Articles on this page are available in 1 other language: Spanish (1) (learn more)

Overview

Comprehensive Description

Comments

Another scientific name of this grass species is Eragrostis poaeoides. Love Grasses (Eragrostis spp.) are often difficult to identify. One key characteristic of Lesser Love Grass is the presence of glandular droplets along the margins of its leaf blades. It shares this characteristic with another introduced species, Stinkgrass (Eragrostis cilianensis), which is similar in appearance. Stinkgrass resembles a large version of Lesser Love Grass with an inflorescence that is more compact and cluttered. It usually has more lemmas per spikelet (10-40) and its lemmas are longer (2.0-2.5 mm. in length). Stinkgrass usually has glandular droplets along the margins of its spikelets, while Lesser Love Grass usually lacks this characteristic. Both of these species belong to a group of Love Grasses with the following two characteristics
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Description

This grass is a summer annual about ½-1½' tall, forming a small tuft of leafy culms. These culms are erect to widely spreading and unbranched; they are light green to reddish green, terete, slender, and glabrous. There are 2-4 alternate leaves along the length of each culm; their blades are ascending to widely spreading. The leaf blades are 2-4" long and 3-5 mm. across; they are light green or grayish green, flat, and largely glabrous. The base of each blade is wider than the culm. At regular intervals along the margins of each blade, there are minute glandular droplets (may require 10x hand lens to see). The leaf sheaths are light green to dull purple and longitudinally veined; each sheath is slightly hairy above and glabrous below. At the junction of each sheath and blade, there is a conspicuous tuft of fine white hairs. Each culm terminates in a somewhat airy panicle of spikelets that is 1½-4" long and about one-half as much across; in outline, each panicle is narrowly pyramidal to ovoid. The central axis and lateral branches of each panicle are light green, slender, and glabrous. The lateral branches are widely spreading to ascending, dividing into short lateral branchlets that are divergent. At the tips of these branchlets, there are elongated spikelets about 4-10 mm. long and 1.5-2 mm. across. Immature spikelets are light grayish green to dark purple, while mature spikelets become light tan. Individual spikelets are narrowly oblongoid and flattened in shape, consisting of 5-18 florets and their overlapping lemmas (scales with florets) that are arranged in 2 columnar ranks. Each spikelet is slightly less wide at the top than the bottom. At the bottom of each spikelet, there is a pair of glumes (scales without florets). Individual glumes are about 1.5 mm. long, lanceolate in shape, glabrous, and folded along their keels; one glume is slightly longer than the other. Located above the glumes, the individual lemmas are 1.5-2.0 mm. in length.  The lemmas are lanceolate-ovate in shape, glabrous, 3-veined, and folded along their keels. Hidden behind each lemma, there is a single floret and a membranous palea. The anthers of each floret are about 0.2 mm. long. The blooming period occurs from mid-summer to early fall. The florets are cross-pollinated by the wind. Fertile florets are replaced by tiny ovoid grains (up to 1 mm. long); the latter are small enough to be blown about by the wind. The shallow root system is fibrous. At favorable sites, this grass often forms colonies by reseeding itself.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Brief

Flowering class: Monocot Habit: Herb
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution

Range and Habitat in Illinois

The non-native Lesser Love Grass is occasional to locally common throughout Illinois; it is probably more common than official records indicate. This grass was accidentally introduced into the United States from Eurasia. Habitats include fields, sandy or gravelly areas along railroads, roadsides, cracks in urban sidewalks, areas along paths, and barren waste areas. Open areas with a history of disturbance and scant ground vegetation are preferred.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

"
Global Distribution

Warm temperate and Subtropical regions of Paleotropics, occasionally found as an introduction in the New World

"
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution in Egypt

Nile region, oases and Sinai.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Bibliotheca Alexandrina

Source: Bibliotheca Alexandrina - EOL Ar

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Global Distribution

Subtropical and warm temperate Old World.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Bibliotheca Alexandrina

