The following bibliography has been generated by bringing together all references provided by our content partners. There may be duplication.

References

  • Agriculturalist's Manual 354–355. 1836. (Agric. Man.)
  • Bean, W.J. 1980. Trees and shrubs hardy in the British Isles, ed. 8, Vols. 1-4. John Murray, London
  • Burns, Russell M., and Barbara H. Honkala, technical coordinators. 1990. Silvics of North America: 1. Conifers; 2. Hardwoods.   Agriculture Handbook 654 (Supersedes Agriculture Handbook 271,Silvics of Forest Trees of the United States, 1965).   U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Washington, DC. vol.2, 877 pp.   http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/silvics_manual/table_of_contents.htm External link.
  • CONABIO. 2009. Catálogo taxonómico de especies de México. 1. In Capital Nat. México. CONABIO, Mexico City.
  • Correll, D. S. & M. C. Johnston. 1970. Man. Vasc. Pl. Texas i–xv, 1–1881. The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson.
  • Douglas ex C. Lawson. 1836. In: Agric. Man.: 354.
  • Farjon A. (2013). Conifer Database (version Jul 2011). In: Species 2000 & ITIS Catalogue of Life, 11th March 2013 (Roskov Y., Kunze T., Paglinawan L., Orrell T., Nicolson D., Culham A., Bailly N., Kirk P., Bourgoin T., Baillargeon G., Hernandez F., De Wever A., eds). Digital resource at www.catalogueoflife.org/col/. Species 2000: Reading, UK.
  • Farjon, A. & Styles, B.T. 1997. Pinus (Pinaceae) (Flora Neotropica Monograph 75). The New York Botanical Garden, New York
  • Great Plains Flora Association. 1986. Fl. Great Plains i–vii, 1–1392. University Press of Kansas, Lawrence.
  • Hitchcock, C. H., A.J. Cronquist, F. M. Ownbey & J. W. Thompson. 1969. Vascular Cryptogams, Gymnosperms, and Monocotyledons. 1: 1–914. In C. L. Hitchcock Vasc. Pl. Pacif. N.W. University of Washington Press, Seattle.
  • Image metadata at Bioimages (http://bioimages.vanderbilt.edu/)   http://bioimages.vanderbilt.edu/baskauf/00000 External link.
  • Marticorena C & R Rodríguez . 1995-2005. Flora de Chile. Vols 1, 2(1-3). Ed. Universidad de Concepción, Concepción. 351 pp., 99 pp., 93 pp., 128 pp. Matthei O. 1995. Manual de las malezas que crecen en Chile. Alfabeta Impresores. 545 p.
  • Munz, P. A. & D. D. Keck. 1959. Cal. Fl. 1–1681. University of California Press, Berkeley.
  • Munz, P. A. 1974. Fl. S. Calif. 1–1086. University of California Press, Berkeley.
  • Zuloaga, F. O., O. N. Morrone, M. J. Belgrano, C. Marticorena & E. Marchesi. (eds.) 2008. Catálogo de las plantas vasculares del Cono Sur. Monogr. Syst. Bot. Missouri Bot. Gard. 107(1–3): i–xcvi, 1–3348.
  •    
       
    1. Arno, Stephen F. 1979. Forest regions of Montana. USDA Forest  Service, Research Paper INT-218. Intermountain Forest and Range  Experiment Station, Ogden, UT. 39 p.
    2.  
    3. Barrett, James W. 1978. Height growth and site index curves for  managed, even-aged stands of ponderosa pine in the Pacific Northwest.  USDA Forest Service, Research Paper PNW-232. Pacific Northwest Forest  and Range Experiment Station, Portland, OR. 14 p.
    4.  
    5. Barrett, James W. 1979. Silviculture of ponderosa pine in the  Pacific Northwest: the state of our knowledge. USDA Forest Service,  General Technical Report PNW-97. Pacific Northwest Forest and Range  Experiment Station, Portland, OR. 106 p.
    6.  
    7. Barrett, James W. 1982. Twenty-year growth of ponderosa pine  saplings thinned to five spacings in central Oregon. USDA Forest  Service, Research Paper PNW-301. Pacific Northwest Forest and Range  Experiment Station, Portland, OR. 18 p.
    8.  
    9. Barrett, James W., and Lewis F. Roth. 1985. Response of dwarf  mistletoe-infested ponderosa pine to thinning: 1. Sapling growth. USDA  Forest Service, Research Paper PNW-330. Pacific Northwest Forest and  Range Experiment Station, Portland, OR. 15 p.
    10.  
    11. Bega, Robert V., tech. coord. 1978. Diseases of Pacific Coast  conifers. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agriculture Handbook 521.  Washington, DC. 206 p.
    12.  
