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Overview

Brief Summary

You often find shrimp and small crabs swimming in shallow water or on the beach. Larger crabs and lobsters are found in deeper water. These animals belong to the decapods. There are all kinds of decapods, some of which are considered a true delicacy, and not just by humans.
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Ecology

Associations

Known predators

Decapoda (other decapods) is prey of:
carnivores
Actinopterygii
Homo sapiens
Fundulus heteroclitus
Anatidae
Anguilliformes
Thunninae
Enhydra lutris
Octopoda
fungi
Collembola
benthic carnivores
Concholepas concholepas
Sicyases sanguineus
Larus dominicanus
Lontra felina
Bos taurus
Lepus californicus
Lepus townsendii
Spermophilus
high carnivores
Copepoda
Callinectes sapidus
Chondrichthyes
Scombridae
Carangidae
decomposers/microfauna
phytoplankton
organic stuff
Epinephelinae
Cephalopoda
Cheloniidae
Octopus
Decapoda
Stomatopoda
Anomura
Asteroidea
Gastropoda
Cnidaria
Crangon
Pandalidae
Ammodytes marinus
Clupea harengus
Alosa pseudoharengus
Scomber
Peprilus triacanthus
Actinonaias ellipsiformis
Tridonta arctica
Pollachius pollachius
Merluccius bilinearis
Urophycis regia
Urophycis tenuis
Urophycis chuss
Gadidae
Melanogrammus aeglefinus
Hemitripterus americanus
Myoxocephalus octodecemspinosus
Leucoraja erinacea
Leucoraja ocellata
Amblyraja radiata
Macrozoarces americanus
Brosme brosme
Anarhichas
Tautogolabrus adspersus
Triglidae
Sebastes marinus
Pleuronectes ferrugineus
Scophthalmus aquosus
Paralichthys dentatus
Glyptocephalus cynoglossus
Hippoglossina oblonga
Pleuronectes americanus
Hippoglossoides platessoides
Hippoglossus hippoglossus
Mustelus canis
Squalus acanthias
Lophius americanus
Cynoscion
Pomatomus saltatrix
Odontoceti


Based on studies in:
India, Cochin (Brackish water)
USA: Rhode Island (Coastal)
unknown (epipelagic zone, Tropical)
USA: Alaska, Aleutian Islands (Coastal)
Malaysia (Swamp)
Pacific: Bay of Panama (Littoral, Rocky shore)
USA: Florida, Everglades (Estuarine)
Puerto Rico, Puerto Rico-Virgin Islands shelf (Reef)
USA, Northeastern US contintental shelf (Coastal)
Russia (Agricultural)
Chile, central Chile (Littoral, Rocky shore)
USA: California, Cabrillo Point (Grassland)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • S. Z. Qazim, Some problems related to the food chain in a tropical estuary. In: Marine Food Chains, J. H. Steele, Ed. (Oliver and Boyd, Edinburgh, 1970), pp. 45-51, from p. 50.
  • J. N. Kremer and S. W. Nixon, A Coastal Marine Ecosystem: Simulation and Analysis, Vol. 24 of Ecol. Studies (Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1978), from p. 12.
  • S. W. Nixon and C. A. Oviatt, Ecology of a New England salt marsh, Ecol. Monogr. 43:463-498, from p. 491 (1973).
  • C. A. Simenstad, J. A. Estes, K. W. Kenyon, Aleuts, sea otters, and alternate stable-state communities, Science 200:403-411, from p. 404 (1978).
  • N. N. Smirnov, Food cycles in sphagnous bogs, Hydrobiologia 17:175-182, from p. 179 (1961).
  • T. Mizuno and J. I. Furtado, Food chain. In: Tasek Bera, J. I. Furtado and S. Mori, Eds. (Junk, The Hague, Netherlands, 1982), pp. 357-359, from p. 358.
  • B. A. Menge, J. Lubchenco, S. D. Gaines and L. R. Ashkenas, A test of the Menge-Sutherland model of community organization in a tropical rocky intertidal food web, Oecologia (Berlin) 71:75-89, from p. 85 (1986).
  • J. C. Castilla, Perspectivas de investigacion en estructura y dinamica de communidades intermareales rocosas de Chile Central. II. Depredadores de alto nivel trofico, Medio Ambiente 5(1-2):190-215, from p. 203 (1981).
  • S. W. Nixon and C. A. Oviatt, Ecology of a New England salt marsh, Ecol. Monog. 43:463-498, from p. 491 (1973).
  • W. E. Odum and E. J. Heald, The detritus-based food web of an estuarine mangrove community, In Estuarine Research, Vol. 1, Chemistry, Biology and the Estuarine System, Academic Press, New York, pp. 265-286, from p. 281 (1975).
  • N. V. Parin, Ichthyofauna of the Epipelagic Zone (Israel Program for Scientific Translations, Jerusalem, 1970; U.S. Department of Commerce Clearinghouse for Federal Scientific and Technical Information, Springfield, VA 22151), from p. 154.
  • L. D. Harris and L. Paur, A quantitative food web analysis of a shortgrass community, Technical Report No. 154, Grassland Biome. U.S. International Biological Program (1972), from p. 17.
  • Link J (2002) Does food web theory work for marine ecosystems? Mar Ecol Prog Ser 230:1–9
  • Opitz S (1996) Trophic interactions in Caribbean coral reefs. ICLARM Tech Rep 43, Manila, Philippines
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Known prey organisms