Source: Bibliotheca Alexandrina - EOL Ar

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution: Pakistan (Sind, Baluchistan, Punjab, N.W.F.P., Gilgit & Kashmir); warm temperate and subtropical regions of the Old World; occasionally found as an introduction in the tropics and the New World.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Widely distributed in India, China and extending to temperate regions and the Mediterranean area.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Mediterranean region, tropical Africa, Himalaya, India, N. Asia.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Annual. Culms slender, tufted, erect or geniculate at base, (5–)15–50(–80) cm tall, 1–2 mm in diam., 3–4-noded, below each node usually a line of glands. Leaf sheaths usually shorter than internodes, along summit and margin with long silky hairs, along veins glandular especially in middle vein or tuberulate hispidulous; ligules a line of hairs; leaf blades flat or involute, 3–15 × 0.2–0.4 cm, adaxial surface scabrous and pilose, abaxial surface glabrous, along middle vein and margins with glands in row. Panicle open, 6–15 × 3–6 cm; branch solitary, ascending or spreading. Spikelets green or dark green, oblong, 3–8 × 1.5–2 mm, 3–16-flowered, with glandular pedicels 3–6 mm. Glumes chartaceous, lanceolate, 1-veined, glandular along veins, lower glume ca. 1.6 mm, upper glume ca. 1.8 mm. Lemma ovate, apex obtuse, lateral veins nearly parallel, midrib glandular, lower lemma 1.5–2 mm. Palea subequal to its lemma, persistent, 2-keeled, along keels ciliolate or scabrous. Stamens 2 or 3; anthers 0.2–0.3 mm. Caryopsis red-brown, oblong or globose, ca. 0.5 mm in diam. Fl. and fr. Jul–Sep. 2n = 40.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Annuals, Terrestrial, not aquatic, Stems nodes swollen or brittle, Stems geniculate, decumbent, or lax, sometimes rooting at nodes, Stems caespitose, tufted, or clustered, Stems terete, round in cross section, or polygonal, Plants viscid, sticky, glandular-hairy, Stem internodes solid or spongy, St em internodes hollow, Stems with inflorescence less than 1 m tall, Stems with inflorescence 1-2 m tall, Stems, culms, or scapes exceeding basal leaves, Leaves mostly basal, below middle of stem, Leaves mostly cauline, Leaves sheathing at base, Leaf sheath mostly open, or loose, Leaf sheath smooth, glabrous, Leaf sheath hairy at summit, throat, or collar, Leaf sheath and blade differentiated, Leaf blades linear, Leaf blades very narrow or filiform, less than 2 mm wide, Leaf blades 2-10 mm wide, Leaf blades mostly flat, Leaf blades mostly glabrous, Ligule present, Ligule a fringe of hairs, Inflorescence terminal, Inflorescence an open panicle, openly paniculate, branches spreading, Inflorescence a contracted panicle, narrowly paniculate, branches appressed or ascending, Inflorescence solitary, with 1 spike, fascicle, glomerule, head, or cluster per stem or culm, Inflorescence branches more than 10 to numerous, Flowers bisexual, Spikelets pedicellate, Spikelets laterally comp ressed, Spikelet less than 3 mm wide, Spikelets with 3-7 florets, Spikelets with 8-40 florets, Spikelets solitary at rachis nodes, Spikelets all alike and fertille, Spikelets bisexual, Spikelets disarticulating above the glumes, glumes persistent, Spikelets disarticulating beneath or between the florets, Rachilla or pedicel glabrous, Glumes present, empty bracts, Glumes 2 clearly present, Glumes equal or subequal, Glumes distinctly unequal, Glumes shorter than adjacent lemma, Glumes 1 nerved, Lemmas thin, chartaceous, hyaline, cartilaginous, or membranous, Lemma similar in texture to glumes, Lemma 3 nerved, Lemma glabrous, Lemma apex truncate, rounded, or obtuse, Lemma awnless, Lemma margins thin, lying flat, Lemma straight, Palea present, well developed, Palea membranous, hyaline, Palea shorter than lemma, Palea 2 nerved or 2 keeled, Palea keels winged, scabrous, or ciliate, Stamens 3, Styles 2-fid, deeply 2-branched, Stigmas 2, Fruit - caryopsis, Caryopsis ellipsoid, longi tudinally grooved, hilum long-linear.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

