Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Annuals or perennials. Inflorescence a panicle. Spikelets with 2-several florets; glumes ± unequal, keeled, 1-3-nerved, unawned; lemmas 5-7-veined, unawned, keeled, laterally flattened, with a hyaline margin (in ours).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Type Information

Isotype for Briza monandra var. condensata Standl.
Catalog Number: US 1161475
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): J. F. Macbride & W. Featherstone
Year Collected: 1922
Locality: Huarón, Pasco, Peru, South America
Elevation (m): 4267 to 4267
  • Isotype: Standley, P. C. 1931. Field Mus. Nat. Hist., Bot. Ser. 8: 298.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Associations

Foodplant / saprobe
erect ascocarp of Acrospermum graminum is saprobic on dead stem of Poa
Other: major host/prey

Plant / resting place / on
puparium of Agromyza albipennis may be found on leaf (near end of mine) of Poa
Other: minor host/prey

Foodplant / miner
larva of Agromyza nigrella mines leaf of Poa

Foodplant / miner
solitary larva of Agromyza rondensis mines leaf of Poa

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / spot causer
gregarious, with smoky-brown pore pycnidium of Ascochyta coelomycetous anamorph of Ascochyta graminicola causes spots on fading leaf of Poa
Remarks: season: late summer

Foodplant / spot causer
pycnidium of Actinothyrium coelomycetous anamorph of Ascochyta leptospora causes spots on leaf of Poa

Foodplant / parasite
cleistothecium of Blumeria graminis parasitises live sheath of Poa
Remarks: season: 7-10

Foodplant / saprobe
immersed pseudothecium of Botryosphaeria festucae is saprobic on dead leaf of Poa
Remarks: season: 6-8

Foodplant / miner
larva of Cerodontha crassiseta mines leaf of Poa

Plant / resting place / within
puparium of Chromatomyia milii may be found in leaf-mine of Poa
Other: major host/prey

Plant / resting place / within
puparium of Chromatomyia nigra may be found in leaf-mine of Poa

Foodplant / feeds on
pycnidium of Ascochyta coelomycetous anamorph of Didymella phleina feeds on Poa

Foodplant / open feeder
larva of Dolerus haematodes grazes on leaf of Poa

Foodplant / parasite
sorus of Entyloma dactylidis parasitises live leaf of Poa
Other: minor host/prey

Foodplant / gall
stroma of Epichlo causes gall of stem of Poa
Remarks: season: fertile in 8

Foodplant / open feeder
larva of Eutomostethus ephippium grazes on leaf of Poa

Foodplant / pathogen
colony of Fusarium anamorph of Fusarium poae infects and damages ear of Poa

Foodplant / spot causer
acervulus of Colletotrichum coelomycetous anamorph of Glomerella graminicola causes spots on dead stem of Poa
Other: minor host/prey

Foodplant / saprobe
scattered, initially immersed pseudothecium of Leptosphaeria culmifraga is saprobic on dead stem of Poa
Remarks: season: spring, summer

Foodplant / pathogen
pycnidium of Dilophospora coelomycetous anamorph of Lidophia graminis infects and damages live inflorescence of Poa
Remarks: season: 5-10, esp. 7

Foodplant / parasite
Ligniera junci parasitises live root hair of Poa

Plant / resting place / on
puparium of Liriomyza flaveola may be found on leaf of Poa
Other: major host/prey

Foodplant / saprobe
sessile apothecium of Mollisia poaeoides is saprobic on dead culm of Poa
Remarks: season: 11-2

Foodplant / spot causer
crowded, arranged in rows or scattered, immersed, minute, fuscous pycnidium of Septoria coelomycetous anamorph of Mycosphaerella graminicola causes spots on live leaf of Poa
Remarks: season: summer

Foodplant / open feeder
larva of Pachynematus obductus grazes on leaf of Poa
Other: major host/prey

Foodplant / saprobe
scattered, initially immersed pycnidium of Septoria anamorph of Phaeosphaeria nodorum is saprobic on dead stem (esp node) of Poa
Remarks: season: spring, summer

