Overview

Comprehensive Description

Andropogon tenuispatheus (Nash) Nash

Distribution

Wet pine savannas (WLPS).

Notes

Infrequent. Sep–Oct . Thornhill 1193, 1247 (NCSC). Specimens seen in the vicinity: Sandy Run [Neck]: Wilbur 57638 (DUKE!; as Andropogon glomeratus var. pumilus ). [< Andropogon virginicus L. sensu RAB; = Andropogon glomeratus (Walter) Britton, Sterns, & Poggenb. var. pumilus (Vasey) Vasey ex L.H. Dewey sensu FNA; = Weakley]

  • Thornhill, Robert, Krings, Alexander, Lindbo, David, Stucky, Jon (2014): Guide to the Vascular Flora of the Savannas and Flatwoods of Shaken Creek Preserve and Vicinity (Pender & Onslow Counties, North Carolina, U. S. A.). Biodiversity Data Journal 2, 1099: 1099-1099, URL:http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/BDJ.2.e1099
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Plazi

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Andropogon glomeratus (Walter) Britton, Sterns, & Poggenb.

Distribution

Wet pine flatwoods (WPF-T), wet pine savannas (SPS-T, SPS-RF, WLPS, VWLPS).

Notes

Frequent. Sep–Oct . Thornhill 1064, 1151, 1157, 1162, 1218, 1219, 1241, 1243, 1244 (NCSC). Specimens seen in the vicinity: Sandy Run [Hancock]: Taggart SARU 541 (WNC!). [< Andropogon virginicus L. sensu RAB; = Andropogon glomeratus (Walter) Britton, Sterns, & Poggenb. var. glomeratus sensu FNA; = Weakley]

  • Thornhill, Robert, Krings, Alexander, Lindbo, David, Stucky, Jon (2014): Guide to the Vascular Flora of the Savannas and Flatwoods of Shaken Creek Preserve and Vicinity (Pender & Onslow Counties, North Carolina, U. S. A.). Biodiversity Data Journal 2, 1099: 1099-1099, URL:http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/BDJ.2.e1099
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Description

General: Grass Family (Poaceae). It is a persistent, warm-season, perennial, low growing bunchgrass that is found from late summer to fall and reaches a height of 6 feet. It can be distinguished from other warm season grasses by its thick, massive, reddish brown, terminal inflorescence composed of paired silky racemes and its flattened blue green foliage. The culms are erect, 50 to 150 cm tall, compressed, with broad keeled, overlapping lower sheaths and the flat tufts often forming dense, usually glaucous clumps. The sheaths are occasionally villous; blades elongate, 3 to 8 mm wide; inflorescence dense and feathery. The sessile spikelets are 3 to 4 mm long with a straight awn 1 to 1.5 cm long. The fruit/seed period begins in the fall and ends in the winter.

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USDA NRCS Louisiana State Office, National Plant Data Center, & the Grazing Land Conservation Initiative-South Central Region

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

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Alternative names

bushy bluestem, bushy broomsedge, lowland broomsedge, and bushybeard bluestem. Some botanists consider Andropogon glomeratus and Andropogon virginicus as one species. However, the two grasses are distinct and consistent in appearance and are currently recognized as separate species.

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Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

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Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Bushy beardgrass is found in low roadsides, moist pinelands, brackish and freshwater marsh borders, sloughs, and wet ditches. It is native to and is found in nearly all of the eastern United States, mainly in the southern states, and extending west to California. Bushy beardgrass is also found in the West Indies, Yucatan, and Central America. For current distribution, please consult the Plant Profile page for this species on the PLANTS Web site.

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USDA NRCS Louisiana State Office, National Plant Data Center, & the Grazing Land Conservation Initiative-South Central Region

