The following bibliography has been generated by bringing together all references provided by our content partners. There may be duplication.

References

  • Arboretum et Fruticetum Britannicum 4: 2292, f. 2210, 2211. 1838. (Arbor. Frutic. Brit.)
  • Bean, W.J. 1980. Trees and shrubs hardy in the British Isles, ed. 8, Vols. 1-4. John Murray, London
  • Burns, Russell M., and Barbara H. Honkala, technical coordinators. 1990. Silvics of North America: 1. Conifers; 2. Hardwoods.   Agriculture Handbook 654 (Supersedes Agriculture Handbook 271,Silvics of Forest Trees of the United States, 1965).   U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Washington, DC. vol.2, 877 pp.   http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/silvics_manual/table_of_contents.htm External link.
  • CONABIO. 2009. Catálogo taxonómico de especies de México. 1. In Capital Nat. México. CONABIO, Mexico City.
  • Cody, W. J. 1996. Fl. Yukon Terr. i–xvii, 1–669. NRC Research Press, Ottawa.
  • Douglas ex Loudon. 1838. In: Arbor. Frut. Brit. 4: 2292.
  • Farjon A. (2013). Conifer Database (version Jul 2011). In: Species 2000 & ITIS Catalogue of Life, 11th March 2013 (Roskov Y., Kunze T., Paglinawan L., Orrell T., Nicolson D., Culham A., Bailly N., Kirk P., Bourgoin T., Baillargeon G., Hernandez F., De Wever A., eds). Digital resource at www.catalogueoflife.org/col/. Species 2000: Reading, UK.
  • Farjon, A. & Styles, B.T. 1997. Pinus (Pinaceae) (Flora Neotropica Monograph 75). The New York Botanical Garden, New York
  • Great Plains Flora Association. 1986. Fl. Great Plains i–vii, 1–1392. University Press of Kansas, Lawrence.
  • Hultén, E. 1968. Fl. Alaska i–xxi, 1–1008. Stanford University Press, Stanford.
  • Image metadata at Bioimages (http://bioimages.vanderbilt.edu/)   http://bioimages.vanderbilt.edu/baskauf/00000 External link.
  • Marticorena C & R Rodríguez . 1995-2005. Flora de Chile. Vols 1, 2(1-3). Ed. Universidad de Concepción, Concepción. 351 pp., 99 pp., 93 pp., 128 pp. Matthei O. 1995. Manual de las malezas que crecen en Chile. Alfabeta Impresores. 545 p.
  • Moss, E. H. 1983. Fl. Alberta (ed. 2) i–xii, 1–687. University of Toronto Press, Toronto.
  • Munz, P. A. & D. D. Keck. 1959. Cal. Fl. 1–1681. University of California Press, Berkeley.
  • Welsh, S. L. 1974. Anderson's Fl. Alaska Adj. Parts Canada i–xvi, 1–724. Brigham Young University Press, Provo.
  • Zuloaga, F. O., O. N. Morrone, M. J. Belgrano, C. Marticorena & E. Marchesi. (eds.) 2008. Catálogo de las plantas vasculares del Cono Sur. Monogr. Syst. Bot. Missouri Bot. Gard. 107(1–3): i–xcvi, 1–3348.
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    1. Alexander, Robert R. 1966. Harvest cutting old-growth lodgepole pine  in the central Rocky Mountains. Journal of Forestry 64(2):113-116.
    2.  
    3. Alexander, Robert R. 1966. Site indexes for lodgepole pine with  corrections for stand density: instructions for field use. USDA Forest  Service, Research Paper RM-24. Rocky Mountain Forest and Range  Experiment Station, Fort Collins, CO. 7 p.
    4.  
    5. Alexander, Robert R. 1974. Silviculture of subalpine forest in the  central and southern Rocky Mountains: the status of our knowledge. USDA  Forest Service, Research Paper RM-121. Rocky Mountain Forest and Range  Experiment Station, Fort Collins, CO. 88 p.
    6.  
    7. Alexander, Robert R., and Carleton B. Edminster. 1980. Lodgepole  pine management in the central Rocky Mountains. Journal of Forestry  78(4):196-201.
    8.  
    9. Alexander, Robert R., and Carleton B. Edminster. 1981. Management of  lodgepole pine in even-aged stands in the central Rocky Mountains. USDA  Forest Service, Research Paper RM-229. Rocky Mountain Forest and Range  Experiment Station, Fort Collins, CO. 11 p.
    10.  
