Overview

Brief Summary

Introduction

This order of wingless insects consists of about 350 known species. They hide under bark, in litter, and in rock crevices, and feed on algae, lichens, and vegetable debris.

  Oldest fossil considered as Archaeognatha is from the Devonian (390 million years old) from Gaspé, Québec (Labandeira et al., 1988). However, there is little evidence that this fossil is a member of Archaeognatha; it may instead be a member of the stem-group of insects or of stem-Dicondylia.   

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Jumping Bristletail Overview

The jumping bristletails can be found throughout the world.  Their name comes from the ability to jump about 25 cm. at a time. They can survive in various environments ranging from the desert to the arctic.  They prefer to live under leaf litter and feed on algae.  They live up to about four years and grow up to about 15 mm. long.  They have scales, antennae, and three-pronged tails.  Their abdomen has eversible vesicles attached, which absorb water.  Their exoskeletons are thin and the vesicles prevent dehydration.  They undergo simple metamorphosis.  They attach themselves to a substrate before molting.  They molt their entire live, through both the youth and adult stages.  The young take about two years to become sexually mature.  After mating, a female will lay about thirty eggs at one time.  They can be found at night by shining a flashlight for about fifteen minutes on a spot with leaf litter.  The archaeognatha will be drawn to the light.

  • Borror, Donald, Charles Triplehorn, and Norman Johnson. An Introduction to the Study of Insects. 6th ed. Saunders College Publishing, 1989. 171-174. Print.
  • "Archaeognatha." Wikipedia. 2013. .
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Rhianna Hruska

Supplier: Rhianna Hruska

Unreviewed

Article rating from 1 person

Average rating: 5.0 of 5

Comprehensive Description

Characteristics

Recent archaeognathans share two notable derived features:  
     
  • Compound eyes enlarged, medially contiguous 

       

  • Specialized musculature of abdomen, which allows them to jump by a rapid downward bending 
  Archaeognathans also share a number of primitive features. Their mandibles are monocondylic, that is, with only one condyle (the joint or socket-like attachement point to the head capsule), whereas other insects have two condyles ("dicondylic"). This primitive mouthpart feature gives the order its name (Arche - beginning, gnathos - jaw).

   Their abdominal segments bear styles, which are small appendages moveable by muscles. They can be seen underneath the abdomen in the following picture:

 Styli may be remnants of ancestral limbs. 

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:434Public Records:332
Specimens with Sequences:366Public Species:10
Specimens with Barcodes:354Public BINs:63
Species:13         
Species With Barcodes:12         
          
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Barcode data

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Archaeognatha

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!