Overview

Distribution

occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Global Range: (>2,500,000 square km (greater than 1,000,000 square miles)) At least Vermont (Richardson, 2008) to British Columbia south to Florida, Texas, and the mountains of northern Arizona (Schmidt and Jacobson, 2005). The distribution westward is a bit uncertain due to confusion with B. nevadensis, but B. auricomus is or was statewide as far west as Nebraska--one of several places they overlap. B. auricomus probably replaces B. nevadensis completely east of the Mississippi River. Mitchell (1962) reported the eastern range as Minnesota to New York and Georgia.

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Ecology

Associations

Flowering Plants Visited by Bombus auricomus in Illinois

Bombus auricomus Robertson: Apidae (Bombini), Hymenoptera
(observations are from Robertson, Graenicher, Reed, Betz et al., Haddock & Chaplin, Clinebell & Bernhardt, and Macior)

Anacardiaceae: Rhus glabra [pist sn] (Rb); Apiaceae: Cicuta maculata sn (Rb), Zizia aurea sn (Rb); Asclepiadaceae: Asclepias incarnata [plpr sn fq] (Rb, Btz), Asclepias sullivanti [plpr sn] (Rb), Asclepias syriaca [plab sn] (Rb); Asteraceae: Achillea millefolium cp (Rb), Aster pilosus sn (Rb), Aster turbinellus sn (Rb), Bidens aristosa sn (Rb), Cirsium altissimum sn cp (Rb, Gr), Cirsium discolor sn cp fq (Rb, Re), Cirsium vulgare sn (Rb), Echinacea pallida sn (Rb), Echinacea purpurea sn (Rb), Eupatoriadelphus purpureus sn (Rb), Helianthus grosseserratus sn (Rb), Helianthus tuberosus sn (Rb), Lactuca floridana sn (Rb), Liatris aspera (Re), Liatris spicata sn cp (Gr), Oligoneuron rigidum (Re), Ratibida pinnata (Re), Rudbeckia triloba sn (Rb), Solidago nemoralis sn (Rb), Solidago speciosa sn (Rb), Verbesina helianthoides sn (Rb), Vernonia fasciculata sn (Rb); Boraginaceae: Mertensia virginica sn (Rb); Brassicaceae: Cardamine bulbosa sn (Rb); Caesalpiniaceae: Chamaecrista fasciculata [flwr cp fq] (Rb); Campanulaceae: Lobelia siphilitica (Mc); Commelinaceae: Tradescantia virginiensis cp (Rb); Convolvulaceae: Ipomoea pandurata sn fq (Rb); Cornaceae: Cornus racemosa cp (Rb); Ebenaceae: Diospyros virginiana [pist sn] (Rb); Fabaceae: Astragalus canadensis sn cp fq (Rb), Astragalus crassicarpus trichocalyx sn cp (Rb), Baptisia leucophaea (HC), Cercis canadensis sn fq (Rb), Dalea candida sn (Rb), Dalea purpurea sn cp (Rb, Re), Desmodium illinoense cp (Rb), Melilotus alba sn (Rb), Orbexilum onobrychis sn (Rb), Robinia pseudoacacia sn fq (Rb), Trifolium pratense sn (Rb, Mc); Fumariaceae: Dicentra cucullaria sn fq (Rb); Grossulariaceae: Ribes missouriense sn fq (Rb); Hippocastanaceae: Aesculus glabra sn fq (Rb), Aesculus hippocastanum sn fq (Rb); Hydrophyllaceae: Hydrophyllum appendiculatum sn (Rb); Hypericaceae: Hypericum sphaerocarpum cp (Rb); Iridaceae: Iris versicolor shrevei sn (Rb), Sisyrinchium angustifolium sn (Rb); Lamiaceae: Agastache scrophulariaefolia cp (Rb), Blephilia ciliata sn cp (Rb), Blephilia hirsuta sn (Rb), Leonurus cardiaca sn (Rb), Monarda bradburiana sn fq (Rb), Monarda fistulosa sn fq (Rb, Re), Nepeta cataria sn (Rb), Pycnanthemum tenuifolium sn cp fq icp (Rb), Pycnanthemum virginianum (Re), Scutellaria incana sn (Rb), Stachys palustris sn (Rb); Liliaceae: Camassia scilloides sn (Rb); Malvaceae: Hibiscus trionum sn (Rb), Malva neglecta sn (Rb); Oxalidaceae: Oxalis violacea sn (Rb); Polemoniaceae: Phlox pilosa sn fq (Rb), Polemonium reptans sn (Rb); Portulacaceae: Claytonia virginica sn (Rb); Primulaceae: Dodecatheon meadia cp exp (Rb, Mc); Ranunculaceae: Aquilegia canadensis sn (Mc), Clematis pitcheri sn cp (Rb), Delphinium carolinianum virescens (Re), Delphinium tricorne sn fq (Rb, Mc); Rhamnaceae: Ceanothus americanus cp (Rb); Rosaceae: Crataegus crus-galli sn (Rb), Malus coronaria sn (Rb), Rosa setigera cp (Rb), Rubus allegheniensis sn (Rb); Rubiaceae: Cephalanthus occidentalis sn fq (Rb); Rutaceae: Ptelea trifoliata sn cp (Rb); Salicaceae: Salix interior [stam sn] (Rb); Scrophulariaceae: Aureolaria grandiflora cp (Rb), Collinsia verna sn (Rb), Linaria vulgaris fq (Mc), Pedicularis canadensis sn cp fq (Mc), Penstemon cobaea cobaea sn (CB), Penstemon digitalis sn (Rb), Penstemon grandiflorus (Re), Penstemon hirsutus sn fq (Rb), Penstemon pallidus sn (CB), Tomanthera auriculata sn (Rb); Verbenaceae: Verbena hastata sn (Rb), Verbena stricta sn (Rb); Violaceae: Viola striata sn np (Rb)