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

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Physical Description

Morphology

Physical Description

Perennials, Aquatic, leaves emergent, Terrestrial, not aquatic, Rhizomes present, Stems nodes swollen or brittle, Stems erect or ascending, Stems geniculate, decumbent, or lax, sometimes rooting at nodes, Stems caespitose, tufted, or clustered, Stems terete, round in cross section, or polygonal, Stems branching above base or distally at nodes, Stem internodes solid or spongy, Stems with inflorescence less than 1 m tall, Stems with inflorescence 1-2 m tall, Stems with inflorescence 2-6 m tall, Stems, culms, or scapes exceeding basal leaves, Leaves mostly basal, below middle of stem, Leaves mostly cauline, Leaves conspicuously 2-ranked, distichous, Leaves sheathing at base, Leaf sheath mostly open, or loose, Leaf sheath smooth, glabrous, Leaf sheath hairy, hispid or prickly, Leaf sheath or blade keeled, Leaf sheath and blade differentiated, Leaf blades linear, Leaf blades 2-10 mm wide, Leaf blades mostly flat, Leaf blade margins folded, involute, or conduplicate, Leaf blades mostly glabrous, Leaf blades more or less hairy, Leaf blades scabrous, roughened, or wrinkled, Ligule present, Ligule an unfringed eciliate membrane, Ligule a fringed, ciliate, or lobed m embrane, Inflorescence terminal, Inflorescence solitary, with 1 spike, fascicle, glomerule, head, or cluster per stem or culm, Inflorescence densely corymbose, paniculate, or capitate, rays reduced or absent, Inflorescence a panicle with narrowly racemose or spicate branches, Inflorescence with 2-10 branches, Inflorescence branches paired or digitate at a single node, Flowers bisexual, Flowers unisexual, Spikelets pedicellate, Spikelets sessile or subsessile, Spikelets laterally compressed, Inflorescence or spikelets partially hidden in leaf sheaths, subtended by spatheole, Spikelet less than 3 mm wide, Spikelets with 2 florets, Spikelets paired at rachis nodes, Spikelets in paired units, 1 sessile, 1 pedicellate, Pedicellate spikelet rudimentary or absent, usually sterile, Spikelets bisexual, Spikelets unisexual, Inflorescence disarticulating between nodes or joints of rachis, rachis fragmenting, Spikelets disarticulating below the glumes, Spikelets falling with parts of di sarticulating rachis or pedicel, Glumes present, empty bracts, Glumes 2 clearly present, Glumes equal or subequal, Glumes equal to or longer than adjacent lemma, Glumes keeled or winged, Glume surface hairy, villous or pilose, Lemmas thin, chartaceous, hyaline, cartilaginous, or membranous, Lemma 1 nerved, Lemma 3 nerved, Lemma glabrous, Lemma apex dentate, 2-fid, Lemma distinctly awned, more than 2-3 mm, Lemma with 1 awn, Lemma awn 1-2 cm long, Lemma awn from sinus of bifid apex, Lemma margins thin, lying flat, Lemma straight, Callus or base of lemma evidently hairy, Callus hairs shorter than lemma, Stamens 3, Styles 2-fid, deeply 2-branched, Stigmas 2, Fruit - caryopsis.
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Dr. David Bogler

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

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Type Information

Isotype for Andropogon reinoldii León
Catalog Number: US 1296094
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Card file verified by examination of alleged type specimen
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): Bro. León
Year Collected: 1921
Locality: Finca La Salle, cerca de La Loma del Gato; alt. 950m., Greater Antilles, Cuba, West Indies
Elevation (m): 950 to 950
  • Isotype: León, Bro. 1922. Mem. Soc. Cub. Hist. Nat. "Felipe Poey". 5.
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© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

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Type collection for Andropogon macrourus var. hirsutior Hack.
Catalog Number: US 98968
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): C. T. Mohr
Year Collected: 1884
Locality: Mobile, Alabama, United States, North America
  • Type collection: Hackel, E. 1889. Monogr. Phan. 6: 409.
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Type fragment for Andropogon macrourum Michx.
Catalog Number: US 75520
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Card file verified by examination of alleged type specimen
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): Collector unknown
Locality: Carolina / Virginia, United States, North America
  • Type fragment: Michaux, A. 1803. Fl. Bor.-Amer. 1: 56.
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Isotype for Andropogon macrourus var. abbreviatus Hack. in A. DC.
Catalog Number: US 907276
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): A. Gray
Year Collected: 1859
Locality: Near Pleasant Bridge., New Jersey, United States, North America
  • Isotype: Hackel, E. 1889. Monogr. Phan. 6: 408.
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Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 8 specimens in 1 taxon.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0.5 - 0.5
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Dispersal

Establishment

Adaptation: The USDA Hardiness Zones for bushy beardgrass is 5 to 10. Bushy beardgrass tolerates hot climates and coastal conditions as long as constant moisture is present. It is found in irregularly to seasonally inundated or saturated loamy soil. Bushy beardgrass is not salt tolerant and generally will not grow at levels above 0.5 parts per thousand. Bushy beardgrass does not tolerate heavy shade but will grow under light shade conditions.

