender spike-like panicle or raceme, branches contracted, Inflorescence solitary, with 1 spike, fascicle, glomerule, head, or cluster per stem or culm, Inflorescence branches more than 10 to numerous, Flowers bisexual, Spikelets pedicellate, Spikelets sessile or subsessile, Spikelets dorsally compressed or terete, Spikelet less than 3 mm wide, Spikelets with 1 fertile floret, Spikelets with 2 florets, Spikelets paired at rachis nodes, Spikelets all alike and fertill e, Spikelets in paired units, 1 sessile, 1 pedicellate, Spikelets bisexual, Inflorescence disarticulating between nodes or joints of rachis, rachis fragmenting, Spikelets disarticulating below the glumes, Spikelets falling with parts of disarticulating rachis or pedicel, Inflorescence branches deciduous, falling intact, Spikelets conspicuously hairy , Rachilla or pedicel hairy, Glumes present, empty bracts, Glumes 2 clearly present, Glumes equal or subequal, Glumes equal to or longer than adjacent lemma, Glume surface hairy, villous or pilose, Glumes 1 nerved, Lemmas thin, chartaceous, hyaline, cartilaginous, or membranous, Lemma 3 nerved, Lemma apex acute or acuminate, Lemma mucronate, very shortly beaked or awned, less than 1-2 mm, Lemma margins thin, lying flat, Lemma straight, Callus or base of lemma evidently hairy, Callus hairs shorter than lemma, Stamens 3, Styles 2-fid, deeply 2-branched, Stigmas 2, Fruit - caryopsis.
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Dr. David Bogler

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

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Description

Tall caespitose perennial; culms up to 4 m high. Leaf-blades up to 90 cm long, 3-10 mm wide, flat or markedly channelled, the midrib occupying the greater part of the width, glaucous. Panicle 20-75 cm long, the peduncle glabrous; racemes 2-4(-5) cm long, considerably shorter than the supporting branches, the internodes and pedicels hirsute with hairs up to 7 mm long. Spikelets slightly heteromorphous, 3.8-5.5 mm long, the callus bearded with whitish or greyish hairs up to 2.5 mm long; glumes equal, membranous, lower glume of sessile spikelet hairy on the back, the upper glume glabrous, both glumes of pedicelled spikelet hairy, the hairs at least 4 mm long, often up to 9 mm; lower lemma oblong-elliptic, hairy on the back; upper lemma ovate-lanceolate, ciliate on the margins, acute or very shortly awned, the awn not visible beyond the glumes.
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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flower/Fruit

Fl. & Fr. Per.: October-January.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Saccharum bengalense

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 4
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Saccharum munja

"Munja" redirects here. For other uses, see Upanayana.

Saccharum munja, known as munja (Hindi: मुंज) is a grass found in arid areas and along river banks in India. it belongs to the family Gramineae. It grows up to 2 meters (7 feet) in height. Its white flowers are of ornamental value.

Uses[edit]

Saccharum munja along a river bank

Saccharum munja is used as a raw material for thatching roofs. It is used for making baskets. The plant has medicinal value.[1] Its fibre is used for making ropes. Saccharum munja, a perennial wild grass, is one of the ecologically successful native colonizer of abandoned mines. It forms pure patches on rocky habitats with skeletal soils. It forms extensive root network that binds the soil/pebbles and forms tall thick clumps with high biomass tufts. It is used by low income locals for making ropes, hand fans, baskets, brooms, mat, hut and shields for crop protection. Saccharum munja is a choice species for vegetation and stabilization of erosion-prone rugged slopes and their conversion into biologically productive sites of high socio-economic values. Sharma M, Rau N, Mishra V, Sharma RS (2005) Species. 43:22

References[edit]

  • L R Burdak (1982): Recent advances in desert afforestation, Dehradun, p. 66
  1. ^ Sandeep, Rahar; Nagpal Navneet; Swami Gaurav; Arora Manisha; Bansal Suraj; Bansal Suraj; Singla Shwali; Singla Shwali; Singla Shwali (2010). "Medicinal Aspects of Saccharum munja". Research Journal of Pharmacy and Technology 3 (3): 636–639. 


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Saccharum bengalense

Saccharum bengalense, alternatively Saccharum bengalensis, is a plant of the sugarcane genus found in India. It is also known as baruwa sugarcane or baruwa grass. One of its main ranges is in northern India, specifically in the grasslands of the Terai-Duar. It is a food source for animals such as the Indian rhinoceros and the pygmy hog. This small species of sugarcane bamboo is colored pinkish-green, and is usually around two or three feet tall.

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Notes

Comments

This is a very large tufted grass which is of little account as a fodder plant since cattle and buffaloes will only eat the tender young leaves. A valuable fibre can be extracted from the upper leaf-sheaths of the flowering culm.
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