Data about <i>Morinda citrifolia</i>

TraitBank assembles data records from many providers. Select a row for more details about the record, or search TraitBank.

Distribution

 
introduced range includes
Additional detail
Hawaii, USA
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
Additional detail
Lower 48 United States of America
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
Additional detail
Puerto Rico
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
Additional detail
U. S. Virgin Islands
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
geographic distribution
  • geographic distribution
    A description of the geographic distribution, or range, of the taxon. Includes descriptions of global, regional, or political aspects of range and whether the taxon is native or introduced in portions of the range and endemicity.
    http://rs.tdwg.org/ontology/voc/SPMInfoItems#Distribution
Additional detail
Asia - Burma
Missouri Botanical Garden  
Additional detail
Asia - Cambodia
Missouri Botanical Garden  
Additional detail
Asia - China - Guangdong
Missouri Botanical Garden  
Additional detail
Asia - China - Hainan
Missouri Botanical Garden  
Additional detail
Asia - China - Taiwan
Missouri Botanical Garden  
Additional detail
Asia - India
Missouri Botanical Garden  
Additional detail
Asia - Indonesia
Missouri Botanical Garden  
Additional detail
Asia - Japan - Okinawa
Missouri Botanical Garden  
Additional detail
Asia - Malaysia
Missouri Botanical Garden  
Additional detail
Asia - Papua New Guinea
Missouri Botanical Garden  
Additional detail
Asia - Philippines
Missouri Botanical Garden  
Additional detail
Asia - Sri Lanka
Missouri Botanical Garden  
Additional detail
Asia - Thailand
Missouri Botanical Garden  
Additional detail
Asia - Vietnam
Missouri Botanical Garden  
Additional detail
Mesoamerica - Belize
Missouri Botanical Garden  
Additional detail
Mesoamerica - Costa Rica
Missouri Botanical Garden  
Additional detail
Mesoamerica - Honduras
Missouri Botanical Garden  
Additional detail
Mesoamerica - Honduras - Islas de la Bahía
Missouri Botanical Garden  
Additional detail
Mesoamerica - Mexico - Quintana Roo
Missouri Botanical Garden  
Additional detail
Mesoamerica - Nicaragua
Missouri Botanical Garden  
Additional detail
Mesoamerica - Panama
Missouri Botanical Garden  
Additional detail
Mesoamerica - Panama - Bocas del Toro
Missouri Botanical Garden  
Additional detail
Mesoamerica - Panama - Canal Area
Missouri Botanical Garden  
Additional detail
Mesoamerica - Panama - Colón
Missouri Botanical Garden  
Additional detail
Mesoamerica - Panama - San Blas
Missouri Botanical Garden  
Additional detail
North America - United States
Missouri Botanical Garden  
Additional detail
North America - United States - Florida
Missouri Botanical Garden  
Additional detail
Oceania - Australia
Missouri Botanical Garden  
Additional detail
Oceania - Solomon Isl
Missouri Botanical Garden  
Additional detail
South America - Colombia - Antioquia
Missouri Botanical Garden  
Additional detail
South America - Guyana
Missouri Botanical Garden  
 
latitude min
  • latitude
    The geographic latitude (in decimal degrees, using the spatial reference system given in geodeticDatum) of the geographic center of a Location. Positive values are north of the Equator, negative values are south of it. Legal values lie between -90 and 90, inclusive.
    http://rs.tdwg.org/dwc/terms/decimalLatitude
Additional detail
22.6 degrees
OBIS Environmental Information  
 
latitude max
  • latitude
    The geographic latitude (in decimal degrees, using the spatial reference system given in geodeticDatum) of the geographic center of a Location. Positive values are north of the Equator, negative values are south of it. Legal values lie between -90 and 90, inclusive.
    http://rs.tdwg.org/dwc/terms/decimalLatitude
Additional detail
22.6 degrees
OBIS Environmental Information  
 
