Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Distribution in Egypt

Mediterranean region and Sinai.

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Global Distribution

Widespread in the Mediterranean region, Sinai.

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introduced; Calif.; s Europe.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Plants up to 50 cm tall. Bulbs globose, coats scaly, thick, whitish. Leaves shorter than the scape, linear, up to 2 cm broad. Scape angular. Umbels with laxly arranged flowers. Pedicels up to 3 cm long. Tepals pure white, elliptic to ovate, obtuse, 7-9 mm long. Filaments about half the length of the tepals, triangular, entire. Style longer than the stamens.
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Description

Bulbs 1–10+, not clustered on stout primary rhizome, rhizomes absent, bulbs absent or ± equaling parent bulbs, never appearing as basal cluster, subglobose, 1–2 × 1–2 cm; outer coats enclosing renewal bulbs, brown, cellular-reticulate, membranous, reticulum delicate, cells ± quadrate, without fibers; inner coats white, cells obscure, ± rectangular, vertically elongate. Leaves persistent, green at anthesis, 2–3, sheathing proximal 1/5–1/4 scape; blade solid, flat, not falcate, carinate, 15–50 cm × 5–20 mm, margins entire to denticulate. Scape persistent, solitary, erect, solid, ± triquetrous, 2-edged or slightly winged proximally, terete distally, 20–60 cm × 2–7 mm. Umbel persistent, erect, loose, 10–25-flowered, ± hemispheric, bulbils unknown; spathe bract persistent, 1, 8–9-veined, ovate, ± equal, equaling pedicel, apex acute. Flowers ± erect, saucer-shaped, 7–12 mm; tepals spreading, white, broadly elliptic, ± equal, becoming membranous and connivent over capsule, margins entire, apex obtuse; stamens included; anthers yellow; pollen yellow; ovary crestless; style linear, ± equaling stamens; stigma capitate, scarcely thickened, unlobed; pedicel 15–35 mm. Seed coat not known.
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Ecology

Habitat

Sandy and stony places.

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Disturbed sites; 0--100m.
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Associations

Foodplant / sap sucker
Neotoxoptera formosana sucks sap of Allium neapolitanum

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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering Mar--Apr.
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Life Expectancy

Perennial.

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Wikipedia

Allium neapolitanum

Allium neapolitanum (Naples Garlic, Daffodil Garlic, False Garlic, Flowering Onion, Naples Onion, Guernsey Star-of-Bethlehem, Neapolitan Garlic, Star, White Garlic, Wood Garlic) is a perennial bulbous plant of the genus Allium, the onion family. It is native to southern Europe, north Africa, and the Middle East. It is classed as an invasive species in parts of the U.S.[1], and is found primarily in the U.S. states of California, Texas, Louisiana, and Florida.[2]

It is cultivated by gardeners for its ornamental value. It bears large heads of pure white flowers in early spring, and is suitable for borders, pots, or forcing in a cool house. Allium neapolitanum typically grows to a height of between 12 and 18 inches.[2]

There are several varieties of A. neapolitanum, including:

  • Allium neapolitanum ssp. philippi
  • Allium neapolitanum ssp. grandiflorum[2]

Allium neapolitanum seems to have beta-adrenergic antagonist properties.[3]

References

  1. ^ http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=ALNE3
  2. ^ a b c http://www.alliumflower.net/allium_neapolitanum/allium_neapolitanum.html
  3. ^ Nencini C, Franchi GG, Micheli L (June 2010). "Cardiovascular receptor binding affinity of aqueous extracts from Allium species". International journal of food sciences and nutrition 61 (4): 433–9. PMID 20446820. 
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Notes

Comments

Allium neapolitanum is a garden escape, introduced from southern Europe.
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Comments

It is a commonly cultivated species in gardens.
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