Rootstock or seeds propagate bushy beardgrass. However, of the two, the best propagation method is transplantation of rootstock with liberal amounts of root-laden soil onto wet mineral soils in late winter or early spring. The plants should be spaced at 18 inches because the rate of spread is slow. Spread is generally less than 0.2 feet per year in unconsolidated sediment.

Seed germination is best when first stored at room temperature for 7-14 months. The planting should be in late winter as a dormant seeding or when daily temperatures average in the low 60’s. For planting, the seed can be broadcast and culti-packed if the right field conditions exist. The seeding rate should be 10-12 pure live seed/acre. The seeds should be planted to a depth of ¼ - ¾ inch. If the right field conditions do not exist or intensive seedbed preparation is undesirable, then disk the site and leave the surface as rough as possible. Do not create a smooth uniform appearance for the seedbed. Broadcast the seed and allow nature to cover the seeds. When seeding under minimal seedbed preparation, increase the seeding rate by 50%. It is not recommended to mix bushy beardgrass seeds with cool season grass seeds. In parts of the United States where cool season grasses dominate, the warm season grasses can be taken over because they develop slower than the cool season grasses. It is also recommended that seed not be moved more than 300 miles north or 200 miles south of its point of origin.

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USDA NRCS Louisiana State Office, National Plant Data Center, & the Grazing Land Conservation Initiative-South Central Region

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Andropogon glomeratus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 3
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Status

Please consult the PLANTS Web site and your State Department of Natural Resources for this plant’s current status, such as, state noxious status and wetland indicator values.

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Management

Cultivars, improved and selected materials (and area of origin)

Please check the Vendor Database, expected to be on-line through the PLANTS Web site in 2001 by clicking on Plant Materials or contact your local NRCS Field Office. Common seed and container plants are readily available from a number of growers, wholesalers, and retailers of native seed.

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Bushy beardgrass does not require fertilizers as the plants can grow in low fertility areas. Overgrazing bushy beardgrass results in an increase of this plant. However, if bushy beardgrass becomes weedy, then burning or mowing is recommended. Check with the local extension service for herbicides. Bushy beardgrass has no known pests or problems.

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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Uses

Livestock: Although it rates low as a forage grass, bushy beardgrass can be used as forage during the summer, fall, and winter months; however, it is more palatable during the early spring. The palatability is increased after a late winter burning.

Ornamental Landscaping: Bushy beardgrass is used as an ornamental grass in landscapes because of its showy plumes that turn a rust color during late fall and early winter. It is recommended for golf courses, around pond edges, stream banks and other wet sites.

Wildlife: Bushy beardgrass benefits wildlife. The finch, junco, and tree sparrow eat the seeds. The white-tailed deer and rabbits browse the plant. Bushy beardgrass also provides cover for mottled ducks and fawns (white-tailed deer).

Conservation Practices: Bushy beardgrass, because of its growth habit, potentially has application when established with the following conservation practices; however, conservation practice standards vary by state. For localized information, consult your local NRCS Field Office. NRCS practices include the following: 327-Conservation Cover; 386-Field Border; 390-Riparian Herbaceous Cover; 393-Filter Strip; 512-Pasture and Hay Planting; 550-Range Planting; 560-Access Road; 562-Recreation Area Improvement; 643-Restoration and Management of Declining Habitats; 644-Wetland Wildlife Habitat Management; 647-Early Successional Habitat Development/Management; 656-Constructed Wetland; 657-Wetland Restoration; 658-Wetland Creation; 659-Wetland Enhancement.

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Wikipedia

Andropogon glomeratus

Andropogon glomeratus is a species of grass known by the common names bushy bluestem and bushy beardgrass. This grass reaches heights approaching two meters (6 feet) and has large, fluffy cream-colored inflorescences. Each dense, tufted inflorescence has several pairs of hairy spikelets. The leaves may reach over a meter in length. This bunchgrass is native to the Americas, where it is widespread. It has also naturalized in other areas.

Uses[edit]

It is cultivated as an ornamental grass. This species also has potential as a noxious weed and is easily spread via seed contamination. It is a pest plant in Hawaii, where it has been documented on the island of Kaua‘i.[1][2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Herbst, D. R. and W. D. Clayton. (1998). "Notes on the grasses of Hawai‘i: new records, corrections, and name changes". In: Evenhuis, N. L. and S. E. Miller, eds. Records of the Hawaii Biological Survey for 1997. Part 1: Articles. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers. 55:17-38. 
  2. ^ "Andropogon glomeratus". Pacific Island Ecosystems at Risk (PIER). 
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