longitude min
  • longitude
    The geographic longitude (in decimal degrees, using the spatial reference system given in geodeticDatum) of the geographic center of a Location. Positive values are east of the Greenwich Meridian, negative values are west of it. Legal values lie between -180 and 180, inclusive.
    http://rs.tdwg.org/dwc/terms/decimalLongitude
Additional detail
69.5 degrees
OBIS Environmental Information  
 
longitude max
  • longitude
    The geographic longitude (in decimal degrees, using the spatial reference system given in geodeticDatum) of the geographic center of a Location. Positive values are east of the Greenwich Meridian, negative values are west of it. Legal values lie between -180 and 180, inclusive.
    http://rs.tdwg.org/dwc/terms/decimalLongitude
Additional detail
69.5 degrees
OBIS Environmental Information  

Physical Description

 
flower color
Additional detail
white
  • white
    An achromatic color of maximum brightness; the color of objects that reflect nearly all light of all visible wavelengths.
    http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/PATO_0000323
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
leaf color
Additional detail
green
  • green
    A color hue with medium-low wavelength of that portion of the visible spectrum lying between yellow and blue, evoked in the human observer by radiant energy with wavelengths of approximately 490 to 570 nanometers.
    http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/PATO_0000320
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
plant height median
Additional detail
20 ft mature
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
plant height max
Additional detail
20 ft base age
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
fruit or seed color
Additional detail
yellow
  • yellow
    A color hue with medium wavelength of that portion of the visible spectrum lying between orange and green, evoked in the human observer by radiant energy with wavelengths of approximately 570 to 590 nanometers.
    http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/PATO_0000324
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
wood density
Additional detail
0.54 g/cm³
Global Wood Density Database  
Additional detail
0.72 g/cm³
Global Wood Density Database  
 
