Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species occurs from Djibouti to South Somalia in the Gulf of Aden to Mogadishu (Röckel et al. 1995), a coastline of approx 3,300 km. The AOO and number of locations exceed the thresholds for criteria B1 and B2.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species occurs at depths between 50 and 150 m. However, this might have been reported in error, and the species may in fact occur in much shallower waters, similar to other species in the group Lilliconus (G. Raybaudi pers. comm. October 2011). Adults of the species are small and will grow to approx 13 mm although they will typically be less than this (Röckel et al. 1995). This is the largest species in the group Lilliconus. It occurs in good densities, more commonly found together than other Conus species, suggesting they probably live in colonies (G. Raybaudi pers. comm. October 2011).

As with all the Lilliconus known to date, this species has lecithotrophic larval development as inferred from the protoconch (G. Raybaudi pers. comm. October 2011).

Systems
  • Marine
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
Raybaudi-Massilia, G.

Reviewer/s
Peters, H. & Veldsman, S.G.

Contributor/s

Justification

This species occurs from Djibouti to South Somalia in the Gulf of Aden to Mogadishu. It occupies an area of great political instability which is dangerous to visit, which may provide protection from gathering. As a small species (13 mm, max), it is likely to be of interest only to serious collectors and is probably not at risk from collection threat.

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Population

Population
There is no population information available for this species.
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Threats

Major Threats

The waters of Djibouti and Somalia are under similar threats to those being experienced in the entire Red Sea area. These being threats derived from sewage discharges, shipping and associated spills and pollution, with pressures particularly high around the capital city of Djibouti. Shipping is an important commercial sector as Djibouti is the major harbour for Ethiopia. Anchor, boating and tourism damage is increasing, with little increase in environmental awareness. International tourism is just developing and damage so far is limited. There is low level subsistence fishing and limited exploitation of fish for live export but aquarium fish collecting is increasing (UNEP 1997, Maghsoudlou et al. 2008).

There are insufficient data to determine the abundance of this species or the threats it faces, if any. Political instability in much of its range makes it impossible to determine levels of offtake or changes in habitat.

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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
This species is very scarce in the market and would benefit from further research into populations, habitat, and threats before any action plan can be formulated. There are no known conservation measures currently in place for this species.
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Wikipedia

Conus korni

Conus korni is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Conidae, the cone snails and their allies.[1]

Like all species within the genus Conus, these snails are predatory and venomous. They are capable of "stinging" humans, therefore live ones should be handled carefully or not at all.

Contents

Description

Distribution

References

  1. ^ Conus korni G. Raybaudi Massilia, 1993.  Retrieved through: World Register of Marine Species on 27 March 2010.
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