Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
EN
Endangered

Red List Criteria
B1ac(ii,iv)

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2004

Assessor/s
Taylor, P., Maree, S. & Chitaukali, W. (GMA Africa Workshop)

Reviewer/s
Amori, G. & Schlitter, D. (Rodent Red List Authority)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Endangered as it has an extent of occurrence less than 5,000 km², its distribution is severely fragmented, and there is burning of the species habitat that causes large fluctuations in the species' area of occupancy and the number of mature individuals.
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Population

Population Trend
Unknown
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Wikipedia

Otomys

African vlei rats (Otomys), also known as groove-toothed rats, live in many areas of sub-Saharan Africa. Most species live in marshlands, grasslands, and similar habitats[2] and feed on the vegetation of such areas, occasionally supplementing it with roots and seeds. The name "vlei" refers to the South African term for intermittent, seasonal, or perennial bodies of standing water.

Otomys are compact rodents with a tendency to shorter faces and legs than other types of rats. The tails also are shorter than most Muridae, typically between one third and two thirds of the body length.[3] The coat colour varies according to species,[2] but generally they have the typical agouti brown-to-grey coats typical of mice and other small wild rodents. Species living in warm or temperate regions tend to have unusually large ears for murids (e.g. Otomys irroratus), whereas some of the alpine species, such as Otomys sloggetti have markedly smaller ears. (However, the latter species may no longer belong in the genus Otomys).

Depending on the species adult Otomys have a body length between 12 and 22 cm (5–9 inches) and weigh 90 to 260 grams (3–9 oz).

Species[edit]

[4] Genus Otomys - groove-toothed or vlei rats

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Genus Otomys", Mammal Species of the World, 3rd ed.
  2. ^ a b The Kingdon Pocket Guide to African Mammals, Jonathan Kingdon (2004) Russel Friedman Books ISBN 1-875091-14-9
  3. ^ Mills, Gus and Hes, Lex (1997). The Complete Book of Southern African Mammals. Cape Town: Struik Publishers. ISBN 0947430555. 
  4. ^ "Otomys", Mammal Species of the World, 3rd ed.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g [1], Specific limits and emerging diversity patterns in East African populations of laminate-toothed rats, genus Otomys (Muridae: Murinae: Otomyini): Revision of the Otomys typus complex.


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