growth habit
Additional detail
shrub
  • shrub
    Perennial, multi-stemmed woody plant that is usually less than 4 to 5 meters (13 to 16 feet) in height. Shrubs typically have several stems arising from or near the ground, but may be taller than 5 meters or single-stemmed under certain environmental conditions.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/shrub
Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Department of Botany  
Additional detail
shrub
  • shrub
    Perennial, multi-stemmed woody plant that is usually less than 4 to 5 meters (13 to 16 feet) in height. Shrubs typically have several stems arising from or near the ground, but may be taller than 5 meters or single-stemmed under certain environmental conditions.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/shrub
Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Department of Botany  
Additional detail
shrub
  • shrub
    Perennial, multi-stemmed woody plant that is usually less than 4 to 5 meters (13 to 16 feet) in height. Shrubs typically have several stems arising from or near the ground, but may be taller than 5 meters or single-stemmed under certain environmental conditions.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/shrub
Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Department of Botany  
Additional detail
shrub
  • shrub
    Perennial, multi-stemmed woody plant that is usually less than 4 to 5 meters (13 to 16 feet) in height. Shrubs typically have several stems arising from or near the ground, but may be taller than 5 meters or single-stemmed under certain environmental conditions.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/shrub
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
Additional detail
shrub
  • shrub
    Perennial, multi-stemmed woody plant that is usually less than 4 to 5 meters (13 to 16 feet) in height. Shrubs typically have several stems arising from or near the ground, but may be taller than 5 meters or single-stemmed under certain environmental conditions.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/shrub
Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Department of Botany  
Additional detail
shrub
  • shrub
    Perennial, multi-stemmed woody plant that is usually less than 4 to 5 meters (13 to 16 feet) in height. Shrubs typically have several stems arising from or near the ground, but may be taller than 5 meters or single-stemmed under certain environmental conditions.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/shrub
Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Department of Botany  
Additional detail
shrub
  • shrub
    Perennial, multi-stemmed woody plant that is usually less than 4 to 5 meters (13 to 16 feet) in height. Shrubs typically have several stems arising from or near the ground, but may be taller than 5 meters or single-stemmed under certain environmental conditions.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/shrub
Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Department of Botany  
Additional detail
shrub
  • shrub
    Perennial, multi-stemmed woody plant that is usually less than 4 to 5 meters (13 to 16 feet) in height. Shrubs typically have several stems arising from or near the ground, but may be taller than 5 meters or single-stemmed under certain environmental conditions.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/shrub
Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Department of Botany  
Additional detail
shrub
  • shrub
    Perennial, multi-stemmed woody plant that is usually less than 4 to 5 meters (13 to 16 feet) in height. Shrubs typically have several stems arising from or near the ground, but may be taller than 5 meters or single-stemmed under certain environmental conditions.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/shrub
Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Department of Botany  
Additional detail
shrub
  • shrub
    Perennial, multi-stemmed woody plant that is usually less than 4 to 5 meters (13 to 16 feet) in height. Shrubs typically have several stems arising from or near the ground, but may be taller than 5 meters or single-stemmed under certain environmental conditions.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/shrub
Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Department of Botany  
Additional detail
shrub
  • shrub
    Perennial, multi-stemmed woody plant that is usually less than 4 to 5 meters (13 to 16 feet) in height. Shrubs typically have several stems arising from or near the ground, but may be taller than 5 meters or single-stemmed under certain environmental conditions.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/shrub
Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Department of Botany  
Additional detail
shrub
  • shrub
    Perennial, multi-stemmed woody plant that is usually less than 4 to 5 meters (13 to 16 feet) in height. Shrubs typically have several stems arising from or near the ground, but may be taller than 5 meters or single-stemmed under certain environmental conditions.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/shrub
Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Department of Botany  
Additional detail
shrub
  • shrub
    Perennial, multi-stemmed woody plant that is usually less than 4 to 5 meters (13 to 16 feet) in height. Shrubs typically have several stems arising from or near the ground, but may be taller than 5 meters or single-stemmed under certain environmental conditions.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/shrub
Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Department of Botany  
Additional detail
subshrub
  • subshrub
    Low-growing shrub usually under 0.5 m (1.5 feet) tall, never exceeding 1 meter (3 feet) tall at maturity.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/subshrub
Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Department of Botany  
Additional detail
subshrub
  • subshrub
    Low-growing shrub usually under 0.5 m (1.5 feet) tall, never exceeding 1 meter (3 feet) tall at maturity.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/subshrub
Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Department of Botany  
Additional detail
subshrub
  • subshrub
    Low-growing shrub usually under 0.5 m (1.5 feet) tall, never exceeding 1 meter (3 feet) tall at maturity.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/subshrub
Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Department of Botany  
