Overview

Brief Summary

Biology

Few studies of the spineless forest lizard have taken place and little is therefore known of its biology. Unlike most lizards belonging to the Agamidae family, this species spends most of its time in the trees, rather than on the ground (6) (7). Agamids are diurnal and visually-orientated, with the crests and other ornamentation thought to serve as important signals in establishing and maintaining territories or in courtship (6) (8). Most agamids feed on insects and other small animals, although a few also feed on plant matter as adults (8). Like the vast majority of agamids, the spineless forest lizard is oviparous, or egg-laying (6).
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Description

The spineless forest lizard is one of four Calotes species endemic to Sri Lanka, which all share a common set of characteristics (2). These include a relatively short head, with swollen cheeks, backwards, or backwards and downwards pointing scales on the side of the body, and a tail that is strongly swollen at the base in fully grown adult males (2). This lizard is patterned with a mixture of pale moss-green, dark green and brown indistinct stripes on its body, extending from the back down the sides to the belly, and pale moss-green and dark brown to black rings around its limbs and tail. This cryptic colouration helps camouflage the small lizard from potential predators in the treetops of its habitat. The spineless forest lizard closely resembles the green garden lizard (Calotes calotes) but can be distinguished by the absence of spines above the ear found in other Calotes species (3), a feature that has earned the lizard its common name.
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Distribution

Continent: Asia
Distribution: Sri Lanka (Ceylon)  
Type locality: Peradeniya District, Ceylon.
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Range

This species is confined to the Knuckles Mountains, Agra-Bopath and Peak Wilderness regions of Sri Lanka, where it is found from 800 – 1,900 m above sea level (3) (4). Of the three protected areas listed above, the lizard is much more prominent in the Knuckles Mountains (5).
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Found in tropical moist montane forest (4).
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
EN
Endangered

Red List Criteria
B1+2bc

Version
2.3

Year Assessed
1996
  • Needs updating

Assessor/s
World Conservation Monitoring Centre

Reviewer/s

Contributor/s
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Status

Classified as Endangered (EN) on the IUCN Red List 2006 (1).
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Threats

Habitat destruction, fragmentation and disturbance pose a serious threat to the spineless forest lizard, with Sri Lanka's forests having been dramatically reduced in recent years due to clearance of montane forest mainly for cardamom cultivation, but also for grazing livestock, by logging companies, illegal logging and removal of timber by peripheral villagers (5) (7). Indeed, much of the forest understorey has been cleared for planting cardamom in the Knuckles Mountains where this lizard is found, although the canopy has been retained for shade (4). The Agra-Bopath area of this species' range is becoming increasingly isolated by surrounding vegetable cultivations and tea plantations, with the lack of clearly demarcated boundaries leading to significant encroachment into this forest (4) (5). Isolation of populations prevents both important genetic flow between subpopulations and means of escape from forest fires (4) (7). Further more, there is intensive use of pesticides on vegetable cultivations and tea plantations in Sri Lanka, which could be having a serious polluting affect. Although the impact these chemicals are having on non-target species is not yet known, studies elsewhere indicate that they could potentially be devastating (4), with possibilities for bioaccumulation (5). Climatic change and global warming may also be having a negative impact on the species as a result of forest diebacks due to acid rain (5). Domestic animals in the Knuckles Mountains such as cats, dogs and poultry also prey on reptiles (7), although the arboreal nature of the spineless forest lizard probably limits this threat.
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Management

Conservation

Project Knuckles 2004 was initiated to conduct the first in-depth study of reptiles and the primary threats facing them in the Knuckles Mountain Range (7). It was discovered that the region held some of the highest reptile diversity in the country, and is therefore an important site for conservation (9). The spineless forest lizard was one of three target species studied (9). The mountain range currently has little protected status or conservation management, but the discovery of many endemic and endangered reptiles in the area may help campaigns to achieve greater protection in the future (4).
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Wikipedia

Spineless Forest Lizard

The spineless forest lizard is one of four Calotes species endemic to Sri Lanka, which all share a common set of characteristics (2). These include a relatively short head, with swollen cheeks, backwards, or backwards and downwards pointing scales on the side of the body, and a tail that is strongly swollen at the base in fully grown adult males (2). This lizard is patterned with a mixture of pale moss-green, dark green and brown indistinct stripes on its body, extending from the back down the sides to the belly, and pale moss-green and dark brown to black rings around its limbs and tail. This cryptic colouration helps camouflage the small lizard from potential predators in the treetops of its habitat. The spineless forest lizard closely resembles the green garden lizard (Calotes calotes) but can be distinguished by the absence of spines above the ear found in other Calotes species (3), a feature that has earned the lizard its common name.

The Spineless Forest Lizard, Crestless Lizard or Lionhead Agama (Calotes liocephalus) is a species of lizard in the Agamidae family. It is endemic to Sri Lanka.

References

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