Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Bulbs 1–3, not clustered on primary rhizome, with 0–2 stalked basal bulbels, ovoid to globose, 1–1.6 × 0.8–1.4 cm; outer coats enclosing 1 or more bulbs, brown, membranous, lacking cellular reticulation or cells arranged in only 2–3 rows distal to roots, ± quadrate, without fibers; inner coats pink or white, cells obscure, quadrate. Leaves persistent, 1, basally sheathing, sheath not extending much above soil level; blade solid, terete, 8–22 cm × 1–2.5 mm. Scape persistent, solitary, erect, solid, terete, 5–17 cm × 1–3 mm. Umbel persistent, erect, ± compact, 5–50-flowered, hemispheric to globose, bulbils unknown; spathe bracts persistent, (2–)3, 3–6-veined, ovate to lanceolate, ± equal, apex acuminate. Flowers campanulate, 8–12 mm; tepals erect, pale pink to deep reddish purple, rarely white, lanceolate to ovate, ± equal or inner longer and narrower than outer, becoming rigid and ± keeled in fruit, margins entire, apex acute to acuminate; stamens included; anthers purple; pollen white or light yellow; ovary crested; processes 6, prominent, ± triangular, margins entire to notched or shallowly toothed; style linear, equaling stamens; stigma obscurely capitate, scarcely thickened, unlobed; pedicel 10–22 mm. Seed coat dull or shining; cells minutely roughened.
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Type Information

Syntype for Allium atrorubens S. Watson in C. King
Catalog Number: US 34566
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): S. Watson
Year Collected: 1868
Locality: Unionville., Pershing, Nevada, United States, North America
Elevation (m): 1524
  • Syntype: Watson, S. 1871. Rep. U.S. Geol. Explor. Fortieth Par., Bot. 5: 352.
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

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Wikipedia

Allium atrorubens

Allium atrorubens is a species of wild onion known by the common name darkred onion, or dark red onion.

This plant is native to the southwestern United States where it grows in the sandy soils of the Mojave Desert, the Great Basin and higher elevation deserts. It grows from a reddish-brown bulb one to one and a half centimeters wide. The stem is short and is surrounded by few coiled tubular leaves. Atop the stem is an inflorescence of up to 50 flowers. Each flower has six shiny, iridescent, sharply triangular tepals with dark midveins. The tepals are usually magenta to maroon but are lighter pink or white occasionally. Each flower is about a centimeter wide.

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