    11. Alexander, Robert R., David Tackle, and Walter G. Dahms. 1967. Site  indexes for lodgepole pine with corrections for stand density:  methodology. USDA Forest Service, Research Paper RM-29. Rocky Mountain  Forest and Range Experiment Station, Fort Collins, CO. 18 p.
    12.  
    13. Amman, Gene D. 1975. Insects affecting lodgepole pine productivity.  In Proceedings, Symposium on Management of Lodgepole Pine  Ecosystems, October 9-11, 1973. p. 310-341. Washington State University,  Pullman.
    14.  
    15. Amman, Gene D. 1978. Biology, ecology, and causes of outbreaks of  the mountain pine beetle in lodgepole pine forests. In Proceedings,  Symposium on Theory and Practice of Mountain Pine Beetle Management in  Lodgepole Pine Forests, April 25-27, 1978. p. 39-53. Washington State  University, Pullman.
    16.  
    17. Amman, Gene D., comp. 1989. Proceedings-Symposium on the Management  of Lodgepole Pine to Minimize Losses to the Mountain Pine Beetle, July  12-14, 1988. Kalispell, MT. USDA Forest Service, General Technical  Report INT-262. Intermountain Research Station, Ogden UT. 119 p.
    18.  
    19. Baer, Norman, Frank Ronco, and Charles W. Barrey. 1977. Effects of  watering, shading, and size of stock on survival of planted lodgepole  pine. USDA Forest Service, Research Note RM-347. Rocky Mountain Forest  and Range Experiment Station, Fort Collins, CO. 4 p.
    20.  
    21. Baranyay, J. A. 1975. Dwarf mistletoe as a factor in the management  of lodgepole pine forests in western Canada. In Proceedings,  Symposium on Management of Lodgepole Pine Ecosystems, October 9-11,  1973. p. 359-376. Washington State University, Pullman.
    22.  
    23. Brown, James K. 1975. Fire cycles and community dynamics in lodgepole  pine forests. In Proceedings, Symposium on Management of  Lodgepole Pine Ecosystems, October 9-11, 1973. p. 429-456. Washington  State University, Pullman.
    24.  
    25. Cochran, P. H. 1969. Thermal properties and surface temperatures of  seedbeds: a guide for foresters. USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest  Forest and Range Experiment Station, Portland, OR. 19 p.
    26.  
    27. Cochran, P. H. 1972. Tolerance of lodgepole and ponderosa pine seeds  and seedlings to high water tables. Northwest Science 46(4):322-331. 
    28.  
    29. Cochran, P. H. 1975. Response of pole-size lodgepole pine to  fertilization. USDA Forest Service, Research Note PNW-247. Pacific  Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Portland, OR. 10 p.
    30.  
    31. Cochran, P. H., and Carl M. Berntsen. 1973. Tolerance of lodgepole  and ponderosa pine seedlings to low night temperatures. Forest Science  19(4):272-280.
    32.  
    33. Cole, Dennis M. 1975. Culture of immature lodgepole pine stands for  timber objectives. In Proceedings, Symposium on Management of  Lodgepole Pine Ecosystems, October 9-11, 1973. p. 536-555. Washington  State University, Pullman.
    34.  
    35. Cole, Dennis M. 1978. Feasibility of silvicultural practices for  reducing losses to the mountain pine beetle in lodgepole pine forests.  In Proceedings, Symposium on Theory and Practice of Mountain  Pine Beetle Management in Lodgepole Pine Forests, April 25-27, 1978. p.  140-147. Washington State University, Pullman.
    36.  
    37. Cole, Walter E. 1978. Management strategies for preventing mountain  pine beetle epidemics in lodgepole pine stands: based on empirical  models. In Proceedings, Symposium on Theory and Practice of  Mountain Pine Beetle Management in Lodgepole Pine Forests, April 25-27,  1978. p. 87-97. Washington State University, Pullman.
    38.  
    39. Critchfield, William B. 1980. Genetics of lodgepole pine. USDA Forest  Service, Research Paper WO-37. Washington, DC. 57 p.
    40.  
    41. Dahms, Walter G. 1963. Dispersal of lodgepole pine seed into  clear-cut patches. USDA Forest Service, Research Note PNW-3. Pacific  Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Portland, OR. 7 p.
    42.  
    43. Dahms, Walter G. 1964. Gross and net yield tables for lodgepole pine.  USDA Forest Service, Research Paper PNW-8. Pacific Northwest Forest and  Range Experiment Station, Portland, OR. 14 p.