    13. Boldt, Charles E., and James L. Van Deusen. 1974. Silviculture of  ponderosa pine in the Black Hills: the status of our knowledge. USDA  Forest Service, Research Paper RM-124. Rocky Mountain Forest and Range  Experiment Station, Fort Collins, CO. 45 p.
    14.  
    15. Cochran, P. H., and Carl M. Berntsen. 1973. Tolerance of lodgepole  and ponderosa pine seedlings to low night temperatures. Forest Science  19(4):272-280.
    16.  
    17. Conkle, M. Thompson. 1973. Growth data for 29 years from the  California elevational transect study of ponderosa pine. Forest Science  19(l):31-39.
    18.  
    19. Conkle, M. Thompson, and William B. Critchfield. 1988. Genetic  variation and hybridization of ponderosa pine. In Ponderosa pine-the  species and its management, symposium proceedings. p. 27-43. Washington  State University, Pullman.
    20.  
    21. Critchfield, William B. 1966. Crossability and relationships of  California big-cone pines. In Proceedings, Second Genetics Workshop of  Society of American Foresters and the Seventh Lake States Forest Tree  Improvement Conference 1965. p. 36-44. USDA Forest Service, Research  Paper NC-6. North Central Forest Experiment Station, St. Paul, MN.
    22.  
    23. Critchfield, William B., and Elbert L. Little, Jr. 1966. Geographic  distribution of the pines of the world. U.S. Department of Agriculture,  Miscellaneous Publication 991. Washington, DC. 97 p.
    24.  
    25. Curtis, James D., and Donald W. Lynch. 1965. Ponderosa pine (Pinus  ponderosa Laws.). In Silvics of forest trees of the United States. p.  417-431. H. A. Fowells, comp. U.S. Department of Agriculture,  Agriculture Handbook 271. Washington, DC.
    26.  
    27. Dale, John W., and John A. Schenk. 1978. Cone production and  insect-caused seed losses of ponderosa pine in Idaho and adjacent  Washington and Montana. University of Idaho, Forest, Wildlife, and Range  Experiment Station, Bulletin 24. Moscow. 15 p.
    28.  
    29. Davis, Kathleen M., Bruce D. Clayton, and William C. Fisher. 1980.  Fire ecology of Lolo National Forest habitat types. USDA Forest Service,  General Technical Report INT-79. Intermountain Forest and Range  Experiment Station, Ogden, UT. 77 p.
    30.  
    31. Echols, R. M., and M. T. Conkle. 1971. The influence of plantation  and seed-source elevation on wood specific gravity of 20-year-old  ponderosa pines. Forest Science 17(3):388-394.
    32.  
    33. Eldridge, R. H., and H. Dowden. 1980. Susceptibility of five  provenances of ponderosa pine to Dothistroma needle blight. Plant  Disease 64(4):400-401.
    34.  
    35. Eyre, F. H., ed. 1980. Forest cover types of the United States and  Canada. Society of American Foresters, Washington, DC. 148 p.
    36.  
    37. Foiles, Marvin W., and James D. Curtis. 1965. Natural regeneration of  ponderosa pine on scarified group cuttings in central Idaho. Journal of  Forestry 63(7):530-535.
    38.  
    39. Franklin, Jerry F., and C. T. Dyrness. 1969. Vegetation of Oregon and  Washington. USDA Forest Service, Research Paper PNW-80. Pacific  Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Portland, OR. 216 p. 
    40.  
    41. Furniss, R. L., and V. M. Carolin. 1977. Western forest insects. U.S.  Department of Agriculture, Miscellaneous Publication 1339. Washington,  DC. 654 p.
    42.  
    43. Hadley, Elmer B. 1969. Physiological ecology of Pinus ponderosa  in southwestern North Dakota. American Midland Naturalist  81(2):289-314.
    44.  
    45. Hanks, Jess P., E. Lee Fitzhugh, and Sharon R. Hanks. 1983. A habitat  type classification system for ponderosa pine forests of northern  Arizona. USDA Forest Service, General Technical Report RM-97.  Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Fort Collins, CO. 22  p.
    46.  
    47. Heidmann, L. J. 1985. Ponderosa pine regeneration in the Southwest.  In Proceedings of the Society of American Foresters National  Convention 1985. p. 228-232. Society of American Foresters, Washington,  DC.
    48.  
    49. Hepting, George H. 1971. Diseases of forest and shade trees of the  United States. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agriculture Handbook 386.  Washington, DC. 658 p.
    50.  
    51. Hoff, R. J. 1988. Susceptibility of ponderosa pine to the needle cast  fungus Lophodermium baculiferum. USDA Forest Service, Research  Paper INT-386. Intermountain Research Station, Ogden, UT. 6 p.
    52.  