Additional detail
tree
  • tree
    Perennial, woody plant with a single stem (trunk), normally greater than 4 to 5 meters (13 to 16 feet) in height; under certain environmental conditions, some tree species may develop a multi-stemmed or short growth form (less than 4 meters or 13 feet in height).
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/tree
Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Department of Botany  
Additional detail
tree
  • tree
    Perennial, woody plant with a single stem (trunk), normally greater than 4 to 5 meters (13 to 16 feet) in height; under certain environmental conditions, some tree species may develop a multi-stemmed or short growth form (less than 4 meters or 13 feet in height).
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/tree
Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Department of Botany  
Additional detail
tree
  • tree
    Perennial, woody plant with a single stem (trunk), normally greater than 4 to 5 meters (13 to 16 feet) in height; under certain environmental conditions, some tree species may develop a multi-stemmed or short growth form (less than 4 meters or 13 feet in height).
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/tree
Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Department of Botany  
Additional detail
tree
  • tree
    Perennial, woody plant with a single stem (trunk), normally greater than 4 to 5 meters (13 to 16 feet) in height; under certain environmental conditions, some tree species may develop a multi-stemmed or short growth form (less than 4 meters or 13 feet in height).
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/tree
Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Department of Botany  
Additional detail
tree
  • tree
    Perennial, woody plant with a single stem (trunk), normally greater than 4 to 5 meters (13 to 16 feet) in height; under certain environmental conditions, some tree species may develop a multi-stemmed or short growth form (less than 4 meters or 13 feet in height).
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/tree
Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Department of Botany  
Additional detail
tree
  • tree
    Perennial, woody plant with a single stem (trunk), normally greater than 4 to 5 meters (13 to 16 feet) in height; under certain environmental conditions, some tree species may develop a multi-stemmed or short growth form (less than 4 meters or 13 feet in height).
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/tree
Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Department of Botany  
Additional detail
tree
  • tree
    Perennial, woody plant with a single stem (trunk), normally greater than 4 to 5 meters (13 to 16 feet) in height; under certain environmental conditions, some tree species may develop a multi-stemmed or short growth form (less than 4 meters or 13 feet in height).
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/tree
Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Department of Botany  
Additional detail
tree
  • tree
    Perennial, woody plant with a single stem (trunk), normally greater than 4 to 5 meters (13 to 16 feet) in height; under certain environmental conditions, some tree species may develop a multi-stemmed or short growth form (less than 4 meters or 13 feet in height).
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/tree
Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Department of Botany  
Additional detail
tree
  • tree
    Perennial, woody plant with a single stem (trunk), normally greater than 4 to 5 meters (13 to 16 feet) in height; under certain environmental conditions, some tree species may develop a multi-stemmed or short growth form (less than 4 meters or 13 feet in height).
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/tree
Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Department of Botany  
Additional detail
tree
  • tree
    Perennial, woody plant with a single stem (trunk), normally greater than 4 to 5 meters (13 to 16 feet) in height; under certain environmental conditions, some tree species may develop a multi-stemmed or short growth form (less than 4 meters or 13 feet in height).
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/tree
Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Department of Botany  
Additional detail
tree
  • tree
    Perennial, woody plant with a single stem (trunk), normally greater than 4 to 5 meters (13 to 16 feet) in height; under certain environmental conditions, some tree species may develop a multi-stemmed or short growth form (less than 4 meters or 13 feet in height).
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/tree
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
Additional detail
tree
  • tree
    Perennial, woody plant with a single stem (trunk), normally greater than 4 to 5 meters (13 to 16 feet) in height; under certain environmental conditions, some tree species may develop a multi-stemmed or short growth form (less than 4 meters or 13 feet in height).
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/tree
Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Department of Botany  
Additional detail
tree
  • tree
    Perennial, woody plant with a single stem (trunk), normally greater than 4 to 5 meters (13 to 16 feet) in height; under certain environmental conditions, some tree species may develop a multi-stemmed or short growth form (less than 4 meters or 13 feet in height).
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/tree
Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Department of Botany  
Additional detail
tree
  • tree
    Perennial, woody plant with a single stem (trunk), normally greater than 4 to 5 meters (13 to 16 feet) in height; under certain environmental conditions, some tree species may develop a multi-stemmed or short growth form (less than 4 meters or 13 feet in height).
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/tree
Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Department of Botany  
Additional detail
tree
  • tree
    Perennial, woody plant with a single stem (trunk), normally greater than 4 to 5 meters (13 to 16 feet) in height; under certain environmental conditions, some tree species may develop a multi-stemmed or short growth form (less than 4 meters or 13 feet in height).
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/tree
Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Department of Botany  
 
