Overview

Distribution

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Allium cratericola Eastw.:
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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Calif.
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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: Endemic to California; occurs in the Klamath Ranges, North Coast Ranges, north and central Sierra Nevada Foothils, southern High Sierra Nevada, Tehachapi Mountain Area, Western Transverse Ranges, and the San Jacinto Mountains (Hickman 1993).

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Bulbs 1–3, not clustered on stout primary rhizome, ovoid, 1.5–2.5 × 1–2 cm; outer coats enclosing 1 or more bulbs, brown or gray, membranous, lacking cellular reticulation or cells arranged in only 2–3 rows distal to roots, ± quadrate, without fibers; inner coats white, cells obscure, ± quadrate, or not visible. Leaves usually deciduous with scape, withering from tip at anthesis, 1–2, basally sheathing, sheaths not extending much above soil surface; blade solid, straight or weakly falcate, flat or broadly channeled, 10–30 cm × 1–21 mm, margins entire. Scape usually forming abcission layer and deciduous with leaves after seeds mature, frequently breaking at this level after pressing, solitary, erect, solid, terete, 2–12 cm × 1–3 mm. Umbel persistent, erect, compact, 20–30-flowered, hemispheric, bulbils unknown; spathe bracts persistent, 2–4(–6), 10–16-veined, ovate, ± equal, apex acuminate. Flowers campanulate, 7–14 mm; tepals erect, white or pink to purplish with dark greenish brown or purple midveins, lance-oblong, elliptic, or ± oblanceolate, ± equal, becoming papery and investing fruit, margins entire, apex obtuse; stamens included; anthers yellow; pollen yellow; ovary crested; processes 3, central, rounded, minute, margins entire; style linear, equaling stamens; stigma capitate, scarcely thickened, unlobed; pedicel 5–18 mm. Seed coat dull; cells ± smooth. 2n = 14, 28.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Allium parvum Kellogg var. brucae M. E. Jones; A. parvum var. jacintense Munz
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Type Information

Isotype for Allium cratericola Eastw.
Catalog Number: US 1734252
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Verified from the card file of type specimens
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): A. Eastwood
Year Collected: 1918
Locality: O.D. crater in sand, Mt. St. Helena., California, United States, North America
  • Isotype: Eastwood, A. 1934. Leafl. W. Bot. 1: 132.
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Ecology

Habitat

Serpentine, volcanic, and granitic soil; 300--1800m.
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Comments: Open, serpentine, volcanic, or granitic places; 300-1800 m (Hickman 1993 and FNA 2002).

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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 6 - 80

Comments: The precise number of distinct occurrences is unknown, however, as of March 2007 there are 56 accession records in the Consortium of California Herbaria database; 29 of these have been collected since 1980.

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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering Mar--Jun.
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G3 - Vulnerable

Reasons: Allium cratericola is restricted to California and, although it occurs across a large area, it has a somewhat restricted elevation range and soil preference. There is no element occurrence data available, however, it is uncommon according to Hickman (1993) and does not have a large number of collections in California herbaria.

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Notes

Comments

Populations of Allium cratericola from southern California are 2-leaved, while those from the north are either 1- or 2-leaved or sometimes a mixture of both forms.
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