    53. Hoffman, George R., and Robert R. Alexander. 1976. Forest vegetation  of the Big Horn Mountains, Wyoming, a habitat type classification. USDA  Forest Service, Research Paper RM-170. Rocky Mountain Forest and Range  Experiment Station, Fort Collins, CO. 38 p.
    54.  
    55. James, R. L., F. W. Cobb, Jr., P. R. Miller, and J. R. Parmeter, Jr.  1980. Effects of oxidant air pollution on susceptibility of pine roots  to Fomes annosus. Phytopathology 70(6):560-563.
    56.  
    57. Jenkinson, James L. 1974. Ponderosa pine progenies: differential  response to ultramafic and granitic soils. USDA Forest Service, Research  Paper PSW-101. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station,  Berkeley, CA. 14 p.
    58.  
    59. Jones, John R. 1972. Moisture stresses in Arizona mixed-conifer  seedlings. USDA Forest Service, Research Paper RM-86. Rocky Mountain  Forest and Range Experiment Station, Fort Collins, CO. 8 p.
    60.  
    61. Krugman, Stanley L., and James L. Jenkinson. 1974. Pinus L.  Pine. In Seeds of woody plants in the United States. p. 598-638.  C. S. Schopmeyer, tech. coord. U.S. Department of Agriculture,  Agriculture Handbook 450. Washington, DC.
    62.  
    63. Larson, M. M. 1963. Initial root development of ponderosa pine  seedlings as related to germination date and size of seed. Forest  Science 9(4):456-460.
    64.  
    65. Larson, M. M. 1967. Effect of temperature on initial development of  ponderosa pine seedlings from three sources. Forest Science  13(3):286-294.
    66.  
    67. Larson, M. M., and Gilbert H. Schubert. 1969. Root  competition between ponderosa pine seedlings and grass. USDA Forest  Service, Research Paper RM-54. Rocky Mountain Forest and Range  Experiment Station, Fort Collins, CO. 12 p.
    68.  
    69. Layser, Earle F., and Gilbert H. Schubert. 1979. Preliminary  classification of the coniferous forest and woodland series of Arizona  and New Mexico. USDA Forest Service, Research Paper RM-208. Rocky  Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Fort Collins, CO. 27 p. 
    70.  
    71. Little, Elbert L., Jr. 1979. Checklist of United States trees (native  and naturalized). U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agriculture Handbook  541. Washington, DC. 375 p.
    72.  
    73. Lopushinsky, W., and G. 0. Klock. 1974. Transpiration of conifer  seedlings in relation to soil water potential. Forest Science  20(2):181-186.
    74.  
    75. Megahan, Walter F., and Robert Steele. 1987. An approach for  predicting snow damage to ponderosa pine plantations. Forest Science  33(2):485-503.
    76.  
    77. Meyer, Walter H. 1938. Yield of even-aged stands of ponderosa pine.  U.S. Department of Agriculture, Technical Bulletin 630. Washington, DC.  59 p.
    78.  
    79. Minore, Don. 1979. Comparative autecological characteristics of  northwestern tree species ... a literature review. USDA Forest Service,  General Technical Report PNW-87. Pacific Northwest Forest and Range  Experiment Station, Portland, OR. 72 p.
    80.  
    81. Moore, M. B., and F. A. Kidd. 1982. Seed source variation in induced  moisture stress germination of ponderosa pine. Tree Planters' Notes  33(l):12-14.
    82.  
    83. Namkoong, G., and M. T. Conkle. 1976. Time trends in genetic control  of height growth in ponderosa pine. Forest Science 22(l):2-12.
    84.  
    85. Oliver, William W. 1979. Early response of ponderosa pine to spacing  and brush: observations on a 12-year-old plantation. USDA Forest  Service, Research Note PSW-341. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range  Experiment Station, Berkeley, CA. 7 p.
    86.  
    87. Oliver, William W. 1984. Brush reduces growth of thinned ponderosa  pine in northern California. USDA Forest Service, Research Paper  PSW-172. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station,  Berkeley, CA. 7 p.
    88.  
    89. Peloquin, R. L. 1984. The identification of three-species hybrids in  the ponderosa pine complex. The Southwestern Naturalist 29(l):115-122. 
    90.  
    91. Peterson, Roger S. 1966. Limb rust damage to pine. USDA Forest  Service, Research Paper INT-31. Intermountain Forest and Range  Experiment Station, Ogden, UT. 10 p.
    92.  
    93. Pfister, Robert D., Bernard L. Kovalchik, Stephen F. Arno, and  Richard C. Presby. 1977. Forest habitat types of Montana. USDA Forest  Service, General Technical Report INT-34. Intermountain Forest and Range  Experiment Station, Ogden, UT. 174 p.
    94.  
