Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: Occurs from upper Rio Grande plains and Edwards plateau to Trans Pecos Texas. Occurs in Grant, Dona Ana, Otero and Eddy counties of NM. (W. Texas, S. New Mexico, N. Mexico

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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Tex.; Mexico (Chihuahua, Coahuila).
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Plants solitary, erect, arborescent, 2.5–6.9 m, including inflorescence. Stems 1, simple or with 2–4 branches, to 5.1 m, average diam. 32 cm. Leaf blade erect, yellowish green, 43–115 × 3.1–8.4 cm, rigid, smooth, glabrous, margins conspicuous, curling, filiferous, brown. Inflorescences erect, paniculate, often with proximal branches arising beyond rosettes, broadly ovoid, 5.5–25.5 dm, glabrous; peduncle 0.3–0.6 m. Flowers pendent, 4.4–12.4 cm; perianth campanulate; tepals connate basally into floral cup 1–32 mm, white to greenish white, ovate, 3.9–10.8 cm; filaments averaging 2.2 cm from base of tepals, glabrous; anthers 1–6 mm; pistil 2.8–8 × 0.7 cm; ovary ca. 4.5–5 times longer than wide; style 4.5 mm; stigmas distinct. Fruits pendent, baccate, indehiscent, elongate, 3.6–13.6 × 1.8 –3.6 cm, fleshy, succulent. Seeds black, 7.7 mm diam., 2.9 mm thick, smooth.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Samuela faxoniana Trelease; Yucca australis Trelease 1893, not (Engelmann) Trelease 1902; Y. macrocarpa Coville 1893, not Engelmann 1881
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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Dry plains and hills, 3000-4500'. Usually thinly scattered on grassy and chaparral mesas and slopes.

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Rocky slopes, flat plains; 800--2100m.
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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 81 to >300

Comments: Extant throughout S. New Mexico and N. Texas

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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering late winter--spring.
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

Reasons: Known from west Texas, southern New Mexico and northern Mexico. Usually found in small numbers, but potentially many populations.

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National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

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Threats

Comments: Collection pressure on WSMR and off.

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Wikipedia

Yucca torreyi

Yucca torreyi is an evergreen shrub of the genus Yucca, known by the common names Spanish-dagger,[1] Torrey's yucca,[1] or Torrey Yucca.

Yucca torreyi is native to the Chihuahuan Desert region of northern Mexico, southern New Mexico, and southwestern Texas. Its range is centered around Big Bend National Park in the Rio Grande valley, the northernmost regions of the Chihuahuan Desert; it does not occur into the Rio Grande of central New Mexico, nor the lower third of the Rio Grande Valley. It is found mainly in the Mexican states of Chihuahua and Coahuila, but also minor locales of Durango and Nuevo León.[1][2]

The Torrey Yucca is named for John Torrey, an American botanist of the 19th century.

References

  1. ^ a b c d Species was originally described and published in North American Trees 157, fig. 117. 1908. Britton, N.L., Shafer, J.A. GRIN (February 15, 2007). "Yucca torreyi information from NPGS/GRIN". Taxonomy for Plants. National Germplasm Resources Laboratory, Beltsville, Maryland: USDA, ARS, National Genetic Resources Program. http://www.ars-grin.gov/cgi-bin/npgs/html/taxon.pl?316866. Retrieved August 6, 2010. 
  2. ^ Little. Atlas of United States Trees, Volume 3, Minor Western Hardwoods, Map 209, Yucca torreyi.
  • Little. Atlas of United States Trees, Volume 3, Minor Western Hardwoods, Little, Elbert L, 1976, US Government Printing Office. Library of Congress No. 79-653298. Map 209, Yucca torreyi.
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Notes

Comments

Trelease described the genus Samuela based on two species, Samuela faxoniana and S. carnerosana. K. H. Clary’s DNA study (1997) shows them to be closely related but genetically distinct.  

 Yucca faxoniana is often used for landscaping in arid and semiarid regions of Texas and New Mexico.

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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: GRANK (G4) assigned by NMHP.

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