Overview

Distribution

Range Description

Patagioenas caribaea is found throughout the wetter areas of Jamaica, but most notably in Cockpit Country, and the Blue and John Crow Mountains. It has been greatly reduced in numbers and range since the mid-19th century, however, it is highly seasonal in its use of foraging habitats and in flocking patterns, which makes trends difficult to track without systematic monitoring (Koenig in litt. 2007).

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Range

Jamaica.

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It inhabits relatively undisturbed humid forest and woodland, and wet limestone forest, at elevations of 100-2,000 m. It breeds mostly in the highlands in spring and summer (from late February to August), occurring locally to sea-level on the wetter, north side of the island (Raffaele et al. 1998, BirdLife Jamaica in litt. 1998, 2000). Some birds move to lower altitudes at certain times, but these movements are poorly understood (BirdLife Jamaica in litt. 1998, 2000). It feeds in small flocks on fruits and seeds high in the canopy, and large flocks are sometimes seen moving to different feeding locations (Raffaele et al. 1998, BirdLife Jamaica in litt. 1998, 2000). The nest is constructed high in a tall tree.


Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
VU
Vulnerable

Red List Criteria
B1ab(i,ii,iii,v);C2a(ii)

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
BirdLife International

Reviewer/s
Butchart, S. & Symes, A.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species is classified as Vulnerable because anecdotal evidence and the many threats it faces indicate that the range and population must now be small, fragmented and declining.

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Population

Population
The population is estimated to number 2,500-9,999 mature individuals based on an assessment of known records, descriptions of abundance and range size. This is consistent with recorded population density estimates for congeners or close relatives with a similar body size, and the fact that only a proportion of the estimated Extent of Occurrence is likely to be occupied. This estimate is equivalent to 3,750-14,999 individuals, rounded here to 3,500-15,000 individuals.

Population Trend
Decreasing
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Threats

Major Threats
Unabating pressure from illegal hunting, logging and clearance for plantation agriculture is responsible for this species's ongoing decline (BirdLife Jamaica in litt. 1998, 2000). However, the potential for bauxite mining in Cockpit Country is the currently the most important threat for the important populations in west-central Jamaica (Koenig in litt. 2007).

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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Conservation Actions Underway
It is legally protected, but this is not enforced. Habitat in the Blue and John Crow Mountains has been declared a national park, but there is little enforcement or management (BirdLife Jamaica in litt. 1998, 2000). Funding is actively being sought for conservation in Cockpit Country (BirdLife Jamaica in litt. 1998, 2000) and current efforts are being directed to supporting Forestry Department and community-based Local Forest Management Committees to protect the Forest Reserves and private buffer lands in the Cockpit Country Conservation Area (Koenig in litt. 2007). There is an on-going, high profile public awareness campaign to prevent bauxite mining in Cockpit Country; Cockpit Country Stakeholders Group and Local Forest Management Committees are engaged in the process of voicing opposition to mining and having the area declared "closed to mining" by Minister's Discretion (Koenig in litt. 2007).

Conservation Actions Proposed
Survey to assess numbers and precise distribution. Prevent bauxite mining in Cockpit Country by declaring the area "closed to mining". Maintain corridors linking highland forests and lowland areas (BirdLife Jamaica in litt. 1998, 2000). Enforce legal protection. Ensure de facto protection of the national park in the Blue and John Crow Mountains (BirdLife Jamaica in litt. 1998, 2000).

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Wikipedia

Ring-tailed pigeon

The ring-tailed pigeon (Patagioenas caribaea) is a species of bird in the Columbidae family. It is endemic to Jamaica.

Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.

References[edit]

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