    95. Powers, Robert Field. 1981. Nutritional ecology of ponderosa pine  (Pinus ponderosa Laws.) and associated species. Berkeley: The  University of California. 234 p. Ph.D. dissertation.
    96.  
    97. Powers, Robert F., and William W. Oliver. 1970. Snow breakage in a  pole-sized ponderosa pine plantation ... more damage at high stand  densities. USDA Forest Service, Research Note PSW-218. Pacific Southwest  Forest and Range Experiment Station, Berkeley, CA. 3 p.
    98.  
    99. Powers, Robert F., Steve R. Webster, and P. H. Cochran. 1988.  Estimating the response of ponderosa pine forests to fertilization. In  Proceedings-Future Forests of the Mountain West: A Stand Culture  Symposium. p. 219-225. Wyman C. Schmidt, comp. USDA Forest Service,  General Technical Report INT-243. Intermountain Research Station, Ogden,  UT.
    100.  
    101. Read, Ralph A. 1980. Genetic variation in seedling progeny of  ponderosa pine provenances. Forest Science Monograph 23. Society of  American Foresters, Washington, DC. 59 p.
    102.  
    103. Read, Ralph A., and John A. Sprackling. 1981. Hail damage  variation by seed source in a ponderosa pine plantation. USDA  Forest Service, Research Note RM-410. Rocky Mountain Forest and Range  Experiment Station, Fort Collins, CO. 6 p.
    104.  
    105. Rehfeldt, G. E. 1986. Adaptive variation in Pinus ponderosa from  Intermountain Regions. 1. Snake and Salmon River Basins. Forest Science  32(l):79-92.
    106.  
    107. Sartwell, Charles, and Robert E. Stevens. 1975. Mountain pine beetle  in ponderosa pine-prospects for silvicultural control in second-growth  stands. Journal of Forestry 73(3):136-140.
    108.  
    109. Schubert, Gilbert H. 1974. Silviculture of southwestern ponderosa  pine: the status of our knowledge. USDA Forest Service, Research Paper  RM-123. Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Fort  Collins, CO. 71 p.
    110.  
    111. Seidel, K. W. 1986. Tolerance of seedlings of ponderosa pine,  Douglas-fir, grand fir, and Engelmann spruce for high temperatures.  Northwest Science 60(l):1-7.
    112.  
    113. Schmid, J. M., J. C. Mitchell, and S. A. Mata. 1986. Ponderosa pine  conelet and cone mortality in central Arizona. Great Basin Naturalist  46(3):445-448.
    114.  
    115. Smith, Richard H. 1977. Monoterpines of ponderosa pine xylem resin in  western United States. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Technical  Bulletin 1532. Washington, DC. 48 p.
    116.  
    117. Sower, Lonne L., and Martin D. Shorb. 1984. Effect of western pine  shoot borer (Lepidoptera: Olethreutidae) on vertical growth of  ponderosa pine. Journal of Economic Entomology 77(4):932-935.
    118.  
    119. Squillace, A. E., and Roy R. Silen. 1962. Racial variation in  ponderosa pine. Forest Science Monograph 2. Society of American  Foresters, Washington, DC. 27 p.
    120.  
    121. Steele, Robert, Robert D. Pfister, Russell A. Ryker, and Jay A.  Kittams. 1981. Forest habitat types of central Idaho. USDA Forest  Service, General Technical Report INT-114. Intermountain Forest and  Range Experiment Station, Ogden, UT. 137 p.
    122.  
    123. Stone, Edward C., and James L. Jenkinson. 1970. Influence of soil  water on root growth capacity of ponderosa pine transplants. Forest  Science 16(2):230-239.
    124.  
    125. Thilenius, John F. 1971. Vascular plants of the Black Hills of South  Dakota and adjacent Wyoming. USDA Forest Service, Research Paper RM-71.  Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Fort Collins, CO. 43  p.
    126.  
    127. Tickner, R. L. 1969. Review of the rooting of pines. Proceedings of  the International Plant Propagation Society 19:132-137.
    128.  
    129. Wang, Chi-Wu. 1977. Genetics of ponderosa pine. USDA Forest Service,  Research Paper WO-34. Washington, DC. 24 p.
    130.  
    131. Wells, 0. 0. 1964. Geographical variation in ponderosa pine. 1. The  ecotypes and their distribution. Silvae Genetics 13:89-103.
    132.  
    133. White, E. M., J. R. Johnson, and J. T. Nichols. 1969. Prairie-forest  transition soils of the South Dakota Black Hills. Proceedings Soil  Science Society of America 33:932-936.
    134.  
    135. Wright, Jonathan W., Walter A. Lemmien, and John N. Bright. 1969.  Early height growth of ponderosa pine ecotypes in Michigan. Forest  Science 15(2):121-129.
    136.  
     

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!