Articles on this page are available in 1 other language: Spanish (1) (learn more)

Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

introduced; Calif.; sw Europe.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Bulbs 5–20+, not clustered on stout primary rhizome, rhizomes absent, increase bulbs absent or ± equaling parent bulbs, never appearing as basal cluster, ovoid, 1–2 × 1–2 cm; outer coats enclosing renewal bulbs, ± translucent, yellow-brown, obscurely cellular-reticulate, thin, membranous, meshes delicate, cells vertically elongate, contorted, without fibers; inner coats white, cells obscure, quadrate, or not visible. Leaves persistent, green at anthesis, 2–3, basally sheathing, sheaths not extending much above soil surface; blade solid, flat, not falcate, ± carinate, 15–50 cm × 3–15 mm, margins entire. Scape persistent, clustered, 1–4, erect, solid, sharply 3-angled, 10–40 cm × 1–10 mm. Umbel persistent, lax, loose, 3–15-flowered, ± 1-sided, bulbils unknown; spathe bracts persistent, 1–2, 3-veined, narrowly lanceolate, ± equal, apex acute. Flowers becoming pendent, campanulate, 10–18 mm; tepals erect to spreading, white with prominent green midrib, lanceolate, ± equal, becoming membranous in fruit, margins entire, apex acute; stamens included; anthers yellow; pollen yellow; ovary crestless; style linear, ± equaling stamens; stigma capitate, scarcely thickened, unlobed; pedicel 15–25 mm. Seeds appendaged with evident caruncle. Seed coat dull; cells minutely roughened. 2n = 18.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Disturbed sites; 0--100m.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Associations

Foodplant / saprobe
colony of Botrytis dematiaceous anamorph of Botryotinia squamosa is saprobic on Allium triquetrum

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / pathogen
colony of sporangium of Peronospora destructor infects and damages live Allium triquetrum

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering Mar--Apr.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Allium triquetrum

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Allium triquetrum

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 3
Specimens with Barcodes: 3
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Edibility

The bulbous roots just under the surface are similar to shallots and are edible as well as the green stalks.

Public Domain

Supplier: Aaron Poulos

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Allium triquetrum

Allium triquetrum is a bulbous flowering plant in the genus Allium (onions and garlic) native to the Mediterranean basin. It is known in English as three-cornered leek.

Distribution[edit]

Allium triquetrum is native to south-western Europe, north-western Africa, Madeira and the Canary Islands, where it grows in meadows, woodland clearings, on river banks and roadside verges from sea level to an altitude of 850 metres (2,790 ft).[3] It has also been introduced to the British Isles, New Zealand, Turkey, Australia, California, Oregon, and South America.[3][4][5]

Description[edit]

Allium triquetrum produces stems 17–59 centimetres (7–23 in) tall, which are concavely triangular in cross-section. Each stem produces an umbel inflorescence of 4–19 flowers in January–May in the species' native environment.[3] The tepals are 10–18 millimetres (0.4–0.7 in) long and white, but with a "strong green line".[6] Each plant has 2–3 narrow, linear leaves, each up to 15 cm (6 in) long.[3] The leaves have a distinct onion smell when crushed.

Culinary uses[edit]

Allium triquetrum is known as "three-cornered leek", because the ridge on the greens creates a cross-section resembling a three-pointed star, whereas garden leeks have flat tepals. All parts of the plant, from the bulb to the flowers, are edible fresh (for example in pestos)[7] or cooked,[8] with "a subtle flavour like leek or spring onion".[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Plant List
  2. ^ Tropicos
  3. ^ a b c d C. Aedo. "Allium L." (PDF). In S. Castroviejo et al.. Flora Iberica. Retrieved April 4, 2012. 
  4. ^ BONAP (Biota of North America Project) floristic synthesis, Allium triquetrum
  5. ^ Wild Picnic, a gallery of useful and edible plants in Wellington and the Wairarapa, New Zealand. Onionweed, Allium triquetrum
  6. ^ Clive A. Stace (1997). "Allium L. – Onions". New Flora of the British Isles (2nd edition ed.). Cambridge University Press. pp. 936–941. ISBN 978-0-521-58935-2. 
  7. ^ Shaw, Hank. "Hunter Angler Gardener Cook". Retrieved 27 March 2013. 
  8. ^ Clay, Xanthe. "Recipes made from nature's supermarket". The Telegraph (UK). Retrieved 27 March 2013. 
  9. ^ Pozzi, Doris. "Hello Little Weed - Recipes". Retrieved 27 March 2013. 
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Notes

Comments

Allium triquetrum is a garden escape, introduced from southwestern Europe, and is potentially a noxious weed.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!