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Overview

Distribution

Gansu, Nei Mongol, Ningxia, NE Qinghai, N Shaanxi, N Sichuan, Xinjiang [Kazakhstan, Mongolia, Russia (Far East, Siberia); SW Asia, Europe]
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Shrubs, rarely small trees, dioecious, rarely monoecious; bark grayish brown; branchlets densely arranged, ascending, slender, 0.8-1 mm in diam. Leaves both scalelike and needlelike; needlelike leaves usually present on young plants, rarely present on adult plants, decussate or in whorls of 3, closely appressed, 3-7 mm, concave adaxially, convex abaxially, apex sharply pointed; scalelike leaves decussate, rhombic or rhombic-ovate, 1-2.5 mm, abaxial gland central, prominent, elliptic. Pollen cones ellipsoid or oblong, 3-4 mm; microsporophylls 10-14, each with 2-4 pollen sacs. Seed cones light brownish green, brown, purplish blue, or black when ripe, often glaucous, usually irregularly globose, 5-8 × 5-9 mm, (1 or)2-seeded. Seeds ovoid, slightly flattened, 4-5 mm, ridged, with resin pits, apex blunt or slightly pointed.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
In montane to subalpine coniferous forests of Larix, Picea and Pinus, gradually replacing these where under human-imposed grazing regimes; also invading into alpine meadows when old grazing patterns are changed, e.g. intensified. In Central Asian mountains it occurs on S-facing slopes in mountain pastures in a characteristic pattern of rounded patches, often mixed with J. pseudosabina. Its altitudinal range is 700-3,000 m a.s.l. This species is most abundant on sunny, dry slopes in mountains with a mesic climate like the Alps; its drought tolerance accounts for its wider distribution in Asia into the Artemisia steppe and desert zones (var. arenaria). It is often found on limestone substrates but occurs on granitic rock as well, especially on drier slopes.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Forests or thickets on rocky mountain slopes and sand dunes; 1000-3300 m.
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Associations

Foodplant / saprobe
epiphyllous, erumpent, solitary or a few together, short-stalked apothecium of Chloroscypha sabinae is saprobic on dead leaf of Juniperus sabina
Remarks: season: 9-3

Foodplant / parasite
telium of Gymnosporangium confusum parasitises live branch of Juniperus sabina
Remarks: season: 4-5

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / gall
telium of Gymnosporangium sabinae causes gall of live, swollen branch of Juniperus sabina
Remarks: season: 4-5

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Juniperus sabina

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Juniperus sabina

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 3
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
Farjon, A.

Reviewer/s
Adams, R & Thomas, P.

Contributor/s

Justification
This is one of the most widespread conifer species in the world, occurring in habitats such as alpine-subalpine meadows with rocky outcrops and steppes or semi-deserts, that are not under serious environmental pressures globally.
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Population

Population
Locally abundant

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Major Threats
No specific threats have been identified for this species.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
This species is recorded from many protected areas across its range.
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Wikipedia

Juniperus sabina

Juniperus sabina (Savin Juniper or Savin) is a species of juniper native to the mountains of central and southern Europe and western and central Asia, from Spain east to eastern Siberia, typically growing at altitudes of 1,000-3,300 m.[2][3]

Descriptions[edit]

It is a shrub, very variable in shape, reaching 1–4 m tall. The leaves are of two forms, juvenile needle-like leaves 5–10 mm long, and adult scale-leaves 1–2 mm long on slender shoots 0.8–1 mm thick. Juvenile leaves are found mainly on seedlings but mature shrubs sometimes continue to bear some juvenile leaves as well as adult, particularly on shaded shoots low in the crown. It is largely dioecious with separate male and female plants, but some individual plants produce both sexes. The cones are berry-like, 5–9 mm in diameter, blue-black with a whitish waxy bloom, and contain 1-3 (rarely 4 or 5) seeds; they are mature in about 18 months. The male cones are 2–4 mm long, and shed their pollen in early spring.[2][3]

There are two varieties,[2] treated by some botanists as distinct species:[3]

Juniperus sabina is a popular ornamental shrub in gardens and parks, with numerous named cultivars selected.

The hybrid between Juniperus chinensis and Juniperus sabina, known as Juniperus × pfitzeriana (Pfitzer Juniper, synonym J. × media), is found in the wild where the two species meet in northwestern China, and is also very common as a cultivated ornamental plant. It is a larger shrub, growing to 3–6 m tall.

All parts of the plant are poisonous due to several toxic compounds including ethereal oils.[4]

This plant is the alternate (telial) host of the Pear Rust fungus Gymnosporangium fuscum.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Conifer Specialist Group (1998). Juniperus sabina. 2006. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN 2006. www.iucnredlist.org. Retrieved on 12 May 2006.
  2. ^ a b c Farjon, A. (2005). Monograph of Cupressaceae and Sciadopitys. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. ISBN 1-84246-068-4
  3. ^ a b c Adams, R. P. (2004). Junipers of the World. Trafford. ISBN 1-4120-4250-X
  4. ^ Plants for a Future: Juniperus sabina
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Notes

Comments

At least 12 varieties have been described in this very wide-ranging species; it must be noted that ± straight fertile branchlets are occasionally found on specimens from C Asia and Europe.
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