    44.  
    45. Dahms, W. G., and J. W. Barrett. 1975. Seed production of central  Oregon ponderosa and lodgepole pines. USDA Forest Service, Research  Paper PNW-19. Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station,  Portland, OR. 13 p.
    46.  
    47. Despain, Don G. 1973. Vegetation of the Big Horn Mountains, Wyoming,  in relation to substrate and climate. Ecological Monographs  43(3):329-355.
    48.  
    49. Edminster, Carleton B. 1978. RMYLD: computation of yield  tables for even-aged and two-storied stands. USDA Forest Service,  Research Paper RM-199. Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment  Station, Fort Collins, CO. 26 p.
    50.  
    51. Eyre, F. H., ed. 1980. Forest cover types of the United States and  Canada. Society of American Foresters, Washington, DC. 148 p.
    52.  
    53. Fowells, H. A., comp. 1965. Silvics of forest trees of the United  States. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agriculture Handbook 271.  Washington, DC. 762 p.
    54.  
    55. Hatch, Charles R. 1967. Effect of partial cutting in overmature  lodgepole pine. USDA Forest Service, Research Note INT-66. Intermountain  Forest and Range Experiment Station, Ogden, UT. 7 p.
    56.  
    57. Hawksworth, Frank G. 1975. Dwarf mistletoe and its role in lodgepole  pine ecosystems. In Proceedings, Symposium on Management of  Lodgepole Pine Ecosystems, October 9-11, 1973. p. 342-358. Washington  State University, Pullman.
    58.  
    59. Hoffman, George R., and Robert R. Alexander. 1976. Forest vegetation  of the Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming: a habitat type classification. USDA  Forest Service, Research Paper RM-170. Rocky Mountain Forest and Range  Experiment Station, Fort Collins, CO. 38 p.
    60.  
    61. Holmes, John R. B., and David Tackle. 1962. Height growth of  lodgepole pine in Montana related to soil and stand factors. Montana  Forest and Conservation Experiment Station, Bulletin 21. Montana State  University, School of Forestry, Missoula. 12 p.
    62.  
    63. Johnstone, W. D. 1975. Variable stand density yields of natural  lodgepole pine stands in Alberta. In Proceedings, Symposium on  Management of Lodgepole Pine Ecosystems, October 9-11, 1973. p. 186-207.  Washington State University, Pullman.
    64.  
    65. Krebill, R. G. 1975. Lodgepole pine's fungus-caused diseases and  decays. In Proceedings, Symposium on Management of Lodgepole  Pine Ecosystems, October 9-11, 1973. p. 377-405. Washington State  University, Pullman.
    66.  
    67. Lotan, James E. 1964. Initial germination and survival of lodgepole  pine on prepared seedbeds. USDA Forest Service, Research Note INT-29.  Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Ogden, UT. 8 p.
    68.  
    69. Lotan, James E. 1964. Regeneration of lodgepole pine: a study of  slash disposal and cone opening. USDA Forest Service, Research Note  INT-16. Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Ogden, UT. 4  p.
    70.  
    71. Lotan, James E. 1967. Eleven-year results of strip-thinning by  bulldozer in thirty-year-old lodgepole pine. USDA Forest Service,  Research Note INT-69. Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station,  Ogden, UT. 6 p.
    72.  
    73. Lotan, James E. 1975. The role of cone serotiny in lodgepole pine  forests. In Proceedings, Symposium on Management of Lodgepole  Pine Ecosystems, October 9-11, 1973. p. 471-495. Washington State  University, Pullman.
    74.  
    75. Lotan, James E. 1975. Regeneration of lodgepole pine forests in the  northern Rocky Mountains. In Proceedings, Symposium on  Management of Lodgepole Pine Ecosystems, October 9-11, 1973. p. 516-535.  Washington State University, Pullman.
    76.  
    77. Lotan, James E. 1976. Cone serotiny-fire relationships in lodgepole  pine. In Proceedings, Fourteenth Annual Tall Timbers Fire  Ecology Conference. p. 267-278. Tall Timbers Research Station,  Tallahassee, FL.
    78.  
    79. Lotan, James E., and Allen K. Dahlgreen. 1971. Hand preparation of  seedbeds improves spot seeding of lodgepole in Wyoming. USDA Forest  Service, Research Note INT-148. Intermountain Forest and Range  Experiment Station, Ogden, UT. 7 p.
    80.  
