Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:16
Specimens with Sequences:15
Specimens with Barcodes:15
Species:4
Species With Barcodes:4
Public Records:5
Public Species:1
Public BINs:1
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Wikipedia

Wallaroo

For other uses, see Wallaroo (disambiguation).

A wallaroo is any of three closely related species of moderately large macropod, intermediate in size between the kangaroos and the wallabies. The word "wallaroo" is a portmanteau of "wallaby" and "kangaroo". In general, a large, slim-bodied macropod of the open plains is called a "kangaroo"; a small to medium-sized one, particularly if it is relatively thick-set, is a "wallaby": most wallaroos are only a little smaller than a kangaroo, fairly thickset, and are found in open country. All share a particular habit of stance: wrists raised, elbows tucked close into the body, and shoulders thrown back, and all have a large, black-skinned rhinarium.

The common wallaroo (Macropus robustus or wallaroo) is the best-known species. There are four subspecies of the common wallaroo: the eastern wallaroo and the euro, which are both widespread, and two of more restricted range, one from Barrow Island, the other from the Kimberley.

The black wallaroo (Macropus bernardus) occupies an area of steep, rocky ground in Arnhem Land. At around 60 to 70 cm in length (excluding tail) it is the smallest wallaroo and the most heavily built. Males weigh 19 to 22 kg, females about 13 kg. Because it is very wary and is found only in a small area of remote and very rugged country, it is little known.

Macropus antilopinus is the exception among wallaroos. It is, essentially, the far-northern equivalent of the eastern and western grey kangaroos. Like them, it is a creature of the grassy plains and woodlands, and gregarious, where the other wallaroos are solitary. Because of this difference, it is sometimes called the antilopine kangaroo.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Groves, C. P. (2005). Wilson, D. E.; Reeder, D. M, eds. Mammal Species of the World (3rd ed.). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 63–65. OCLC 62265494. ISBN 0-801-88221-4. 
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Macropus

Macropus is a marsupial genus that belongs to the family Macropodidae. It has 13 species which are further divided into 3 subgenera. The genus includes all terrestrial kangaroos, wallaroos and several species of wallaby. The term itself is derived from the Ancient Greek makros "long" and pous "foot". A further 11 extinct species are recognised. The type species is the eastern grey kangaroo.

Taxonomy[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Groves, C. P. (2005). Wilson, D. E.; Reeder, D. M, eds. Mammal Species of the World (3rd ed.). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 58–70. OCLC 62265494. ISBN 0-801-88221-4. 
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