Overview

Distribution

Allium amplectens is distributed from British Columbia southware through Washington State, Oregon and into California Floristic Province (except for the High Sierra Nevada). Occurrences are below 1800 meters in elevation.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

Supplier: C. Michael Hogan

Trusted

Article rating from 1 person

Average rating: 4.0 of 5

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

B.C.; Calif., Oreg., Wash.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Bulbs 1–15+, increase bulbs absent or ± equaling parent bulbs, never appearing as basal cluster, not clustered on stout primary rhizome, ovoid to ± globose, 0.6–1.5 × 0.6–1.3 cm; outer coats enclosing 1 or more bulbs, brown, prominently cellular-reticulate, membranous, cells in ± vertical rows, forming irregular herringbone pattern, transversely elongate, V-shaped, without fibers; inner coats usually dark red, sometimes white to pink, cells obscure, quadrate. Leaves persistent, withering from tip at anthesis, 2–4, basally sheathing, sheaths not extending much above soil surface; blade solid, subterete or ± channeled, 10–36 cm × 0.5–2 mm, margins entire. Scape persistent, solitary, erect, solid, terete, 15–50 cm × 3–5 mm. Umbel shattering after seeds mature, each flower deciduous with its pedicel as a unit, erect, compact, 10–50-flowered, hemispheric, bulbels unknown; spathe bracts persistent, 2–3, 6–13-veined, ovate, ± equal, apex short-acuminate. Flowers stellate, 5–9 mm; tepals spreading at anthesis, white to pink, lanceolate, ± equal, becoming papery and connivent over capsule, margins entire, apex acute; stamens included; anthers yellow or purple; pollen yellow; ovary crested; processes 6, lateral, ± prominent, ± rectangular, margins entire; style linear, equaling stamens; stigma capitate, scarcely thickened, unlobed; pedicel 4–16 mm. Seed coat dull; cells minutely roughened. 2n = 14, 21, 28.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 1 person

Average rating: 4.0 of 5

Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Allium acuminatum Hooker var. gracile Alph. Wood; A. attenuifolium Kellogg; A. attenuifolium var. monospermum (Jepson) Jepson; A. monospermum Jepson; A. occidentale A. Gray; A. serratum S. Watson
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Type Information

Isotype for Allium amplectens Torr.
Catalog Number: US 34725
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Card file verified by examination of original publication
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): A. Whipple
Year Collected: 1853
Locality: California, United States, North America
  • Isotype: Torrey, J. 1856. Rep. Explor. Railroad Pacific. 4: 148.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Clay soils, including serpentine, dry slopes, and open plains; 0--1800m.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering Apr--Jul.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N3 - Vulnerable

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Allium amplectens

Allium amplectens is a species of wild onion known by the common name narrowleaf onion. It is native to western North America where it grows in woods and especially in clay and serpentine soils. It grows from a pinkish-brown bulb and sends up a naked green stem topped with an inflorescence. When closed the inflorescence is wrapped in bright pink to magenta bracts. It opens to produce between 10 and 50 shiny white to pale pink flowers, each under a centimeter wide. The six stout stamens and the ovary are white or tinted pink or lavender. It is a fairly widespread species.

Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Notes

Comments

All three chromosome races of Allium amplectens are widespread. The triploids are achiasmatic, causing a breakdown in the first meiotic division. This is followed by a normal second division resulting in pollen dyads that are, presumably, nonfunctional; seeds are produced by apomixis. The diploids and tetraploids produce normal pollen, in tetrads, that appears to be functional.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!