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Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: Eastern North Carolina south to northeast Florida and west to Louisiana.

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Plants forming colonies of rosettes, caulescent, arborescent, simple or more often branching. Stems erect, to 5 m. Leaf blade erect or recurving, green or blue-green, lanceolate or sword-shaped, flattened, concave distally, thin, 40–100 × 3.5–6 cm, rigid or flexible, glaucous at least when young, margins entire or roughly and minutely denticulate, often becoming filiferous with straight fibers, yellow or brown, opaque. Inflorescences paniculate, arising partly within to well beyond rosettes, ovoid to ellipsoid, 5–12 × 4.5 dm, glabrous or pubescent; peduncle scapelike, 0.9–1.5 m. Flowers pendent; perianth globose to campanulate; tepals distinct, white to creamy white or greenish white, sometimes tinged with purple, elliptic to narrowly ovate, 4–5 × 2–2.5 cm; filaments ca. 2.6 cm, hispid or slightly papillose; anthers ca. 3.5 mm; pistil light green, ca. 3.6 cm; ovary sessile, ca. 2.8 cm; style ca. 9 mm; stigmas separate; pedicel to 2 cm, often arching. Fruits erect or pendent, baccate, with core, indehiscent, 6-winged or 6-ribbed, elongate, 2.5–8 cm, leathery. Seeds black, lustrous, ovate, thin, 5–8 mm diam. 2n = 50.
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Ecology

Associations

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / spot causer
concentrically arranged colony of Pseudocercospora dematiaceous anamorph of Mycosphaerella deightonii causes spots on dead leaf of Yucca gloriosa

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Yucca gloriosa

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Yucca gloriosa

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 2
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

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Wikipedia

Yucca gloriosa

Yucca gloriosa is an evergreen shrub of the genus Yucca. Common names include Spanish Dagger, Moundlily Yucca, Soft-tipped Yucca, Spanish Bayonet or Sea Islands Yucca.

Contents

Description

Caulescent, 0.5-2.5 m tall, usually with several stems from the base, base thickened in adult specimens, branched above, rhizomatous, leaves straight, very stiff, 0.3-0.5 m long, 2-3.5 cm wide, dark green, light grey-green, margins entire, smooth, rarely fine denticulate, acuminate, with a sharp, brown, terminal spine, underside smooth. Inflorescence paniculate, 0.6-1.5 m tall, partially inferior to the leaves, flowers campanulate to elongate, numerous, pendulous, white, sometimes tinged purple or red, 3.5 cm long, fruits green, when ripe brownish, indehiscent, 5–8 cm long, 2.5 cm wide, obovate, seeds black, thickened. Yucca gloriosa grows on sand dunes along the coast and barrier islands of the southeastern USA, often together with Yucca aloifolia and Yucca recurvifolia. In contrast to Y. recurvifolia, the leaves of Y. gloriosa are hard stiff, erect and narrower. On the other hand, Y. aloifolia has leaves with denticulate margins and a sharp-pointed, terminal spine. The flowering period is the end of summer and autumn whereas Y. recurvifolia blooms in spring.

In collections in Europe and overseas, there are many forms and hybrids (Sprenger, Förster) from the 18th and 19th centuries. The following names have been used for material of uncertain origin in the European garden flora.

  • Yucca gloriosa var. minor Carr.
  • Yucca gloriosa var. obliqua Baker
  • Yucca gloriosa f. obliqua (Harworth)Voss
  • Yucca gloriosa f. acuminata (Sweet)Voss
  • Yucca gloriosa f. pruinosa (Baker)Voss
  • Yucca gloriosa f. tortulata (Baker)Voss
  • Yucca gloriosa' var. medio-striata Planchon
  • Yucca gloriosa var. robusta Carr.
  • Yucca gloriosa var. nobilis Carr.
  • Yucca gloriosa f. planifolia Engelmann
  • Yucca gloriosa var. plicata Engelmann
  • Yucca gloriosa var. genuina Engelmann
  • Yucca gloriosa var. flexilis Trelease
  • Yucca gloriosa var. plicata Carr.
  • Yucca gloriosa var. superba Baker
  • Yucca gloriosa var. longifolia Carr.
  • Yucca gloriosa var. muculata Carr.
  • Yucca pendula Sieber ex Carr.
  • Yucca pattens Andre
  • Yucca pruinosa Baker

The plant is known to grow to heights above 5 m (16 feet).[1]

Distribution

Yucca gloriosa is native to the coast and barrier islands of southeastern North America, growing on sand dunes. It ranges from southern North Carolina south to northern Florida. It is associated with Yucca filamentosa, Yucca aloifolia, and Opuntia species.

Cultivation

The plant is known to thrive as a domestic plant [2] and is sold internationally. In a domestic environment, the plant has average water requirements, and little maintenance is needed other than the removal of dead leaves when the shrub nears its ultimate height.[3] The plant is very hardy, no leaf damage at −20 degree Celsius (−5 °F), also it is very robust and can handle a lot of snow and prolonged freeze.

Properties

The Spanish Dagger has been known to cause skin irritation and even allergic reactions upon contact. The leaf points are even sharp enough to break the skin.[4]

References

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Notes

Comments

Yucca gloriosa has a growth habit similar to that of Y. aloifolia, except that the former appears more moundlike due to the terminal branching mode, whereas the latter appears more open because the branching is more median on the trunk.
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