Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is endemic to the Solomon Islands. The extent of its occupancy is most likely to be fragmented around major cities, and also due to the inputs of pollution from gold and mineral mining (www.state.gov).
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species is found in loose rocks and pebbles in shallow waters ranging from 5 to 15 metres (www.topseashells.com).

Systems
  • Marine
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
DD
Data Deficient

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
Peters, H.

Reviewer/s
Scott, J.A.

Contributor/s
Kohn, A., Poppe, G. & Bouchet, P.

Justification
This species is endemic to the Solomon Islands, however these islands have a large coastal area along which the species could occur. The population may be fragmented due to it being a shallow water species and therefore easy to access by tourists. This statement is further supported as there is a large diving industry in the area which is expanding. There may also be a threat from pollution due to the mineral mining in the area. This species' distribution is uncertain but it is probably highly fragmented with an AOO of possibly less than 2,000 km2. Its presence in MPAs is also uncertain. In view of this it is listed as Data Deficient.
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Population

Population
There are no population records for this species in the literature.
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Threats

Major Threats
The main threats to this species are the expanding tourism and diving industry, and also inputs of pollution from mining for minerals. This species is particularly threatened by tourism collection due to high levels of diving around the main island of Guadalcanal as well as some of the other islands (www.state.gov).
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are several marine protected areas in the Solomon Islands in which the species could occur. One is the marine conservation area around the Arnavon islands, which has a total area of 82.70 km² and has been designated since 1995 (www.mpaglobal.org).
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Wikipedia

Conus solomonensis

Conus solomonensis is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Conidae, the cone snails and their allies.[1][2]

Like all species within the genus Conus, these snails are predatory and venomous. They are capable of "stinging" humans, therefore live ones should be handled carefully or not at all.

Description[edit]

Distribution[edit]

Conus solomonensis occurs in the Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea. The type locality is situated west of Honiara, Guadalcanal, Solomons.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Conus solomonensis Delsaerdt, 1992.  Retrieved through: World Register of Marine Species on 27 March 2010.
  2. ^ a b R. M. Filmer (2011). "Taxonomic revision of the Conus spectrum, Conus stramineus and Conus collisus complexes (Gastropoda - Conidae). Part II: The Conus stramineus complex". Visaya 3 (4): 4–66. 
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