Overview

Distribution

Range Description

Phyllospadix serrulatus occurs in the Pacific from the Alaska Peninsula to Oregon, USA.
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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: Limited to the coasts of Alaska, British Columbia, Washington, and Oregon.

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B.C.; Alaska.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Herbs; nodes with 2 roots. Leaves: sheath 4--20 cm, margins not overlapping; blade 30--60 cm ´ 1--4 mm, margins serrulate distally, apex obtuse to truncate or rarely slightly notched; veins 5--7. Generative shoot 1--6 cm, nodes 1, without leaves, of 1(--2) spathes. Inflorescences: peduncles 11--40 ´ 1--2 mm; staminate bract 4--5.5 ´ 2--3 mm; pistillate bract 4--8 ´ 1.5--2 mm, base not narrowed, apex obtuse to truncate. Fruits 4--5 ´ 5 mm.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
Along the Pacific coast of North America, this species grows in the upper intertidal zone (+1.5 m to mean lower low water) (Green and Short 2003). Phyllospadix spp. grow on rocky substrates in regions with high wave exposure (Hemminga and Duarte 2000).

Systems
  • Marine
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Comments: Surf-beaten rocky coasts, from +1.5 m to mean low tide level, according to Phillips and Menez, 1988 (B88PHI01AKUS).

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Upper tidal to subtidal, attached to rocks or rarely on deep clay substrates; - 6m.
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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 6 - 20

Comments: Seventeen occurrences listed in Phillips, 1979 (A79PHI01AKUS). Additional occurrences are likely to be discovered as botanical inventories along the coast of British Columbia and southern Alaska proceed.

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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering and fruiting summer.
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2010

Assessor/s
Short, F.T., Carruthers, T.J.R., Waycott, M., Kendrick, G.A., Fourqurean, J.W., Callabine, A., Kenworthy, W.J. & Dennison, W.C.

Reviewer/s
Livingstone, S., Harwell, H. & Carpenter, K.E.

Contributor/s

Justification
This is a common species within suitable habitat and the population status is thought to be stable. There are no major threats although there are some localized declines due to coastal development and mechanical damage. This species is listed as Least Concern.
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National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

Reasons: Coastal marine monocot of rocky intertidal areas of Alaska, British Columbia, Washington, and Oregon; in British Columbia considered relatively common but of some conservation concern.

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Population

Population
The population status of this species is thought to be stable.

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Major Threats
There are no major threats to this species. Localized threats include coastal development and modifications and over-water structures in the form of ferry terminals, commercial docks. Mechanical damage from boats and dredging is also a minor localized threat.
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Comments: No known threats.

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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are no known species-specific conservation measures for this species. It is not clear if the federal, provincial or state, or local administrative laws and ordinances recognize this species in the Northeast Pacific (Green and Short 2003).
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Wikipedia

Phyllospadix serrulatus

Phyllospadix serrulatus is a plant species found along the shorelines of British Columbia and southern Alaska. It is found is salt marshes in the intertidal zone.[1]

Phyllospadix serrulatus is a grass-like herb with leaves up to 60 cm long, with teeth along the margins toward the tip.[2][3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Paul Friedrich August Ascherson. 1868. Linnaea 35: 169, Phyllospadix serrulatus
  2. ^ Flora of North America vol 22, Phyllospadix serrulatus
  3. ^ Hartog, C.D. & J. Kuo. 2006. Taxonomy and biogeography of seagrasses. 1–23. In Seagrasses. Springer, Dordtrecht.
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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Accepted as a species by Kartesz (1994 and 1999). Has been included in Phyllospadix scouleri in the past, but recent isozyme and common garden work by McMillan & Phillips (1981) indicates that this is a distinct species.

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