Overview

Distribution

Range Description

Posidonia coriacea is endemic to western and southern Australia, ranging from the tip of North West Cape, Western Australia, to Beachport, South Australia.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
The P. ostenfeldii complex typically form patchy meadows with mixed species in open ocean or rough water sublittoral habitats (Cambridge 1975). They are characterised by their long, thick, leathery leaves and long leaf sheaths that are deeply buried. These characters appear to be associated with strong wave movement and mobile sand substratum typical of the environments in which they are found ( Kuo and Cambridge 1984).

Campey et al. (2000) implies that vegetative morphological characters, upon which five species of the P. ostenfeldii complex were erected, are not effective for the identification of species from multiple samples from any one location.

Systems
  • Marine
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2010

Assessor/s
Short, F.T., Carruthers, T.J.R., Waycott, M., Kendrick, G.A., Fourqurean, J.W., Callabine, A., Kenworthy, W.J. & Dennison, W.C.

Reviewer/s
Livingstone, S., Harwell, H. & Carpenter, K.E.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species is widespread in western and southern Australia and has some localized threats. However the population overall is stable. This species is listed as Least Concern.
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Population

Population
There are local examples of declines due to human disturbance for P. coriacea, however the population overall is stable.

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Major Threats
The main area of disturbance is due to sand mining offshore from south of Perth. Other localized threats may include coastal development by industry, pipelines, communication cables, mining and dredging. Pollution from eutrophication causing seagrass overgrowth and smothering of epiphytes, aquaculture, farming and direct physical damage by recreational and commercial boating activities (Green and Short 2003).
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
It is recommended that the whole P. ostenfeldii complex be reanalyzed and that further morphological and genetic work be carried out (Campey et al. 2000).
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Wikipedia

Posidonia coriacea

Posidonia coriacea is a species of seagrass that occurs in the southern waters of Australia.

Description[edit source | edit]

A species of Posidonia. A perennial rhizomatous herb that appears as stands in marine habitat. This species is found at depths from 1 to 30 metres on white sands, in areas subject to intense wave action. The leaf blades are 2.5 to 7 millimetres wide, and 1.25 metres long. Two or three leaves, with large bases, appear from each shoot. They are leathery and thickened convexly on the upper and lower surfaces. Between 7 and 11 veins appear on each leaf. The leaf sheath breaks into strips, rather than the fibrous detritus of similar species. The flowering period is primarily during the months of August and September.

Distribution[edit source | edit]

Posidonia coriacea is recorded at Shark Bay, Western Australia, around coasts of Southwest Australia, and across the Bight to South Australia.

Taxonomy[edit source | edit]

This species is contained by the Posidoniaceae family, one of eight occurring in southern Australia. The ninth member, Posidonia oceanica, is found in the mediterranean sea. Several related species within Posidonia are described as the Posidonia ostenfeldii complex.

References[edit source | edit]

  1. ^ Short, F.T., Carruthers, T.J.R., Waycott, M., Kendrick, G.A., Fourqurean, J.W., Callabine, A., Kenworthy, W.J. & Dennison, W.C. 2010. Posidonia coriacea. In: IUCN 2012. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2012.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 9 January 2013.
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