shape
Additional detail
erect
  • erect
    A positional quality inhering in a bearer by virtue of the bearer's being upright in position or posture.
    http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/PATO_0000622
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
primary growth form
  • primary growth form
    The primary growth form on the landscape in relation to soil stabilization on slopes and streamsides. Each plant species is assigned the single growth form that most enhances its ability to stabilize soil.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/PrimaryGrowthForm
Additional detail
single stem
  • single stem
    Plant development by the production of one stem. Examples: corn (Zea mays) and American beech (Fagus grandifolia).
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/singleStem
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
carbon-to-nitrogen ratio
Additional detail
low (<23)
  • low (<23)
    The percentage of organic carbon divided by the percentage of total nitrogen in organic material is lower than 23.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/lowCNRatio
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
foliage texture
Additional detail
rough
  • rough
    A texture quality inhering in a bearer by virtue of the bearer's irregular surface.
    http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/PATO_0000700
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  

Ecology

 
frost free days min
  • frost free days
    The average number of frost-free days within the plant’s known geographical range. For cultivars, the geographical range is defined as the area to which the cultivar is well adapted rather than marginally adapted.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/FrostFreeDays
Additional detail
365 days
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
precipitation tolerance min
  • precipitation tolerance
    Minimum tolerable rainfall (in inches), expressed as the average annual minimum precipitation that occurs 20% of the time (i.e., the probability of it being this dry in any given year is 20%) at the driest climate station within the known geographical range of the plant. geographical range of the plant. For cultivars, the geographical range is defined as the area to which the cultivar is well adapted rather than marginally adapted.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/PrecipitationTolerance
Additional detail
35 inch
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
precipitation tolerance max
  • precipitation tolerance
    Minimum tolerable rainfall (in inches), expressed as the average annual minimum precipitation that occurs 20% of the time (i.e., the probability of it being this dry in any given year is 20%) at the driest climate station within the known geographical range of the plant. geographical range of the plant. For cultivars, the geographical range is defined as the area to which the cultivar is well adapted rather than marginally adapted.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/PrecipitationTolerance
Additional detail
100 inch
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
soil depth min
  • soil depth
    The minimum depth of soil required for good growth. Plants that do not have roots such as rootless aquatic plants (floating or submerged) and epiphytes are assigned a minimum root depth value of zero.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/SoilDepth
Additional detail
24 inch
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
low temperature tolerance min
  • low temperature tolerance
    The minimum tolerable temperature is the lowest temperature recorded in the plant’s historical range. If this is not available, the record low January temperature recorded at climate stations within the current geographical range of the plant is used. This definition does not apply to summer annuals.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/TemperatureTolerance
Additional detail
36 degrees Fahrenheit
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
habitat
Additional detail
beach
  • beach
    A landform consisting of loose rock particles such as sand, gravel, shingle, pebbles, cobble, or even shell fragments along the shoreline of a body of water.
    http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/ENVO_00000091
Environments - EOL project  
Additional detail
coast
  • coast
    The general region of indefinite width that extends from the sea inland to the first major change in terrain features.
    http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/ENVO_00000303
Environments - EOL project  
Additional detail
mangrove swamp
  • mangrove swamp
    An swamp formed of trees and shrubs that grow in saline coastal habitats in the tropics and subtropics.
    http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/ENVO_00000057
Environments - EOL project  
Additional detail
scrubland
  • scrubland
    Area covered with low-growing or stunted perennial vegetation and usually not mixed with trees.
    http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/ENVO_00000300
Environments - EOL project  
 
habitat includes
Additional detail
non-marine
IRMNG - Interim Register of Marine and Nonmarine Genera.  
 
wetland indicator status (NWPL)
  • wetland indicator status (NWPL)
    Five indicator statuses, or ratings, are used in the United States National Wetland Plant List to designate a plant species’ preference for occurrence in a wetland or upland: Upland (UPL), Facultative Upland (FACU), Facultative (FAC), Facultative Wetland (FACW), and Obligate Wetland (OBL). The statuses represent the estimated probability of a species occurring in wetlands versus nonwetlands in a region.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/WetlandIndicatorStatus
Additional detail
facultative upland
  • facultative upland
    Nonhydrophyte. Usually occur in non-wetlands, but may occur in wetlands.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/nwpl_facu
National Wetland Plant List  
Additional detail
facultative upland
  • facultative upland
    Nonhydrophyte. Usually occur in non-wetlands, but may occur in wetlands.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/nwpl_facu
National Wetland Plant List  
Additional detail
upland
National Wetland Plant List  
 
