Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: Throughout Nevada, except for the northwestern counties (Kartesz, 1988). Inyo and Mono Counties, California (Hickman, 1993). In Utah, occurs in Beaver, Box Elder, Juab, Millard, and Tooele Counties (Welsh, 1993).

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Physical Description

Morphology

Physical Description

Perennials, Terrestrial, not aquatic, Stems nodes swollen or brittle, Stems erect or ascending, Stems caespitose, tufted, or clustered, Stems terete, round in cross section, or polygonal, Stems branching above base or distally at nodes, Stem internodes hollow, Stems with inflorescence less than 1 m tall, Stems, culms, or scapes exceeding basal leaves, Leaves mostly cauline, Leaves conspicuously 2-ranked, distichous, Leaves sheathing at base, Leaf sheath mostly open, or loose, Leaf sheath smooth, glabrous, Leaf sheath hairy at summit, throat, or collar, Leaf sheath and blade differentiated, Leaf sheath enlarged, inflated or distended, Leaf blades very short, 0.5-2 cm long, Leaf blades linear, Leaf blades subulate, needle-like, tip pungent, Leaf blades very narrow or filiform, less than 2 mm wide, Leaf blade margins folded, involute, or conduplicate, Leaf blades mostly glabrous, Leaf blades scabrous, roughened, or wrink led, Ligule present, Ligule a fringe of hairs, Inflorescence terminal, Inflorescence a dense slender spike-like panicle or raceme, branches contracted, Inflorescence solitary, with 1 spike, fascicle, glomerule, head, or cluster per stem or culm, Inflorescence densely corymbose, paniculate, or capitate, rays reduced or absent, Inflorescence with 2-10 branches, Peduncle or rachis scabrous or pubescent, often with long hairs, Flowers bisexual, Spikelets pedicellate, Spikelets laterally compressed, Inflorescence or spikelets partially hidden in leaf sheaths, subtended by spatheole, Spikelet less than 3 mm wide, Spikelets with 3-7 florets, Spikelet with 1 fertile floret and 1-2 sterile florets, Spikelets solitary at rachis nodes, Spikelets all alike and fertille, Spikelets with 1 terminal fertile floret and 2 lateral staminate or sterile florets, Spikelets bisexual, Spikelets disarticulating above the glumes, glumes persistent, Rachilla or pedicel hairy, Glumes present, empty br acts, Glumes 2 clearly present, Glumes equal or subequal, Glumes equal to or longer than adjacent lemma, Glumes awned, awn 1-5 mm or longer, Glumes 1 nerved, Lemmas thin, chartaceous, hyaline, cartilaginous, or membranous, Lemma 3 nerved, Lemma body or surface hairy, Lemma apex dentate, 2-fid, Lemma distinctly awned, more than 2-3 mm, Lemma with 1 awn, Lemma awns about equal in length, Lemma awn less than 1 cm long, Lemma awn from sinus of bifid apex, Lemma awns straight or curved to base, Lemma margins thin, lying flat, Lemma straight, Callus or base of lemma evidently hairy, Callus hairs shorter than lemma, Palea present, well developed, Palea membranous, hyaline, Palea about equal to lemma, Palea 2 nerved or 2 keeled, Palea keels winged, scabrous, or ciliate, Stamens 2, Styles 2-fid, deeply 2-branched, Stigmas 2, Fruit - caryopsis, Caryopsis ellipsoid, longitudinally grooved, hilum long-linear.
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Dr. David Bogler

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Calcareous, rocky, limestone basin floors, slopes and washes with Atriplex, Ceratoides, Larrea, Ambrosia, Sarcobatus, Grayia, and Lycium (Kartesz, 1988).

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

Reasons: Blepharidachne kingii is rare in California, occurring only in Inyo and Mono Counties. In Nevada, it is one of the most abundant grasses in the northeastern desert and occurs into Utah and possibly Idaho (if so, it is rare there).

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Wikipedia

Blepharidachne kingii

Blepharidachne kingii is a species of grass known by the common name King's eyelashgrass. It is native to the Great Basin in the United States, where it grows in habitat such as pinyon-juniper woodland.[1] It is rare in California[2] and Idaho,[3] but it is one of the most common grasses of the northeastern deserts of Nevada.[2]

Description[edit source | edit]

Blepharidachne kingii is a perennial bunchgrass growing in clumps or mats of stems 3 to 14 centimeters tall. The curved, twisted, stiff, hairlike leaf blades are up to 3 centimeters long. The inflorescence is a purplish to straw-colored panicle of finely hairy spikelets.[1][4]

Common associates in the flora of the plant's basin and desert habitat include saltbush, winterfat, creosote bush, ragweed, greasewood, hopsage, and boxthorn.[2]

References[edit source | edit]

  1. ^ a b Blepharidachne kingii. The Jepson Manual.
  2. ^ a b c Blepharidachne kingii. NatureServe. 2012.
  3. ^ Blepharidachne kingii. Idaho Department of Fish and Game.
  4. ^ Valdés-Reyna, J. Blepharidachne. Grass Manual. Flora of North America.
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