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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: > 300

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Global Abundance

Unknown

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Bombus auricomus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 3
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

Reasons: As far as is known, this is still a common and widespread bumble bee, especially in the western parts of its range. No species of this subgenus are reported to be declining. A conservation status rank of G5 is probably the appropriate rank, but given declines of other bumblebees and pollinators in general, and pending a more thorough evaluation, G4G5 is suggested for now.

Intrinsic Vulnerability: Not intrinsically vulnerable

Environmental Specificity: Broad. Generalist or community with all key requirements common.

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Global Short Term Trend: Relatively stable (=10% change)

Comments: May be declining in Vermont (Richardson, 2008), but this generally more western bee may be naturally uncommon in that peripheral area as it is in Ontario (current rank is S2S3). Otherwise no reports of decline. Still very common in South Dakota (Johnson, 2009) and has not declined much in Illinois (Grixti et al. (2009).

Global Long Term Trend: Decline of 30-50%

Comments: Obviously some habitat loss.

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Threats

Degree of Threat: Medium

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Management

Global Protection: Very many (>40) occurrences appropriately protected and managed

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Wikipedia

Bombus auricomus

Distribution of the Bombus auricomus

The black-and-gold bumblebee[2] (Bombus auricomus) is a North American bumblebee of the family Apidae. Its range includes eastern and central North America, east to the Rocky Mountains.[2] It is treated as conspecific with the Nevada bumblebee (Bombus nevadensis).[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Bombus auricomus (Robertson, 1903)". Biolib.cz. Retrieved 3 July 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c Black-and-gold Bumble Bee, BugGuide


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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Subgenus: Bombias

B. nevadensis and B. auricomus have been regarded as both as conspecific (e.g. LaBerge and Webb 1962, Milliron 1971, Thorp et al. 1983, Laverty and Harder 1988) and as separate species (e.g. Franklin 1913, Rasmont 1988, Scholl, Thorp, Owen and Obrecht 1992, Poole 1996, Williams 2008). They are treated here as separate following Williams (2008) and Cameron et al. (2007), although more study is needed. Scholl et al. (1992) point out that supposed intergrades are based solely on coat color and they propose an alternate explanation of convergence (or Mullerian Mimicry) in overlap areas. They report that electrophoretic enzyme studies from the supposed intergrade areas indicate distinct species status. Similarly Golik and Ellis (2006) report no intergrades in Nebraska even based on coat color.

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