    81. Lotan, James E., and David A. Perry. 1977. Fifth-year seed: seedling  ratios of lodgepole pine by habitat type and seedbed preparation  technique. USDA Forest Service, Research Note INT-239. Intermountain  Forest and Range Experiment Station, Ogden, UT. 6 p.
    82.  
    83. Lotan, James E., and David A. Perry. 1983. Ecology and regeneration  of lodgepole pine. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agriculture Handbook  606. Washington, DC. 51 p.
    84.  
    85. Minore, Don. 1970. Seedling growth of eight northwestern tree  species over three water tables. USDA Forest Service, Research Note  PNW-115. Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station,  Portland, OR. 8 p.
    86.  
    87. Mitchell, R. G., R. H. Waring, and G. B. Pitman. 1981. Thinning  lodgepole pine in Oregon to increase tree vigor and reduce mountain pine  beetle damage. Unpublished report. Oregon State University, Corvallis. 
    88.  
    89. Moir, William H. 1969. The lodgepole pine zone in Colorado. American  Midland Naturalist 81(l):87-98.
    90.  
    91. Myers, Clifford A. 1967. Yield tables for managed stands of  lodgepole pine in Colorado and Wyoming. USDA Forest Service, Research  Paper RM-26. Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Fort  Collins, CO. 20 p.
    92.  
    93. Noble, Daniel L. 1979. Roots of lodgepole pine seedlings reach depth  of only 3 to 4 inches their first season. USDA Forest Service, Research  Note RM-363. Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Fort  Collins, CO. 3 p.
    94.  
    95. Perry, David A., and James E. Lotan. 1977. Opening temperatures in  serotinous cones of lodgepole pine. USDA Forest Service, Research Note  INT-228. Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Ogden, UT. 6  p.
    96.  
    97. Perry, David A., and James E. Lotan. 1979. A model of fire selection  for serotiny in lodgepole pine. Evolution 33(3):958-968.
    98.  
    99. Pfister, Robert D., and James R. Daubenmire. 1975. Ecology of  lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Douglas). In Proceedings,  Symposium on Management of Lodgepole Pine Ecosystems, October 9-11,  1973. p. 27-46. Washington State University, Pullman.
    100.  
    101. Ronco, Frank. 1967. Lessons from artificial regeneration studies in  a cutover beetle-killed spruce stand in western Colorado. USDA Forest  Service, Research Note RM-90. Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment  Station, Fort Collins, CO. 8 p.
    102.  
    103. Satterlund, Donald R. 1975. Climatic factors and lodgepole pine.  In Proceedings, Symposium on Management of Lodgepole Pine  Ecosystems, October 9-11, 1973. p. 297-309. Washington State University,  Pullman.
    104.  
    105. Schmidt, Wyman C., and James E. Lotan. 1980. Phenology of common  forest flora of the Northern Rockies-1928 to 1937. USDA Forest Service,  Research Paper INT-259. Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment  Station, Ogden, UT. 20 p.
    106.  
    107. Schopmeyer, C. S., tech. coord. 1974. Seeds of woody plants in the  United States. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agriculture Handbook 450.  Washington, DC. 883 p.
    108.  
    109. Sheppard, Wayne D., and Daniel L. Noble. 1976. Germination,  survival, and growth of lodgepole pine under simulated precipitation  regimes: a greenhouse study. USDA Forest Service, Research Note RM-328.  Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Fort Collins, CO. 4  p.
    110.  
    111. Smithers, L. A. 1961. Lodgepole pine in Alberta. Canadian Department  of Forestry, Bulletin 127. Ottawa, ON. 153 p.
    112.  
    113. Stephens, F. R. 1966. Lodgepole pine-soil relations in the northwest  Oregon Cascade Mountains. Journal of Forestry 64(3):184-186.
    114.  
    115. Tackle, David. 1964. Regenerating lodgepole pine in central Montana  following clearcutting. USDA Forest Service, Research Note INT-17.  Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Ogden, UT. 7 p.
    116.  
    117. Wellner, Charles A. 1975. The importance of lodgepole pine in the  United States. In Proceedings, Symposium on Management of  Lodgepole Pine Ecosystems, October 9-11, 1973. p. 1-9. Washington State  University, Pullman.
    118.  
    119. Wirsing, John M., and Robert R. Alexander. 1975. Forest habitat  types on the Medicine Bow National Forest, southeastern Wyoming:  preliminary report. USDA Forest Service, General Technical Report RM-12.  Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Fort Collins, CO. 11  p.
    120.  
     

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