Dr. David Bogler

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Description

Loosely tufted annual; culms 6-60 cm high, ascending. Leaf-blades flat, up to 12 cm long and 5 mm wide, mostly glabrous and usually with a row of warty glands along the margin. Panicle ovate, 4-20 cm long, fairly dense to open, stiffly branched with short pedicels (lateral pedicels 1-3 mm), usually with glands on pedicels and branchlets. Spikelets 6-16(40)-flowered, narrowly oblong or almost linear, 3-9(15) mm long, 1.3-2 mm wide, yellowish green, leaden grey or purplish, breaking up from the base; glumes subequal, ovate, boat-shaped, 1-1.7 mm long, 1-3-nerved, often glandular on the keel, acute; lemmas broadly ovate to subrotund, 1.5-2 mm long, chartaceous, often glandular on the keel, the lateral nerves distinct, obtuse; palea ± scabrid on the keels, persistent; anthers 3, 0.3 mm long. Caryopsis broadly oblong, 0.7-0.8 mm long, dark brown.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Description

Culm erect, tufted. Blade linear-lanceolate, 3-5 cm long by 2 mm wide, margins with glands in a row along each side, blades surface, sheath-mouth and margins covered with long silky hairs. Inflorescence an open panicle, about 7 cm long by 3 cm wide. Spikelets usually 11-flowered, about 6 mm long by 2 mm wide; glumes chartaceous, lanceolate, 1-nerved, glandular along backside of nerves; the lower glume about 1.3 mm long, shorter than the upper; lemma about 1.7 mm long, chartaceous, ovate, 3-nerved, lateral nerves nearly parallel, midnerve glandular on dorsal side; palea chartaceous, as long as the lemma, upper 2/3 elliptical and lower 1/2 linear, 2-keeled, scabrous along keels. Caryopsis oblong, about 0.6 mm long, reticulate; embryo 1/2-2/3 the length of the caryopsis.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Elevation Range

3600 m
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Diagnostic Description

Diagnostic

"Loosely tufted annual; culms 6-60 cm high, ascending. Leaf-blades flat, up to 12 cm long and 5 mm wide, mostly glabrous and usually with a row of warty glands along the margin. Panicle ovate, 4-20 cm long, fairly dense to open, stiffly branched with short pedicels (lateral pedicels 1-3 mm), usually with glands on pedicels and branchlets. Spikelets 6-16(40)-flowered, narrowly oblong or almost linear, 3-9(15) mm long, 1.3-2 mm wide, yellowish green, leaden grey or purplish, breaking up from the base; glumes subequal, ovate, boat-shaped, 1-1.7 mm long, 1-3-nerved, often glandular on the keel, acute; lemmas broadly ovate to sub rotund, 1.5-2 mm long, chartaceous, often glandular on the keel, the lateral nerves distinct, obtuse; palea ± scabrid on the keels, persistent; anthers 3, 0.3 mm long. Caryopsis broadly oblong, 0.7-0.8 mm long, dark brown."
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Synonym

Poa eragrostis Linnaeus, Sp. Pl. 1: 68. 1753; Eragrostis minor var. minima B. S. Sun & S. Wang; E. poaeoides P. Beauvois, nom illeg. superfl.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Synonym

Eragrostis poaeoides Beauv., Ess. Agrost. 162. 1812; Hsu, Fl. Taiwan 5: 488. 1978; Koyama, Grass. Jap. Neighb. Reg. 250. 1987.
  Poa eragrostis L. Sp. Pl. 68. 1753.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Range and Habitat in Illinois

The non-native Lesser Love Grass is occasional to locally common throughout Illinois; it is probably more common than official records indicate. This grass was accidentally introduced into the United States from Eurasia. Habitats include fields, sandy or gravelly areas along railroads, roadsides, cracks in urban sidewalks, areas along paths, and barren waste areas. Open areas with a history of disturbance and scant ground vegetation are preferred.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