fire resistance
Additional detail
is not fire resistant
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
allelopathic effect
  • allelopathic effect
    This is an assay of any direct or indirect, harmful or beneficial effect of one plant on another through the production of chemical compounds (allelochemicals) that escape in the environment.
    http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/TO_0000624
Additional detail
no known allelopathy
  • no known allelopathy
    There is no evidence that the organism produces compounds (allelochemicals) that influence the growth, survival, and reproduction of other organisms.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/allelopathyUnknown
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
soil requirements
Additional detail
adapted to coarse textured soils
  • adapted to coarse textured soils
    This plan can establish and grow in soil with a coarse textured surface layer. Includes: Sand, Coarse sand, Fine sand, Loamy coarse sand, Loamy fine sand, Loamy very fine sand, Very fine sand, Loamy sand.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/coarseSoilYes
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
Additional detail
adapted to fine textured soils
  • adapted to fine textured soils
    This plan can establish and grow in soil with a fine textured surface layer. Includes: Sandy clay, Silty clay, Clay.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/fineSoilYes
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
Additional detail
adapted to medium textured soils
  • adapted to medium textured soils
    This plan can establish and grow in soil with a medium textured surface layer. Includes: Silt, Sandy clay loam, Very fine sandy loam, Silty clay loam, Silt loam, Loam, Fine sandy loam, Sandy loam, Coarse sandy loam.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/mediumSoilYes
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
anaerobic soil tolerance
Additional detail
none
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
drought tolerance
Additional detail
medium (normal)
  • medium (normal)
    Average. A quality inhering in a bearer by virtue of the bearer's exhibiting no deviation from normal or average.
    http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/PATO_0000461
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
calcareous soil tolerance
  • calcareous soil tolerance
    The relative tolerance of the plant to calcareous soil. Calcareous soil is defined as soil containing sufficient free CaCO3 and other carbonates to effervesce visibly or audibly when treated with cold 0.1M HCl. These soils usually contain from 10 to almost 1000g/kg CaCO3 equivalent.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/CalcareousSoilTolerance
Additional detail
medium (normal)
  • medium (normal)
    Average. A quality inhering in a bearer by virtue of the bearer's exhibiting no deviation from normal or average.
    http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/PATO_0000461
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
moisture use
Additional detail
medium
  • medium
    Mid-way between small and large in number, quantity, magnitude or extent.
    http://ncicb.nci.nih.gov/xml/owl/EVS/Thesaurus.owl#C49507
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
salt tolerance
Additional detail
none
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
shade tolerance
Additional detail
medium (normal)
  • medium (normal)
    Average. A quality inhering in a bearer by virtue of the bearer's exhibiting no deviation from normal or average.
    http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/PATO_0000461
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  

Life History and Behavior

 
life cycle habit
Additional detail
perennial
  • perennial
    Of plant duration, a plant whose life span extends over more than two growing seasons, c.f. annual, biennial, ephemeral, of flowering with respect to architecture, hapaxanthic, monocarpic, pleonanthic
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/perennial
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
shedability
Additional detail
evergreen
  • evergreen
    Evergreen (plant): A quality inhering in a plant by virtue of the bearer's disposition to retain foliage.
    http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/PATO_0001733
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
bloom period
Additional detail
spring
  • spring
    The season between the vernal equinox and the summer solstice.
    http://ncicb.nci.nih.gov/xml/owl/EVS/Thesaurus.owl#C94731
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
active growth period
Additional detail
year round
  • year round
    An activity or period that continues throughout the entire year.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/yearRound
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
growth rate
Additional detail
moderate
  • moderate
    Moderate rate. A rate which is neither relatively high nor low.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/moderateRate
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
life span
Additional detail
high life span
  • high life span
    Increased life span: A life span which is relatively high.
    http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/PATO_0001603
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
grass growth type
Additional detail
not a low growing grass
  • not a low growing grass
    The growing point (terminal meristem) of the vegetative grass tiller does not remain at or near the crown.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/lowGrowingGrassNo
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
resprout ability after clipping
Additional detail
will resprout
  • will resprout
    The plant will resprout following top (above ground biomass) removal.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/ResproutYes
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
germination requirements
Additional detail
cold stratification not required
  • cold stratification not required
    Cold stratification does not significantly increase the seed germination percentage of this plant.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/coldStratificationNo
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
fire tolerance
Additional detail
medium (normal)
  • medium (normal)
    Average. A quality inhering in a bearer by virtue of the bearer's exhibiting no deviation from normal or average.
    http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/PATO_0000461
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
fruit/seed abundance
Additional detail
medium
  • medium
    Mid-way between small and large in number, quantity, magnitude or extent.
    http://ncicb.nci.nih.gov/xml/owl/EVS/Thesaurus.owl#C49507
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
seed period end
Additional detail
summer
  • summer
    The season between the summer solstice and the autumnal equinox.
    http://ncicb.nci.nih.gov/xml/owl/EVS/Thesaurus.owl#C94732
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
seed period begin
Additional detail
spring
  • spring
    The season between the vernal equinox and the summer solstice.
    http://ncicb.nci.nih.gov/xml/owl/EVS/Thesaurus.owl#C94731
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
fruit/seed persistence
Additional detail
fruit/seed is not persistent
  • fruit/seed is not persistent
    The fruit or seed is not persistent on the plant.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/fruitPersistentNo
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
seeds per pound average
Additional detail
30,200
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
seed spread rate
Additional detail
slow
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
seedling survival
Additional detail
medium
  • medium
    Mid-way between small and large in number, quantity, magnitude or extent.
    http://ncicb.nci.nih.gov/xml/owl/EVS/Thesaurus.owl#C49507
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
vegetative spread rate
Additional detail
none
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  

