Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Trees to 25 m tall; trunk to 1 m d.b.h.; bark pale gray, aging dull gray, smooth when young, furrowed with age into scaly plates; crown conical; 1st-year branchlets initially green, aging yellow-brown, densely pale yellow pubescent; winter buds ovoid, not resinous. Needles 5 per bundle, slightly curved, triangular in cross section, 3.5-5.5 cm × 0.7-0.9 mm, stomatal lines present along abaxial surfaces, white, vascular bundle 1, base with sheath shed. Seed cones subsessile, ovoid or ovoid-ellipsoid, 4-7.5 × 3.5-4.5 cm. Seed scales obovate-rhombic or oblong-obovate, 2-3 × 1.8-2 cm; apophyses pale brown or dull gray-brown, almost rhombic; umbo terminal, sunken, margin recurved distally. Seeds nearly brown, mottled with black, irregularly obovoid, 8-10 × ca. 7 mm; wing ca. 1 cm.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
Pinus parviflora occurs at altitudes from just above sea level to about 2,500 m, with an optimum between 1,000 and 1,500 m a.s.l. in montane forests. It is found in both pure and mixed stands with other conifers and also with angiosperms, usually on steep slopes, dry sites or rocky ridges. At high, subalpine habitats this species becomes dwarfed and some of the cultivated forms may have been derived from such provenances.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Habitat & Distribution

Widely cultivated in cities in the Chang Jiang basin and Shandong [native to Japan]
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Associations

Foodplant / parasite
erumpent aecium of Cronartium ribicola parasitises stem of Pinus parviflora
Remarks: season: 3-6

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Pinus parviflora

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Pinus parviflora

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 7
Specimens with Barcodes: 22
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
Farjon, A.

Reviewer/s
Thomas, P.

Contributor/s

Justification
This common and widespread species is not threatened with extinction and hence listed as Least Concern.
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Population

Population
Widespread and locally common.

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Major Threats
No specific current threats have been identified for this species.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Present in several protected areas.
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Wikipedia

Japanese white pine

Pinus parviflora, or Japanese white pine, is a pine in the white pine group, Pinus subgenus Strobus, native to Japan. It is also known as the Japanese five-needle pine (Pinus pentaphylla).

It is a coniferous evergreen tree, growing to 15–25 m in height and is usually as broad as it is tall, forming a wide, dense, conical crown. The leaves are needle-like, in bundles of five, with a length of 5–6 cm. The cones are 4–7 cm long, with broad, rounded scales; the seeds are 8–11 mm long, with a vestigial 2–10 mm wing.

This is a popular tree for bonsai, and is also grown as an ornamental tree in parks and gardens. The [cultivar] 'Adcock's dwarf' has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.[1]

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References[edit]

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Notes

Comments

Commonly used as a garden tree or for bonsai.
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