Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is distributed on the Central Plateau of Iran and adjacent areas of Afghanistan and Pakistan (as far east as Sind and Waziristan) (Minton 1966, Anderson, 1999). It is found from around 30 to 1,900 m above sea level.
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Continent: Near-East Asia
Distribution: Iran, Pakistan, Afghanistan  
Type locality: Persia
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Source: The Reptile Database

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This is a largely nocturnal species found in a wide range of dry habitats, including plains, hillsides, cliffs, rocky terraces and slopes, gravelly creek beds, and silty, gravelly and sandy soil. The vegetation cover is largely open steppe scrubland (Minton 1966, Anderson 1999).

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Agamura persica

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 7
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2010

Assessor/s
Papenfuss, T. Shafiei Bafti, S., Sharifi, M. & Ananjeva, N.

Reviewer/s
Cox, N., Temple, H.J. (Global Reptile Assessment Coordinating Team) & Böhm, M., Collen, B., Ram, M. (Sampled Red List Index Coordinating Team)

Contributor/s
De Silva, R., Milligan, H.T., Wearn, O.R., Wren, S., Zamin, T., Sears, J., Wilson, P., Lewis, S., Lintott, P. & Powney, G.

Justification
Agamura persica is listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, presumed large population, and because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category. This species is used in the international pet trade and so more research should be carried out into the harvest levels of this species to monitor if significant population declines take place in the future.
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Population

Population
This is a very common species.

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Major Threats
There are currently no major threats to this species. This species is used in the commercial pet trade, but there is no information to suggest this is causing a significant decline in population abundance.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are no specific conservation measures in place for this species, but it is likely that it occurs in several of the protected areas of Iran. Research into the harvest levels should be carried out to ensure it does not cause significant declines in this species.
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Wikipedia

Agamura persica

Agamura persica (Duméril, 1856), commonly known as the Persian spider gecko, hails from semidesert regions of Iran, Pakistan, and Afghanistan, where temperatures range from extreme summer day highs to extreme winter night lows.[1][2][3] Its long, slender legs and tail give it a spider-like impression and allow it to climb in its rocky habitat. The toes are slender, clawed, and angularly bent. It shares this feature with a number of other species and is classified as an angular-toed gecko. Two other species, Agamura femoralis (Smith, 1933) and Agamura misonnei (De Witte, 1973), are commonly placed in the genus, but Anderson (1999) and Khan (2003) referred them to the genus Rhinogecko.

Diagnostic features[edit]

Agamura persica nasal scales
Agamura persica chin scales
Agamura persica dorsal tail scales
Agamura persica ventral tail scales

Females range from 42 to 77 mm (SVL), with a tail of 34 to 59 mm, while males range from 35 to 65 mm, with a tail of 27 to 59 mm.[2]

Agamura persica has a light-grey upper body with yellow pigment and five dark crossbars almost as broad as the interspaces, with 9 to 10 on the tail and a flecked grey belly.[2][4]

Some colour and morphological differences exist between localities, but all are distinctly agamuroid.

hair color is blue

Subspecies[edit]

Agamura persica ssp. persica is found in the eastern regions of the species' range (eastern Iran, Afghanistan), and is differentiated by "three dark crossbars, first on nape, second behind shoulders, third in front of sacrum".[2] Agamura persica ssp. cruralis is found in the western regions (most of Iran) and is differentiated by "five darker brown dorsal crossbars, first on nape, fifth on sacrum, nine to ten on tail".[2]

Natural history[edit]

The Persian spider gecko inhabits rocky and stony terrain close to sandy semidesert, on hill slopes and barren plains. It is primarily nocturnal, but can be found during the day basking at temperatures of about 17.5°C (air) and 15.5°C (surface), and active at surface temperatures as high as 44°C. Agamura's "well-developed (but immovable) upper 'eyelid'"[2] is an adaptation to diurnal life. The lid serves as a sort of "sunshade".[1]

It is very docile and easily captured.

The Persian spider gecko reaches breeding size at 18 to 24 months of age. Its breeding period is from March to May, eggs are laid in June, and juveniles appear in September.[2][1]

Sexing[edit]

The male Agamura persica has an obvious hemipenal bulge visual from a side profile. The thin morphology of the gecko makes the bulge even more noticeable. The male also has two to four preanal pores, but a captive-bred male may have none to four. The female lacks a bulge and preanal pores entirely. The juvenile also lacks this bulge, but by about the eighth to 12th week (roughly 7–8 cm SVL) the male juvenile may begin to show slight bulging. It may happen as late as the fourth to sixth month.

In captivity[edit]

This species can be kept in captivity.[1]

Agamura persica preanal pores
Agamura persica copulating
Female Agamura persica digging before burying eggs


References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Szczerbak, N.N. & Golubev, M.L. (1986). Gecko Fauna of the USSR and Contiguous Regions. Kiev: Naukova Dumka.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g Anderson, Steven C. (1999). The Lizards of Iran. Ithaca, New York: Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles.
  3. ^ Meyer, Michael (2004). Agamura persica - der Spinnengecko aus dem Mittleren Osten. Draco, 18(5), 59-63.
  4. ^ Khan, M. S. (2006). Amphibians and Reptiles of Pakistan. Malabar, Florida: Krieger Publishing.
  • Spidergecko.com - Care and Husbandry of Agamura persica (http://www.spidergecko.com)
  • The Reptile Database (http://www.reptile-database.org)
  • Khan, M.S. 2003. Anmerkungen zur Morphologie, Verbreitung und den Habitatpräferenzen einiger pakistanischer Geckos. Sauria 25 (3): 35-47 [erratum in 25 (4): 27]
  • Khan, M. S. (2005). An Overview of the Angular-toed Geckos of Pakistan (Squamata: Gekkonidae). Gekko, 4.2. 20-30.
  • Khan, M. S. (2006). Amphibians and Reptiles of Pakistan. Malabar, Florida: Krieger Publishing.
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