Decapoda (other decapods) preys on:
basic food
detritus
benthic macrofauna
Amphipoda
Gadiformes
Dinoflagellata
Copepoda
Bivalvia
Nitella
Cryptocoryne
Blyxa
fungi
bacteria
algae
limpets
Thais triangularis
Thais melones
Nematoda
Crustacea
Polychaeta
Actinopterygii
Cumacea
Gambusia
Heterandria formosa
organic stuff
Decapoda
Stomatopoda
Anomura
Isopoda
Pycnogonidae
Tanaidae
Echinoidea
Gastropoda
Priapula
Ophiuroidea
Hemichordata
Holothuroidea
Echiuroidea
Sipunculidae
Ectoprocta
Cirripedia
Ascidia
Porifera
Cnidaria
Anthozoa
Engraulidae
Cephalopoda
Octopus
Asteroidea
Scaphopoda
Neoloricata
phytoplankton
Calanus
Pteropods
Crangon
Mysidae
Pandalidae
Gammaridae
Hyperiidae
Caprellidae
Ostreoida

Based on studies in:
India, Cochin (Brackish water)
USA: Rhode Island (Coastal)
USA: Alaska, Aleutian Islands (Coastal)
Malaysia (Swamp)
Pacific: Bay of Panama (Littoral, Rocky shore)
Chile, central Chile (Littoral, Rocky shore)
USA: Florida, Everglades (Estuarine)
USA, Northeastern US contintental shelf (Coastal)
Puerto Rico, Puerto Rico-Virgin Islands shelf (Reef)
unknown (epipelagic zone, Tropical)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • S. Z. Qazim, Some problems related to the food chain in a tropical estuary. In: Marine Food Chains, J. H. Steele, Ed. (Oliver and Boyd, Edinburgh, 1970), pp. 45-51, from p. 50.
  • J. N. Kremer and S. W. Nixon, A Coastal Marine Ecosystem: Simulation and Analysis, Vol. 24 of Ecol. Studies (Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1978), from p. 12.
  • S. W. Nixon and C. A. Oviatt, Ecology of a New England salt marsh, Ecol. Monogr. 43:463-498, from p. 491 (1973).
  • C. A. Simenstad, J. A. Estes, K. W. Kenyon, Aleuts, sea otters, and alternate stable-state communities, Science 200:403-411, from p. 404 (1978).
  • T. Mizuno and J. I. Furtado, Food chain. In: Tasek Bera, J. I. Furtado and S. Mori, Eds. (Junk, The Hague, Netherlands, 1982), pp. 357-359, from p. 358.
  • B. A. Menge, J. Lubchenco, S. D. Gaines and L. R. Ashkenas, A test of the Menge-Sutherland model of community organization in a tropical rocky intertidal food web, Oecologia (Berlin) 71:75-89, from p. 85 (1986).
  • J. C. Castilla, Perspectivas de investigacion en estructura y dinamica de communidades intermareales rocosas de Chile Central. II. Depredadores de alto nivel trofico, Medio Ambiente 5(1-2):190-215, from p. 203 (1981).
  • S. W. Nixon and C. A. Oviatt, Ecology of a New England salt marsh, Ecol. Monog. 43:463-498, from p. 491 (1973).
  • W. E. Odum and E. J. Heald, The detritus-based food web of an estuarine mangrove community, In Estuarine Research, Vol. 1, Chemistry, Biology and the Estuarine System, Academic Press, New York, pp. 265-286, from p. 281 (1975).
  • N. V. Parin, Ichthyofauna of the Epipelagic Zone (Israel Program for Scientific Translations, Jerusalem, 1970; U.S. Department of Commerce Clearinghouse for Federal Scientific and Technical Information, Springfield, VA 22151), from p. 154.
  • Link J (2002) Does food web theory work for marine ecosystems? Mar Ecol Prog Ser 230:1–9
  • Opitz S (1996) Trophic interactions in Caribbean coral reefs. ICLARM Tech Rep 43, Manila, Philippines
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:34,926Public Records:25,195
Specimens with Sequences:28,506Public Species:1,925
Specimens with Barcodes:25,519Public BINs:3,244
Species:3,384         
Species With Barcodes:2,565         
          
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Barcode data

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Decapoda

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