Physiology and Cell Biology

 
soil pH min
  • soil pH
    The soil pH, of the top 12 inches of soil, within the plant’s known geographical range. For cultivars, the geographical range is defined as the area to which the cultivar is well adapted rather than marginally adapted.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/SoilPH
Additional detail
5.5
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
soil pH max
  • soil pH
    The soil pH, of the top 12 inches of soil, within the plant’s known geographical range. For cultivars, the geographical range is defined as the area to which the cultivar is well adapted rather than marginally adapted.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/SoilPH
Additional detail
7
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
nitrogen fixation
  • nitrogen fixation
    The process in which nitrogen is taken from its relatively inert molecular form (N2) in the atmosphere and converted into nitrogen compounds useful for other chemical processes, such as ammonia, nitrate and nitrogen dioxide.
    http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/GO_0009399
Additional detail
high (>160 lb N/acre/year)
  • high (>160 lb N/acre/year)
    Plants with high nitrogen fixation. More than 160 lb nitrogen per acre per year fixed in monoculture.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/highNitrogenFixation
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
primary macronutrient requirements
Additional detail
medium
  • medium
    Mid-way between small and large in number, quantity, magnitude or extent.
    http://ncicb.nci.nih.gov/xml/owl/EVS/Thesaurus.owl#C49507
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  

Conservation

 
extinction status
Additional detail
extant
IRMNG - Interim Register of Marine and Nonmarine Genera.  

Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

 
livestock bloat potential
Additional detail
none
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
horticulture
Additional detail
flower is not conspicuous
  • flower is not conspicuous
    Flowers are not conspicuous from a landscaping aesthetics standpoint.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/flowerConspicuousNo
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
Additional detail
fruit/seed is conspicuous
  • fruit/seed is conspicuous
    The fruit or seed is conspicuous from a landscaping aesthetics standpoint.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/fruitSeedConspicuousYes
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
Additional detail
is not fall conspicuous
  • is not fall conspicuous
    The leaves or fruits are not conspicuous during Autumn from a landscaping aesthetics standpoint.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/fallConspicuousNo
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
Additional detail
not suitable for the coppice method of silviculture
  • not suitable for the coppice method of silviculture
    The plant is not suitable for the coppice method of silviculture. Coppicing completely removes the canopy of woody plants, cutting them at or just above ground level.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/coppicePotentialNo
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database  
 
foliage porosity winter
  • foliage porosity winter
    Indicates the porosity (coverage) of the foliage during the winter months. Foliage porosity is an important factor when trees or shrubs are used as windbreaks for the protection of crops and livestock shelters. Denser (or less porous) foliage allows more wind to pass through.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/FoliagePorosityWinter
Additional detail
dense (low porosity)
  • dense (low porosity)
    A porosity quality inhering in a bearer by virtue of the bearer's being incapable of admitting the passage of gas or liquid through pores or interstices.
    http://eol.org/schema/terms/lowPorosity
USDA NRCS PLANTS Database