Foodplant / saprobe
superficial conidioma of Dinemasporium coelomycetous anamorph of Phomatospora dinemasporium is saprobic on dead sheath of Poa
Remarks: season: 1-12

Foodplant / internal feeder
larva of Pseudonapomyza atra feeds within leaf of Poa
Other: major host/prey

Foodplant / spot causer
immersed, crowded or in rows pycnidium of Pseudoseptoria coelomycetous anamorph of Pseudoseptoria donacis causes spots on sheath of Poa
Remarks: season: 5-7

Foodplant / spot causer
immersed, thin, subcuticular stromatic plates of Rhynchosporium coelomycetous anamorph of Rhynchosporium orthosporum causes spots on live sheath of Poa

Foodplant / spot causer
immersed stromatic of Rhynchosporium coelomycetous anamorph of Rhynchosporium secalis causes spots on live sheath of Poa

Foodplant / open feeder
larva of Selandria serva grazes on leaf of Poa
Other: major host/prey

Foodplant / parasite
Sorosphaeria radicalis parasitises live root hair of Poa

Foodplant / pathogen
immersed stroma of Pseudocercosporella dematiaceous anamorph of Tapesia yallundae infects and damages live stem of Poa

Foodplant / gall
Tylenchus devastatrix causes gall of stem of Poa

Foodplant / parasite
embedded sorus of Urocystis poae parasitises live sheath of Poa

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Poa cf. cucullata

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records: 1164
Specimens with Sequences: 2002
Specimens with Barcodes: 1491
Species: 257
Species With Barcodes: 202
Public Records: 334
Public Species: 54
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Barcode data

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Poa

Not to be confused with Poá.
For other uses, see POA (disambiguation).
"Bluegrass": The seed pods go from green to purplish blue to brown. During the purplish blue phase the seed stems have a navy blue coating.
rough meadow-grass (Poa trivialis), showing the ligule structure

Poa[1] is a genus of about 500 species of grasses, native to the temperate regions of both hemispheres. Common names include meadow-grass (mainly Europe and Asia), bluegrass (mainly North America), tussock (some New Zealand species), and speargrass. "Poa" is Greek for fodder. Poa are members of the Pooideae subfamily of the Poaceae family.

Bluegrass, which has green leaves, derives its name from the seed heads, which are blue when the plant is allowed to grow to its natural height of two to three feet (0.6 to 0.9 meters).[2] Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis) is the type species of the family Poaceae.

The genus Poa includes both annual and perennial species. Most are monoecious, but a few are dioecious (separate male and female plants). The leaves are narrow, folded or flat, sometimes bristled, and with the basal sheath flattened or sometimes thickened, with a blunt or hooded apex and membranaceous ligule.

Cultivation and uses[edit]

Many of the species are important pasture plants, used extensively by grazing livestock. Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis) is the most extensively used cool-season grass used in lawns, sports fields, and golf courses in the United States.[3] Annual bluegrass (Poa annua) can sometimes be considered a weed.[4]

According to Galen, the roots of certain species are good for treating fresh wounds and bleeding. In the sixteenth century, Poa grasses were used for inflammation of the kidney.[5]

Some of the Poa species are popular for gardens and for landscaping in New Zealand.

Insect foodplant[edit]

See also List of Lepidoptera that feed on grasses

Lepidoptera whose caterpillars feed on Poa include:

Species[edit]

Species include:

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ From Greek πόα "grass, meadow."
  2. ^ What Makes Kentucky's Bluegrass Blue. New York Times. June 3, 1993.]
  3. ^ Dvorchak, Robert (June 13, 2007). "Oakmont-inspired Stimpmeter allows USGA to accurately measure speed, consistency of putting surfaces". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved 2007-09-08. 
  4. ^ Ohlendorf, B.; D. W. Cudney, Botany and Plant Sciences, UC Riverside; C. L. Elmore, Vegetable Crops/Weed Science, UC Davis; and V. A. Gibeault, Botany and Plant Sciences, UC Riverside (April 2003). "Annual Bluegrass Management Guidelines--UC IPM". University of California. Retrieved 2007-09-08. 
  5. ^ Gerarde, John (1597). "The Herball or Generall Historie Of Plantes". Retrieved 2009-01-11. 
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!