General Habitat

Grasslands
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Damp soils.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Bibliotheca Alexandrina

Source: Bibliotheca Alexandrina - EOL Ar

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Habitat & Distribution

Mountain slopes, grasslands, roadsides. Anhui, Beijing, Fujian, Guizhou, Heilongjiang, Henan, Hubei, Nei Mongol, Ningxia, Qinghai, Shaanxi, Shandong, Taiwan, Xinjiang, Xizang, Yunnan, Zhejiang [tropical, subtropical, and temperate regions of the world].
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Associations

Faunal Associations

The following information applies to Love grasses (Eragrostis spp.) in general. These grasses are one group of host plants for the caterpillars of Poanes hobomok (Hobomok Skipper) and Poanes zabulon (Zabulon Skipper). Because they often grow in dry open areas where grasshoppers occur, occasionally their foliage is eaten by such species as Melanoplus sanguinipes (Migratory Grasshopper) and Orphulella speciosa (Slantfaced Pasture Grasshopper). Other insect feeders include the aphid Colopha ulmicola and the flea beetle Chaetocnema pulicaria (Thomas, 1877; Clark et al., 2004). Most species of love grass, including Lesser Love Grass, provide poor forage for cattle and other mammalian herbivores, although they will be eaten when little else is available.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering and fruiting: May-September
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Flower/Fruit

Fl. & Fr. Per.: May-September.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Life Expectancy

Annual.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Bibliotheca Alexandrina

Source: Bibliotheca Alexandrina - EOL Ar

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Eragrostis minor

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Eragrostis minor

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 11
Specimens with Barcodes: 15
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Cultivation

The preference is full sun, mesic to dry conditions, and barren soil containing gravel or sand. Most growth and development occurs during the summer. Because of its C4 metabolism, this weedy grass is able to tolerate hot dry conditions.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Notes

Comments

Eragrostis minor intergrades with Eragrostis cilianensis, being distinguished by the narrower oblong (rather than ovate) spikelets, shorter lemmas, more open panicle and oblong (rather than globose) grain. No single character can be relied upon to separate the species. For the present purpose, however, grain shape has been taken as decisive in doubtful cases. The characteristic glands are occasionally absent from the leaves giving rise to confusion with Eragrostis nutans (Retz.) Steud. (a perennial) which has not yet been recorded from Pakistan. A diligent search will usually reveal at least a few glands on the panicle branches and pedicels. Annual plants completely devoid of these crateriform glands (although glandular dots are present on the panicle branches) and without the beard at the mouth of the sheath have been separated as Eragrostis rottleri Stapf, a little known species collected only from Madras over 100 years ago. R.R. Stewart 26345 from Gilgit (K) almost matches the type of Eragrostis rottleri. It is better at this stage, however, not to admit Eragrostis rottleri to the Flora of Pakistan on the basis of a single specimen that resembles a species represented by only two or three previous collections. Much more good material must be collected before the true status of Eragrostis rottleri can be determined.

Certain specimens (cf. J.J. Norris 37, 159) with longer spikelets, slightly narrower, less obtuse lemmas, more densely tuberculate-ciliate sheaths and an apparent lack of the characteristic warty glands have been separated as Eragrostis pappiana (Chiov.) Chiov. Examination of Asian, European and African specimens has shown that Eragrostis minor and Eragrostis pappiana intergrade in all respects and no satisfactory way of distinguishing them has been found. Clayton (in Fl. Trop. E. Afr. 234. 1974) has united the two species and for the present this seems the most appropriate course to be adopted in Pakistan.

In view of Ross’s argument that Eragrostis was validly published by Wolf, the more familiar name for this species, Eragrostis poaeoides P. Beauv. is predated by Eragrostis minor which, for now, must be regarded as the correct name.

Little Lovegrass has no known economic value. It occurs as a weed in gardens, irrigated fields and ditches.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!